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Oilseeds to jet fuels jakubek

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Oilseeds to jet fuels jakubek

  1. 1. Oilseeds to Jet Fuels: Networks and Hydrology Joseph Jakubek- Kansas State University Cornelia Flora- Kansas State University
  2. 2. Overview •Project purpose and context •Theoretical framework •Findings •Implications
  3. 3. Project Purpose • Oilseeds to Jet Fuels • Canola Biodiesel • Wheat producing regions of US • Align interests along the value chain • Move toward alternative fuel value chains
  4. 4. Context • Decreasing world-wide demand for petroleum fuels • Changing, unstable global energy markets • National energy policies now place more emphasis on renewable energy • Concerns related to production, transportation and consumption of fuel  Greenhouse gases & air pollution  Jobs  Contamination of water and soil
  5. 5. Renewable Energy & Biomass • New ways to generate energy • Reduces nonrenewable fossil fuel use • Based on renewable natural capital • Potential carbon-neutral fuels
  6. 6. Theoretical Framework • Community Capitals Framework (Flora, Flora, and Gasteyer 2016) • Analyzes the interaction of seven capitals • Community-level approach to development strategies • Community Inclusion, Sustainable Ecosystems, and Economic Growth.
  7. 7. Methods • Five focus groups  Wellington, Kansas; Minot and Mandan, North Dakota; Enid, Oklahoma; Kennewick, Washington • Semi-structured interviews with actors and organizations along the value chain.  Farmers, Processors, Transporters, Plant Breeders, Extension Professionals, and Farm Service Suppliers. • Analyze implications of implementing oilseed to jet fuel value chains in wheat producing regions and its impacts on stores and investment of community capitals on the growth and success of alternative fuel value chains.
  8. 8. Findings –Soil and Water • Canola biofuel value chains strongly impact all capitals. • Natural Capital • Cultural Capital and Sustainability • Social Capital and Networks • Human Capital and Appreciative Inquiry
  9. 9. Natural Capital • Landscape, Soil quality and health, water abundance, biodiversity • Canola Biodiesel:  Climate/weather – wheat systems shifting to corn-soybean systems  Oil quality  Erucic acid content  Harvest/standability  Timing of harvest  Rotation advantages  No till methods
  10. 10. Canola as a Soil Conditioner • Increases yields of wheat, corn, soybeans when included in rotation • Adds nitrogen to soil, reduces input necessity • Drought tolerant root system  Low water fields  Areas of fields with less water • Pest management • Increases biodiversity
  11. 11. Cultural Capital and Sustainability • Narratives surrounding renewable fuels • Sustainable producers identify as  Independent  Innovative  Risk takers • Value complexity in their reasoning and motivations • Concern for soil quality and health
  12. 12. Social Capital and Networks • Extension and planning services  Contact with trusted persons with authority and knowledge  Environmental and economic benefits • Communities of Place and Interest  Existing canola grower organizations  No Till and Direct Seeding organizations  Environmental organizations • Trust in the players in the supply chain  Community linkages important  Common goals: social, environmental, and economic
  13. 13. Human Capital and Appreciative Inquiry • Education, Skills, Talents, and Abilities • Farmers’ preferred methods of gaining information  Field days  Seminars  Face-to-face  Community education events  Internet  Extension • Knowledge of  Fields and what works best  Market alternatives  Production alternatives  Trustworthy sources of information • Willingness to change in light of new opportunities provided by  New markets  New production systems  New climate conditions  New technology availability
  14. 14. Motivations of Value Chain Participants • Multiple motivations are salient at different levels of value chain • Environmental motivations are prevalent  Sustainability  Renewable Fuels  Water Usage • Networks are what impact environmental and ecological concerns  Speaks to new framings of relationships between humans and ecosystem  Community Capitals and decision-making processes  Holistic change in agricultural value chains
  15. 15. • Thank You

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