Ch17 slides

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Prof. Wozencraft
ENG227

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Ch17 slides

  1. 1. Informational reports can take many forms: • e-mails • memos • forms • reports • Web pages Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 1
  2. 2. The writing process for informational reports includes six steps:• Analyze your audience.• Analyze your purpose.• Research the subject and compile your information.• Choose an appropriate format.• Draft the report.• Revise, edit, and proofread the report. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 2
  3. 3. Consider three questions whenwriting reports for multicultural readers:• How might your readers react to your informational report?• Will your readers be comfortable with your choice of application?• Do you need to adjust your writing style? Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 3
  4. 4. You likely will have to write five types of informational reports:• directives• field reports• progress and status reports• incident reports• meeting minutes Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 4
  5. 5. Use this strategy when writing directives:• Explain why the new policy is desirable or at least necessary.• Present clear, compelling evidence.• Consider opposing arguments effectively.• Present yourself as cooperative, moderate, fair-minded, and modest.• If appropriate, include arguments that appeal to readers’ broader goals of security, recogni- tion, professional growth, and connectedness. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 5
  6. 6. Use this strategy when writing field reports: • Describe inspections, maintenance, and site studies. • Explain the problem, methods, results, and conclusions. • Deemphasize methods. • Include recommendations if needed. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 6
  7. 7. Answer these six questions in a field report: • What is the purpose of the report? • What are the main points covered in the report? • What were the problems leading to the decision to perform the procedure? • What methods were used? • What were the results? • What do the results mean? Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 7
  8. 8. Understand the difference between a progress report and a status report:• A progress report describes an ongoing project.• A status report, or activity report, describes the entire range of operations of a department or division. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 8
  9. 9. Report your progress honestly whenresponding to three common problems:• The deliverable won’t be what you thought it would be.• You won’t meet your schedule.• You won’t meet the budget. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 9
  10. 10. Two organizational patterns are typical in progress and status reports:Time Pattern Task PatternDiscussion Discussion A. Past Work A. Task 1 B. Future Work 1. Past Work 2. Future Work B. Task 2 1. Past Work 2. Future Work Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 10
  11. 11. Project an appropriate tone in a progress or status report:• If the news is good, convey your optimism but avoid overstatement.• Don’t panic if the preliminary results are not as promising as you had planned or if the project is behind schedule. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 11
  12. 12. Use this strategy when writing incident reports:• Explain what happened.• Explain why it happened.• Explain what the organization did or will do to follow up on the incident. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 12
  13. 13. Use this strategy when writing meeting minutes:• Be clear, comprehensive, objective, and diplomatic.• Report the events of the meeting accurately.• Do not record emotional exchanges between participants; the minutes should reflect positively on participants and the organization. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 13

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