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Workshop 1 - Andrea Webster

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Workshop 1 - Andrea Webster

  1. 1. Moving Towards Community Resilience INDIANA UNIVERSITY Prepared for Environmental Change Grand Challenge Andrea Webster Implementation Manager Environmental Resilience Institute
  2. 2. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Established to host interdisciplinary researchers across IU to provide: Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication 2
  3. 3. INDIANA UNIVERSITY South Bend, Indiana 2018Terre Haute, Indiana 2015 Environmental change is happening in Indiana 3
  4. 4. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Defining Resilience Being resilient means we will be able to deal with change in ways that equitably protect the health, welfare and economic vitality of our human and ecological communities. Being resilient is not about running away from our way of life or waiting for the worst to happen, but growing toward stronger, cleaner, healthier, safer and more vibrant communities. 4
  5. 5. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication 5
  6. 6. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication A comparison of past and future conditions for Vigo County, Indiana 6
  7. 7. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication Rising temperatures > Extreme heat > Increased ozone production > Worsening air quality > Decreased demand for summertime outdoor tourism > Increased asthma attacks > Increased heart attacks > Causes or worsens respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses > Premature death > Increased likelihood of heat-related illness > Decreased demand for summertime outdoor tourism > Increased hospitalizations > Increased medical costs > Increased mortality 7
  8. 8. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication Increased precipitation > Increased flood risk > Increased risk of CSOs > Increased water pollution > Increased fertilizer runoff > Increased risk of human-derived nutrients entering waterways > Increased risk of algal blooms > Increased mosquito populations > Increased human physical injuries > Increased human displacement > Increased property loss > Increased post-flood mold and fungus growth > Increased stress on urban green drainage infrastructure > Degradation or loss of function of urban drainage green infrastructure > Increased CSOs > Excess stormwater > Impaired restoration of riparian buffers 8
  9. 9. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication 9
  10. 10. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication Rising temperatures > Extreme heat Urban Heat • Establish a Community-wide Extreme Heat Contingency Plan • Planning, Awareness, Cooling Centers, Transportation • Ordinances, Codes and Incentive Programs • Cool roofs • Cool pavements • Tree canopy and vegetation • Energy efficiency (reducing waste heat) 10
  11. 11. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication Increased precipitation > Increased flood risk Flooding • Vegetated infrastructure - Trees, Raingardens and Bioswales Green Roofs • Rainwater harvesting and downspout disconnection • Permeable pavement • Set aside open space, providing a buffer for rivers • Preserve wetlands and existing floodplains • Develop public information strategies • Make these and other changes through building code updates, zoning laws, master planning and hazard mitigation plans. 11
  12. 12. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication Increased precipitation > Increased flood risk Flooding • ***Update floodplain maps using projections • In the meantime - https://wikiwatershed.org/model/ • Remove impervious surfaces • Replace undersized culverts • Relocate facilities to higher elevations • Plan and establish alternative or on-site power supply • Build flood barriers to protect infrastructure 12
  13. 13. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication Key Takeaways 1. Know where your vulnerable populations are Populations at Risk https://headwaterseconomics.org/tools/populations-at-risk/ 2. Conduct one or more vulnerability assessments 3. Extreme Heat Contingency Plan 4. Update flood maps to include projections 5. Plant trees and other vegetation 6. Integrate climate-related risks into capital improvement plans 13
  14. 14. INDIANA UNIVERSITY ERIT The Environmental Resilience Institute Toolkit eri.iu.edu/ERIT 14
  15. 15. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Environmental Resilience Institute Toolkit (ERIT) 15
  16. 16. INDIANA UNIVERSITY ERIT The Environmental Resilience Institute Toolkit eri.iu.edu/ERIT 16
  17. 17. INDIANA UNIVERSITY ERIT The Environmental Resilience Institute Toolkit eri.iu.edu/ERIT 17
  18. 18. INDIANA UNIVERSITY 2019 Resilience Cohort • Deadline to Apply: Dec 14, 2018 • Peer-to-peer support program • Helps local governments in Indiana complete greenhouse gas inventories • Participants receive guidance from ICLEI- Local Governments for Sustainability USA • Some participants will receive externs through a partnership with Sustain IU Program Sponsors eri.iu.edu/prepare/resilience-cohort.html 18
  19. 19. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication Hoosier Resilience Index Scoring framework with two parts: vulnerability score and resilience score. Together, scores make up the index. Part I.Vulnerability Score Expected Impacts of Climate Change a) Heat b) Precipitation CommunityVulnerability c) SocialVulnerability Part II. Resilience Score Resilience actions that are responsive to impacts 19
  20. 20. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Prepared for Environmental Change Webinar Series January 8, 2019; 12-1pm IdentifyingYour Communities’Vulnerabilities to Environmental Change February 13, 2019; 12-1pm UsingGreenspace as an Adaptation Strategy March 13, 2019; 12-1pm Managing Storm Sewer Flooding Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication eri.iu.edu/prepare/webinars.html 20
  21. 21. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Environmental Resilience Institute Accurate Predictions Feasible Solutions Effective Communication https://www.indianaenvironmentalreporter.org/ Podcast: On Air with IER Becky Thiele with Indiana Public Media Environmental Resilience Institute YouTube Channel 21
  22. 22. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Follow ERI Environmental Resilience Institute at IU @Prepared4Change Environmental Resilience Institute at Indiana University @environmentalresilienceinstitute Subscribe to our e-newsletters eri.iu.edu 23

Editor's Notes

  • Thank you.
    Introduction.
    The Environmental Resilience Institute was established as the public-facing entity for the Prepared for Environmental Change Grand Challenge initiative.
  • The Environmental Resilience Institute was established as the public-facing entity for the Prepared for Environmental Change Grand Challenge initiative.

    Three pillars of accurate predictions, feasible solutions, and effective communication.

    Over 100 faculty from across the university with expertise in the movement of species, state and local government, public and environmental affairs, communications, media, history, law, art, geology, and more. It’s going to take everyone to find a solution to such a large problem.
  • Average annual precipitation has increased 5.6 inches since 1895, and more rain is falling in heavy downpours.
    By 2050, temperatures across southern Indiana are projected to experience between 38 and 51 days per year at or above 95F. Between 1915 and 2013, the same region averaged seven days per year at or above this temperature. Combined with rising temperatures in northern Indiana, this change is jeopardizing the nearly $6 billion generated by corn and soybean production each year and is impacting human health.
    Shorter, less intense winters have contributed to a startling 430% increase in documented cases of Lyme disease since 2001.
  • Being resilient is not about running away from our way of life or waiting for the worst to happen, but growing toward stronger, cleaner, healthier, safer and more vibrant communities.
  • Before we do anything, we need to know what we are up against. Which environmental changes are impacting Indiana? Certainly not sea level rise, but flooding is an issue.

    Scientists and decision makers from across the state are working together to develop a series of nine easily understandable reports that shows how a changing climate will affect state and local interests.
    Led by the Purdue Climate Change Research Center (PCCRC), the Indiana Climate Change Impacts Assessment (IN CCIA) provides the latest scientific research to help Hoosiers understand and prepare for the impacts of a changing climate.
    Our climate is changing, and we can use this information to build effective plans to prepare.


  • This data show a comparison of past and future conditions for Vigo County, Indiana.
    Past data are average values from 1971 to 2000.
    Future data (2050s) are average values from 2041 to 2070 based on a high emissions scenario



  • (Last one – which leads to increased erosion near waterways, decreased stream biodiversity
    Further back in this risk pathway we go, the more effective our treatment or action will be

  • Photos:
    EV Charging Station in South Bend
    Mass Ave – Indianapolis (LED Traffic Lights – Energy Efficiency)
    Solar in North Vernon Indiana
    Porous Pavement in Evansville, IN
  • Extreme Heat Plan– All communities have plans for blizzards, but almost none have plans for heat waves.
    (http://www.caloes.ca.gov/PlanningPreparednessSite/Documents/ExcessiveHeatContingencyPlan2014.pdf)
    Planning
    Establish a “working group” consisting of those agencies/departments, private, volunteer and service organizations, food banks, faith-based groups, immigrant groups and disability and older adult service organizations to identify the vulnerable populations, and develop a strategy for notification and emergency actions to include establishing cooling centers and transportation.
    Determine local activation levels of an extreme heat emergency plan utilizing the activation levels and phases indicated in this document and local weather conditions and climatic variations.
    Develop a plan for coordinating in-home visits to vulnerable populations with volunteer and service groups/organizations.
    Awareness
    Establish processes to rapidly disseminate extreme heat emergency advice to vulnerable populations
    Develop public safety materials (flyers, PSAs, etc)
    Cooling Centers
    Ensure that the facilities identified for cooling centers will be available.
    Confirm the points of contact for cooling center operations.
    Identify the services provided at the cooling facilities, taking into consideration accommodations for people with disabilities, service animals, domestic pets, and possible 24-hour operations.
    Coordinate with the local electric utility to identify and develop procedures for the operations of volunteered cooling centers that could be exempt from rotating blackouts, if necessary.
    Transportation
    Establish a transportation working group
    Identify and coordinate procedures, including memoranda of understanding, to ensure transportation, including wheelchair accessible transportation, is available for those in need of cooling centers.
    More extreme events
    Prioritize public offices that should remain open and close others to conserve energy
    Issue targeted extreme heat emergency advisories to vulnerable populations through all sources.
    Identify any regulatory or ordinance issues that may need to be suspended.
    Ensure all fleet vehicles fuel tanks have ample fuel in the event of power failure.

    Cool Roofs
    Louisville – cool roof rebate program, based on the mots vulnerable council districts
    Philadelphia – ordinance amending building code to require white or reflective roofs
    Chicago – energy code requires reflectivity of 72% or greater

    Cool Pavements
    (Impervious concrete and asphalt can reach 120-150 degrees in summer)
    Louisville, LA and Houston – test installations

    Tree Canopy
    Louisville – 45% tree canopy goal

    ***Focus by neighborhood, city council district, or Census tracts


  • Heat impacts and flooding impacts are compounded by urban development, which removes the trees, vegetation and soil that cool air temperatures and slow and filter water. Development also increases impervious surfaces.
    The annual average cost of flooding in the contiguous US is expected to be $747 million greater in 2011, a 31% increase from current levels.

    Strategies
    The National Flood Insurance Program, the Community Rating System recognizes any community floodplain management activities that reduce flood risk to the community. Communities can earn up to a 45% discount on flood insurance rates.








  • Cities should know their drainage basin. This website shows drainage basin and soil types (water drains through sand easily, but not clay). https://wikiwatershed.org/model/
    On this website, you can select a point (e.g., an area in your city you know that floods a lot), and see all area upstream that collects waters and sends water there. You can see the area that collects water and sends water to that point.
    This data can be used to improve data and understanding, but don't use it to make big decisions. The next step would be to engage an engineer to help interpret the relationship between the built environment and flooding.




  • ERIT

    Launched in September for local government officials and their staff to help communities prepare for environmental change
    Stocked full of resources to walk users through the adaptation process
    Need to know:
    Resources being developed focus on the Midwest
    We are integrating mitigation (GHG reduction) resources as well
  • ERIT
    We talked about a small scope of the water-related resources in ERIT. There is plenty more to explore.
  • ERIT

    We are constantly updating this with content
    We’ve added four new case studies and several funding opportunities since we launched in September, and we have more under development
  • Program we are offering in partnership with Sustain IU
    Up to 15 local governments in Indiana will complete GHG inventories in summer 2019
    Will receive access to GHG software and GHG experts through ICLEI
    Participants can apply to receive an extern through ISDP
    Applications or strong interest from: Bloomington, Columbus, Carmel, Goshen, Richmond. Applications are due Dec 14th and participants are selected in early January.
    Great opportunity for cities, towns and counties, and for students who can gain experience completing GHG inventories.
  • Goal is to provide a holistic framework of city resilience
    To enable a city, town or county to understand what it means to be a resilient community
    And they can begin to measure their community’s readiness to respond to long-term changes and immediate challenges
    Many types of this tool already exist around the world, but we envision that our index will be accessible to smaller communities, rural communities, and Midwestern communities.
  • To be able to implement feasible solutions, people need training.
    This fall, we will launch a webinar series to help guide you to the right solutions for your community.
  • We have social scientists and media scholars and practitioners evaluating the best methodologies for disseminating messages about environmental change
    ERI has funded three journalists to produce sharable content to educate Hoosiers about how changes will impact them

    Producing: Fact sheets, podcasts, news stories, TV programs, state-wide survey, tweets, posts, video clips,


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