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Fundamentals of Collaborative Consumption Educator Slides

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By:
Sabine Benoit, Thomas L. Baker, Ruth N. Bolton, Thorsten Gruber, Jay Kandampully
A triadic framework for collaborative...

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Context of Research
Benoit, S./Baker, T./Bolton, R./Gruber, T./Kandampully, J. (2017), A Triadic Framework for Collaborati...

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Conceptualising CC
• Triadic, not dyadic, relationship: customer + peer service provider + platform provider
• Only tempor...

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Fundamentals of Collaborative Consumption Educator Slides

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Why do people use services like AirBnb and Uber? These slides summarise the findings of a recent publication in the Journal of Business Research that analyses this.

Rather watch a video summarising the content: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79hQ-4yTR2c

Rather want to see the content as infographic see: sabinebenoit.com

Abstract: Collaborative consumption (CC) is an increasingly prevalent form of exchange. CC occurs within a triangle of actors: a platform provider (e.g., Uber), a peer service provider (e.g., an Uber driver) and a customer. The platform provider's main role is matchmaking, so that a customer can access assets of a peer service provider. This paper has three objectives. First, this article identifies three criteria to delineate CC from related constructs
such as access-based consumption, sharing or renting. Second, it introduces a literature-based framework explicating the roles of the actors in the CC triangle along three dimensions: motives, activities and resources and capabilities. Third, it highlights areas for further research, such as the dynamics of CC, context-dependent motives and the emergence of professional (peer) service providers.

Want to read the entire article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.05.004

Why do people use services like AirBnb and Uber? These slides summarise the findings of a recent publication in the Journal of Business Research that analyses this.

Rather watch a video summarising the content: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79hQ-4yTR2c

Rather want to see the content as infographic see: sabinebenoit.com

Abstract: Collaborative consumption (CC) is an increasingly prevalent form of exchange. CC occurs within a triangle of actors: a platform provider (e.g., Uber), a peer service provider (e.g., an Uber driver) and a customer. The platform provider's main role is matchmaking, so that a customer can access assets of a peer service provider. This paper has three objectives. First, this article identifies three criteria to delineate CC from related constructs
such as access-based consumption, sharing or renting. Second, it introduces a literature-based framework explicating the roles of the actors in the CC triangle along three dimensions: motives, activities and resources and capabilities. Third, it highlights areas for further research, such as the dynamics of CC, context-dependent motives and the emergence of professional (peer) service providers.

Want to read the entire article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.05.004

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Fundamentals of Collaborative Consumption Educator Slides

  1. 1. By: Sabine Benoit, Thomas L. Baker, Ruth N. Bolton, Thorsten Gruber, Jay Kandampully A triadic framework for collaborative consumption (CC) Motives, activities and resources & capabilities of actors Benoit, S./Baker, T./Bolton, R./Gruber, T./Kandampully, J. (2017), A Triadic Framework for Collaborative Consumption: Motives, roles and resources, Journal of Business Research 79, 219-227, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.05.004 1
  2. 2. Context of Research Benoit, S./Baker, T./Bolton, R./Gruber, T./Kandampully, J. (2017), A Triadic Framework for Collaborative Consumption: Motives, roles and resources, Journal of Business Research 79, 219-227 2 What is collaborative consumption (CC)? • Consumers access goods and services • Goods and services are provided by a peer • Exchange is mediated through a technology platform Current status: • Emerging academic literature lacks formal conceptualisation of what collaborative consumption (CC) is. Objectives: • Delineate collaborative consumption from other forms of exchange • Define actors in terms of motives, activities, resources and capabilities • Suggest avenues for further research
  3. 3. Conceptualising CC • Triadic, not dyadic, relationship: customer + peer service provider + platform provider • Only temporary access to good or service – no transfer of ownership • Mediated through market, not social mechanisms Main characteristics 3 CC Buying Renting Access Based Services Sharing Number of actors involved 3 2 2 2 2 or more Nature of exchange No transfer of ownership Transfer of ownership No transfer of ownership No transfer of ownership No transfer of ownership Directness of exchange Mediated through market mechanisms Mediated through market mechanisms Mediated through market mechanisms Mediated through market mechanisms Mediated through social mechanisms How does CC compare with other forms of economic exchange? Benoit, S./Baker, T./Bolton, R./Gruber, T./Kandampully, J. (2017), A Triadic Framework for Collaborative Consumption: Motives, roles and resources, Journal of Business Research 79, 219-227
  4. 4. Roles of actors in CC 4 Consumer Peer-service provider Platform provider Motives (Why do actors get involved in CC)  Economic: reduce costs  Social: belong to “community”  Hedonic: access to luxury good  Reduce risks and responsibilities (in comparison with ownership)  Environmental benefits of “sharing” goods  Economic: income from underutilised asset  Entrepreneurial freedom  Social: get to know new people  Economic: making profits  Create innovative products/React to market trends  Build beneficial relationships with users Activities (What activities do actors in CC perform)  Interact with community  Provide information (profile, reviews,…)  Behave (e.g. leave a clean flat)  Grant access to a good  Act as main customer contact  Offer personalised service  Matchmaking: develop technology and algorithms  Present the brand and its value  Create trust and reduce risks  Shape and align social norms (provide “rules of the game”)  Resources smoothing (matching demand and supply) Resources and capabilities (What skills / resources are required)  Technical skills, i.e. being “tech- savvy”  Access to an asset  Good reputation/ reviews  Trustworthiness  Market knowledge  Good network (of consumers and peer-service providers)  Power to promote and protect CC  Stakeholder relations (mobilise people in and outside of the platform) Benoit, S./Baker, T./Bolton, R./Gruber, T./Kandampully, J. (2017), A Triadic Framework for Collaborative Consumption: Motives, roles and resources, Journal of Business Research 79, 219-227
  5. 5. Opportunities for future research 5 Platform provider: o Regulatory framework: employee status, taxes,… o Success factors: why are some successful, others not? o Customer service: how to ensure quality? ? ? ? ?? Customer: o Access: Does CC offer greater access to goods for lower income groups? o Motivations: Why might customers prefer CC to other forms of economic exchange? o Opinions: How do customers form expectations and evaluations? Peer-to-peer service provider: o Professionalisation: How to make them good brand ambassador without formal training? o Work conditions: How do they fit into the welfare system?, How does CC impact the future of work? o Evaluation: How to prevent discrimination against certain demographics of providers? Triadic ecosystem: o Service failure: Who recovers for service failure? o Value: What value is extracted from the relationships in the triangle by each actor? o Broader ecosystem perspective: How do norms in one sector affect norms in another? Benoit, S./Baker, T./Bolton, R./Gruber, T./Kandampully, J. (2017), A Triadic Framework for Collaborative Consumption: Motives, roles and resources, Journal of Business Research 79, 219-227

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