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ANNUAL REPORT │ 2015
MICHIGAN STEM PARTNERSHIP
Page 2ANNUAL REPORT
There is a need for a statewide direction for STEM, rather than silos of activities,
uncoordinated and...
Page 3 ANNUAL REPORT
Message from our Chairman
Welcome to the Michigan STEM Partnership. Formed by Michigan Legislative
Ac...
Page 4ANNUAL REPORT
Michigan STEM Partnership State Board
Mission Statement:
The mission of the Michigan STEM Partnership ...
Page 5 ANNUAL REPORT
Board Members
Paul Agosta (Chair) is the owner of Applied Technology Systems and ATTI of Michigan. Th...
Page 6ANNUAL REPORT
Board Members
Jarrod Grandy is the Director of Career Readiness, Kent Intermediate School District in ...
Page 7 ANNUAL REPORT
Board Members
Kathleen Bushnell Owsley is the Executive Director, Bosch Community Fund. She moved fro...
Page 8ANNUAL REPORT
Goals
Overarching Goal:
The Michigan STEM Partnership will be a primary contributor to the growth and ...
Page 9 ANNUAL REPORT
Grants
Page 10ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORTPage 11
2015 grants—Hub Disbursement Award List
BAY HUB
Get’M—Girls Entering Technology & Multi-media $8,810 ...
Page 12ANNUAL REPORT
SUPERIOR HUB
C3PO for Students $10,049,40 Northern Michigan University—
Marquette
Geometry in Constru...
Page 13 ANNUAL REPORT
Resources and Financial Management
The Michigan STEM Partnership had total cash revenue of $475,000 ...
Page 14ANNUAL REPORT
Your Donation is More ImportantThan Ever Before
The Michigan STEM Partnership ended 2015 planning an ...
Page 15
ANNUAL REPORT
Looking Forward
The Michigan STEM Partnership received its 501(c)3 status in December 2015. This all...
Page 16ANNUAL REPORT
The Status of STEM—in the U.S. and in Michigan * **
Michigan:
 STEM job-holders earn more on average...
Page 17
ANNUAL REPORT
Page 17 ANNUAL REPORT
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MI STEM Partnership - 2015 Annual Report

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2015 activity and results summary; additionally US and Michigan STEM statistics

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MI STEM Partnership - 2015 Annual Report

  1. 1. ANNUAL REPORT │ 2015 MICHIGAN STEM PARTNERSHIP
  2. 2. Page 2ANNUAL REPORT There is a need for a statewide direction for STEM, rather than silos of activities, uncoordinated and random efforts. This is imperative for clearer understanding of STEM’s role in workforce and economic development. Academic institutions have been increasingly viewed as eco-systems of economic growth. What has gained the most attention is the role of R&D in creating new products, processes and services. A prominent indica- tor of such R&D results is the volume of patents produced. While Michigan’s academic institutions are in the top 10 of metro areas for patent applications, it is in the lower end overall for patents received (2013). A critical need for STEM education in Michigan is the inclusion of instructional and training activities that build skills and apply methodologies for problem solving, innovation, and invention-on-demand.
  3. 3. Page 3 ANNUAL REPORT Message from our Chairman Welcome to the Michigan STEM Partnership. Formed by Michigan Legislative Action in 2011, the MI STEM Partnership is charged with developing connections between all levels of education, community organizations, and business and industry to promote and implement STEM education and skill development across the State of Michigan. The Partnership recently received its tax designation as a 501c3 which will allow us to work closely with funding agencies in order to promote and support STEM education. The MI STEM Partnership Board of Directors is comprised of representatives from education (K-12, Community College, and University), after-school and community organizations, professional organizations, and large and medium-sized corporations representing business sectors throughout the state. The mission of the Board is to insure that the talent required to satisfy the needs of the high-wage, high-skill jobs across the State is addressed. The Partnership views the integration of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics as a workforce development initiative requiring the collaboration of stakeholders who traditionally have not effectively worked together. We believe that students need to understand how these disciplines are inter-dependent in order to obtain a clear picture of their application in the workplace. The application of STEM concepts will lead to the development of skills and talent that prepare the future Michigan workforce. Michigan recently adopted the Michigan Science Standards for K-12 science education. The Partnership will work to support the implementation of these standards across the K-12 landscape as the project-based instructional approach needed to address the standards will support the development of a STEM literate workforce. The landscape for STEM in Michigan is changing as is evidenced by the Governor’s recent convening of the Michigan STEM Advisory Council. The 11-member council will advise the Governor, legislature, the Department of Talent and Economic Development and the Department of Education with recommendations designed to improve and promote innovation and collaboration in STEM education. The Michigan STEM Partnership has reviewed its’ organization and operations making changes to ensure it will continue to be a primary contributor to a new statewide strategy for delivering STEM education. Paul Agosta Chair, Michigan STEM Partnership State Board of Directors
  4. 4. Page 4ANNUAL REPORT Michigan STEM Partnership State Board Mission Statement: The mission of the Michigan STEM Partnership is to provide statewide connections and communications between employers, educators, students and parents, community and professional organizations, and policy-makers, providing strategic support for the development of resources and programs that provide for the effectiveness and sustainability of STEM education and talent development. Vision The Michigan STEM Partnership positively impacts educational, economic, and talent development by connecting the P- 20 educational system to relevant world-class skills, academic ambitions, and rewarding career pathways. Leveraging collaborative opportunities, assets, and resources, STEM education serves the workforce needs of STEM fields and creative demands of a diverse, innovative, and thriving Michigan economy. Structure The Michigan STEM Partnership has both an internal and external structure. The internal structure allows for officers within the organization to chair critical work committees lead through an Executive Committee. These work committees address organizational and developmental needs consistent with the organizational goals. Coordination of effort and communication is managed through the Executive Committee. Externally, the Michigan STEM Partnership maintains a regional structure that provides for statewide connections, information flow, communication, resources, and program development and dissemination. State Board consists of a balance of public and private sector representatives. Work Committees address operational and development initiatives through strategic action plans to achieve the organizational goals The Executive Director works with the Executive Committee and Work Committee Chairs to manage operations and organizational development. The Board Chair is the chair of the Executive Committee. The EC is made up of the organization officers and Work Committee Chairs, and provides high level planning and direction for the organization. The Region Structure provides statewide communication (feed forward and feedback), provide direct engagement, and disseminate programs and resources at the regional and local level. Regional liaisons and representative state board members participate in the leadership of these regions to support connections and programs addressing unmet needs.
  5. 5. Page 5 ANNUAL REPORT Board Members Paul Agosta (Chair) is the owner of Applied Technology Systems and ATTI of Michigan. These companies have developed, implemented, and supported technology training programs for industrial maintenance, mechatronics, medical technology, and renewable energy to education and industry respectively for 20 years. Paul began his professional career as a high school teacher where he spent 10 years teaching math and instructing teachers in computer technology, as well as serving as a private vocational school administrator. Camille Bryant is an HR Partner for GE Corporate Advanced Manufacturing IT team providing strategic support to the CIO of Advanced Manufacturing Strategy & CIO Advanced Manufacturing Deployment. She is Six Sigma Greenbelt Certified and is a Graduate of GE Human Resource Leadership Program (HRLP). Jenny Deason-Copeland is the owner of Crazy Red Head Publishing Company. She has worked as an engineer and project manager in the telecommunications and mobile industry for nearly four decades. She has three U.S. patents on location services. Her education includes an honorable B.A. degree in Research Psychology, and is a Certified LEAN Six Sigma Black Belt. Greg Chappelle is the Michigan National Defense Education Program (NDEP) STEM Coordinator and the Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) Liaison Officer for U.S. Army TARDEC. Mr. Chappelle has been awarded a BS Degree in Physics, a BS Degree in Chemistry, a MS Degree in Analytical Chemistry, and a MS Degree in Physical Chemistry from Eastern Michigan University. Linda Daichendt is the Executive Director of the Mobile Technology Association of Michigan, a Co- founder of Mobile Monday Michigan, and Executive Producer of the ‘Michigan Mobile Musings’ podcast series. She has been recognized as a member of the Techweek Detroit 100 in both 2014 and 2015, and is a recipient of the Corp! Magazine DiSciTech Award in 2013 and 2016. Mel Drumm is the President and Executive Director of the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum. Mr. Drumm previously was President of the Detroit Science Center and held several positions at the Cranbrook Institute of Science. Mr. Drumm also serves on the boards of the Rotary Club of Ann Arbor, and CultureSource of Detroit. Gary Gilger is the Chief Development Officer for the Michigan Crossroads Council, Boy Scouts of America. Before coming to Michigan, he served as the CEO of the Chippewa Valley Council in Eau Claire Wisconsin and prior to that held various positions in the Chief Seattle Council in Washington State. Lisa Gordon is a Program Coordinator and Career Liaison—Region 10, Workforce Intelligence Network. She is a Certified Global Career Development Facilitator focused on defining pathways to high-demand occupations and post-secondary education and training options. She has over 10 years of professional experience which includes workforce development and college recruitment for youth and adults. Lisa is a graduate of Eli Broad College of Business, Michigan State University with a Bachelors in Marketing.
  6. 6. Page 6ANNUAL REPORT Board Members Jarrod Grandy is the Director of Career Readiness, Kent Intermediate School District in Grand Rapids, MI. Jarrod earned his Master’s in General Education with an emphasis on Educational Leadership from Grand Valley State University and a Bachelor of Arts with a major in History and a minor in Political Science from Michigan State University. Dr. Greg Johnson, Ed.D, Ed.S. is a science education consultant with the Wayne Regional Education Service Agency. Greg recently received the distinguished honor of being recognized by the Michigan Science Teachers Association, and received the 2015 Science Administrator of the Year Award for the State of Michigan. Romulo Juarez, is Executive Vice President at Dearborn Advisors. He has been providing leadership to large health care payers, providers, and governmental agencies (US and overseas) for twenty years. Mr. Juarez is a senior advisor to Board and C-suite with large healthcare clients, has led Connected Health for North and South American clients, managing teams across dozens of projects. He attended Yale, Campbell Lutheran and California State Universities. Jodie Ledford is Vice President for Michigan HR and Senior Internship and Career Consultant for the State of Michigan’s Civil Service Commission. She is a credentialed Global Career Development Facilitator with instructor status. Jodie holds a Master’s degree with high honors in Education including an emphasis on Curriculum Design and Technology along with an honorable B.S. degree in Human Resource Management. Brandon Lucas (Secretary) is an Education and Workforce Development Coordinator at the University of Michigan Lurie Nanofabrication Facility, a node of the NSF-funded National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network. He holds a B.S. degree in Physics from Norfolk State University and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan. Gregory Marks is employed on the Strategic Initiatives at Michigan Virtual University. He is responsible for all aspects of online course development. MVU is a private, non-profit 501c3 focused on serving K-12 education in Michigan. His career includes several decades of leadership experience in information technology at the University of Michigan. Involvement with STEM began with electronics while a teenager. He attended U of M. Paul Mulka is the Division Director of the Michigan Career and Technical Institute (MCTI) in Plainwell. MCTI is a federally approved, residential post-secondary career and technical education facility under the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS). His commitment to, and involvement with, helping persons with disabilities has evolved over his 30+ years at MCTI which began with the position of Job Placement Specialist upon completion of his Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling from MSU in 1985.
  7. 7. Page 7 ANNUAL REPORT Board Members Kathleen Bushnell Owsley is the Executive Director, Bosch Community Fund. She moved from non-profit to philanthropy to join the Detroit/National Community Development team at the Kresge Foundation. In 2012, Owsley was recruited to Robert Bosch LLC as the first Executive Director of its US corporate Foundation, the Bosch Community Fund. Kathleen Rafalko, HR Business Partner—Power and O&G, Shared Services, Black & Veatch. In the past, Kathleen has also worked as a Human Resource Manager at IAV Automotive Engineering. She attended Eastern Michigan University. Jennifer Seger is the Associate Dean for Applied Technology, Automotive, and Technical Education at Macomb Community College. Ms. Seger is an educator and engineer who works to educate and promote Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields to the community. Her engineering experiences include the design of hardware and software for stamping, lasers, and lift & carry systems, as well as the design of resistance weld controllers. She attended Wayne State University for her degrees. Andrew Smart is the Director of Society Programs & Industry Relations for the Society of Automotive Engineers and is responsible for all technical and industry activities with the engineering community in the aerospace, automotive and commercial vehicle sectors for SAE International. He has nearly 30 years of technical leadership experience. He received a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Mechanical Engineering, is a Chartered Engineer, a Member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, a Member of SAE since 1997, and is a naturalized U.S. citizen. Mary Sutton is the Executive Director, Michigan Afterschool Partnership. She attended Northwood and Central Michigan Universities. Kevin Sprage, P.E. is the Area Engineer, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan. Mr. Sprage serves as the Administrative Contracting Officer on all construction contracts and serves as the authorized Corps Representatives with outside State, Local and Federal agencies. He attended Lawrence Technological University. Michael Tanoff is the Director of the Kalamazoo Area Math and Science Center. Monique Wells is responsible for outreach initiatives involving STEM and FIRST Robotics to help build and ensure a diverse pipeline of talent for Consumers Energy. She is also a Project Lead the Way Certified Instructor and licensed Educator. In addition, Monique worked on FIRST Robotics initiatives at the local, state and national level. Monique holds a Chemical Engineering degree from Michigan Technology University and a Master’s in Education from the University of Toledo.
  8. 8. Page 8ANNUAL REPORT Goals Overarching Goal: The Michigan STEM Partnership will be a primary contributor to the growth and development of STEM and STEM Education in Michigan by: 1. Promoting, connecting and empowering STEM education instruction and talent development. 2. Engaging employers, professional and community based organizations, and other stakeholders in STEM education & career/talent development programs and activities. 3. Actively connect STEM resources, initiatives and program development statewide through our regional structure. Goal 1: Promote STEM, STEM opportunities, needs, and solutions through information, opportunities, and successes locally, statewide, nationally, internationally.  Provide relevant data and information  Engage other organizations and providers  Highlight STEM successes/best practices  Educate parents and students about STEM; why it matters  Educate employers about why STEM investment is needed  Benchmarking MI STEM effectiveness Goal 2: Engage and connect industry (business) education (schools), and the community by:  Providing value for employer investment in STEM  Actively supporting and contributing to the work of the Michigan STEM Advisory Council and statewide system to support STEM  Connecting employers with school field trips, outreach events, and mentoring opportunities.  Providing relevant data and information that targeted developments in the STEM Education process.  Expanding partnerships and collaboration with organizations and agencies. Goal #3: Connect organizational, technical, funding, and informational resources to drive STEM education development.  Find/develop education projects that need an employer connection.  Determine organizations outside education and employers impacting STEM  Put stakeholders, employers, educators and agencies together  Keeper of/act as repository/database of all programs (Intern in Michigan, MI Bright Future, etc.)  Work with prosperity regions to connect education with industry in talent development Goal 4: The Michigan STEM partnership will be self-sustaining through grant funds, donations, partnerships, and other revenue sources.
  9. 9. Page 9 ANNUAL REPORT Grants
  10. 10. Page 10ANNUAL REPORT
  11. 11. ANNUAL REPORTPage 11 2015 grants—Hub Disbursement Award List BAY HUB Get’M—Girls Entering Technology & Multi-media $8,810 Bay-Arenac ISD Career Ctr Lego We Do Robotics $7,800 Midland County 4-H Making Technology Creators Out of Consumers $8,100 Shepherd Middle School WeDo STEM $7,800 Arenac County MSU Extension 4-H Citizen Scientist $5,160 Chippewa Nature Center & Midland Middle Schools MAD-Lean Zion Lutheran $2,000 Zion Lutheran – Harbor Beach LAKE MICHIGAN HUB Making Technology Creators Out of Consumers $9,210 Belmont Elementary—Rockford Pub- lic Schools Strengthening STEM $10,000 Otsego Public Schools Heating Up—Solar Cooking Competition $6,440 Great Lakes Renewable Energy Assn—Rockford Public Schools Integrating STEM in Step Up $8,487 Hope College Center for STEM In- quiry Creating, Collaborating, and Celebrating Elementary STEM Robotics $6,375.19 Banger Township Schools ST. CLAIR HUB Carman 9 Ainsworth Project ‘Lead the Way’ $9,939.20 Flint; Carman-Ainsworth Community Schools STEM K-6 Outreach: Nasr Museum Dinosaur Exhibit and Prep Lab $7,500 St. Clair Community College STEMNETICS $9,878.50 Genesee STEM Academy LEGO Mindstorms Education in School and Out-of-School Library $10,953.33 Washtenaw County 4-H STRAITS HUB Little Tigers Lego League $9,992.76 Thomas Read Elementary—Shelby Public Schools Robotics and Coding Computer Programming $9,587 Mescosta-Osceola ISD Shipwreck Discover: Discovering the Future Through the Past $9,985 Alpena Public Schools STEM Enrichment $9,994.94 Alcona MSU Extensions 4-H
  12. 12. Page 12ANNUAL REPORT SUPERIOR HUB C3PO for Students $10,049,40 Northern Michigan University— Marquette Geometry in Construction $9,000 Sault Area Career Tech Center Innovative Vehicle Design Project $7,650 Northwoods M/S Center and Tech- nology Center—Escanaba Putting the Excitement Back into Science with STEM $10,000 Tamarack City Area Schools Keweenaw Science and Engineering Festival $4,645 Keweenaw MSC 2015 Grants—Board Distribution Awards List BAY HUB Capital Area STEM Geekend Weekends $15,000 Ingham ISD Regional Elementary Science Curriculum Development for MI Science Standards $27,000 Science Mathematics Technology Center—Bay Arenac ISD LAKE MICHIGAN HUB 21st Century Robotics Technology for STEM Classroom $12,136,80 Kent ISD Engaging All Students in STEM $11,000 Jenison Public Schools ST. CLAIR HUB Lenawee VEX Robotics $13,200 Lenawee ISD Adrian Brick Elementary School Maker Space $11,288 Brick Elementary—Ypsilanti STRAITS HUB Coding for Kids $28,800 Mason—Lake Mathematics & Science Center Hart Robotics $25,704 Hart Public Schools SUPERIOR HUB Taking STEM Outside with Outdoor Investigations $12,700 Michigan Tech STEM Outdoor Investigations for K-8 Students $10,000 Western Upper Peninsula MSC Recruiting Engineers for Aquaculture Automation $8,000 Lake Superior State
  13. 13. Page 13 ANNUAL REPORT Resources and Financial Management The Michigan STEM Partnership had total cash revenue of $475,000 in 2015 (fiscal year October 2014—September 2015). Additionally, in-kind contributions totaled $13,328. The primary source of funds was through a State STEM grant. An initial grant of $475,000 was received that provided funds for state and regional operations ($130,000) and $345,000 for a statewide STEM Grant Program. Donations were received totaling $960. Donations received for this fiscal year were specifically targeted for support services needed to complete the application for 501(3) status, application filing fees, and establish a banking account for the Partnership. Previous fiscal activities were handled by a contracted fiscal agent (as part of the memo of understanding) as part of the State grant. Moving to tax exempt status allowed the Partnership to act as it own fiscal agent, saving the cost for this service, and operate with more effective fiscal control processes. In-kind contributions included contributions of meeting room usage, website updating and technical support volunteer hours. Per the State STEM Grant Memo of Understanding, funds were allocated for distribution to the five Hub Fiscal Agents for the purpose of Hub and Center Operations. This amounted to $30,000 of grant funds. These funds were distributed per the agreement by the fiscal agent, approval of the Partnership State Board was not required, and funds did not have guidelines for use or reporting requirements. This was a significant concern to the Partnership. Establishing itself as a 501(3) organization and operating as it own fiscal agent will ensure that any future fund distributions of this type will have strict guidelines for the use of funds, reporting requirements, and will be approved for distribution by the Board. The finances for the Michigan STEM Partnership are managed by the Finance Committee, a work committee for the Partnership State Board. This committee develops budgets, develops and recommends fiscal policy and provides oversight to the fiscal operations of the organization. The Finance Committee is chair by the Treasurer of the Partnership. $- $250,000.00 $500,000.00 $345,000 $70,000 $22,000 $8,000 $30,000 $475,000 FY2015 FY2014 Expenditures - 2015 $0.00 $100,000.00 $200,000.00 $300,000.00 $400,000.00 $500,000.00 State Grant Donations In-kind Contibutions Additional Grant Funds $960.00 $13,328.00 $0.00 $475,000.00 $0.00 $7,900.00 $0.00 FY2015 FY2014 RevenueSources
  14. 14. Page 14ANNUAL REPORT Your Donation is More ImportantThan Ever Before The Michigan STEM Partnership ended 2015 planning an organizational transition as prior funding sources for operations came to an end. While formal fundraising for operations and program development are pursued, donations are of critical importance to us. Individuals and organizations interested in supporting the Michigan STEM Partnership through a donation may do so by visiting the website www.MISTEMPartnership.com and clicking the ‘Donate’ button. All donations, in any amount, are greatly appreciated and tax deductible. Volunteer Hours The Michigan STEM Partnership is primarily a volunteer organization. The Partnership began directly tracking volunteer hours in October 2015. The figures provided in the figure to the right are determined based on participations records for meetings and events via a tracking application for volunteer hours. The total includes activities by Board members and other individuals directly connected to the Partnership. Some of the activities included are:  Board & Board Work Committee meetings  Hub meetings & events  Participation and/or attendance at STEM- related conferences, STEM events, or other activities. As an organization, the Partnership is deeply grateful to the individuals that take the time to support the efforts of the Michigan STEM Partnership. If you are interested in learning how you may support the efforts of the Michigan STEM Partnership, please visit the website at www.MISTEMPartnership.com. Advocacy Matters While the Michigan STEM Partnership does not lobby, it is asked from time-to-time, to advocate its view on certain matters and developments. In 2015, the Partnership advocated its support for a STEM endorsement on high school diplomas. This support was based on inclusion of certain element and opportunities that went beyond academic credit attainment in mathematics and science courses. Additionally, several members of the Michigan STEM Partnership State Board served on a state MI STEM committee charged with developing a statewide process that would support the establishment of the Michigan STEM Advisory Council. This Council (appointed by the Governor in December 2015) will provide recommendations designed to improve and promote innovation and collaboration in STEM education.
  15. 15. Page 15 ANNUAL REPORT Looking Forward The Michigan STEM Partnership received its 501(c)3 status in December 2015. This allows the Partnership to seek resources that will meet identified operational and programming needs for STEM and STEM education. The State Board has updated the Mission, Vision, and Goals of the organization and will be working to evolve the structure and operations of the Partnership to improve its position as a contributor and connector in the changing STEM landscape in Michigan. Finance: The Michigan STEM Partnership will be undertaking fundraising efforts to support both organization transition and long- term sustained funding. It is expected that the planning and transition process will take 8-10 months and lead to stable and long- term funding support. Additionally, the Partnership will be working to secure resources that will provide multi-year development programs that provide coordinated, effective and sustainable STEM education programs. Programs: The Michigan STEM Partnership will be refocusing program efforts that are targeted, provide a more stable, effective, and connected regional structure and provide development resources supporting long-term plans that fully develop a continuum of STEM education and talent development activities within schools. Additionally, efforts will fully engage and address under-served populations and communities. 5 Cogs of the STEM “Tree” Page 15 ANNUAL REPORT
  16. 16. Page 16ANNUAL REPORT The Status of STEM—in the U.S. and in Michigan * ** Michigan:  STEM job-holders earn more on average than other Michigan workers. In 2013, the average wage among all occupations in Michigan was $21.40 per hour, compared to $34.40 per hour for STEM occupations  Men account for a disproportionate share of those employed in STEM jobs, and those enrolled in STEM training programs.  Those employed in STEM occupations in Michigan earn $1.33 less per hour less than their national counterparts. Among the top 10 states in terms of percentage of workforce employed in STEM occupations, Michigan ranks last in avg hourly wage for a STEM occupation  In 2013, jobs in STEM occupations measured 7.2 of total Michigan employment  44.2% of all SE MI job ads require STEM skills (Source: Brookings analysis of Burning Glass Data)  STEM job opportunities are expected to grow by 11.8% thru 2020 in Michigan, compared to 8.5% for all occupations  Regarding potential labor supply, Michigan recorded 25,170 completers in STEM degree programs. This represents 16.7% of all degree completers, slightly higher than the national share of 14.2%.  Among the STEM programs in Michigan with the most completers were General Biology/Biological Sciences, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical and Electronics Engineering.  The top three STEM occupations in Michigan in terms of total employment are Mechanical engineers (32,640), Industrial engineers (24,430), and Computer user support specialists (19,630)  Among larger STEM occupations, the highest paying job titles include Architectural and engineering managers ($56.45), Computer and information systems managers ($51.21), and Software developers, systems software ($43.02).  Michigan remains a national leader in both the number of completions in STEM programs (8th) and in the share of total completions that are in STEM programs (9th).  A potential sign of talent diversification, the top five STEM degrees conferred have gradually declined in total share, dropping almost 3 percentage points over the last 5 academic years. Over the same period, Digital communication and media/multimedia (+386), Network and system administration (+150), Systems engineering (+124), and Materials engineering (+105) have emerged as some of the fastest growing in STEM degrees awarded. United States:  As of February 2012, more than half of the 30 fastest growing occupations require some level of post-secondary education  Of the 15 Major study categories, Engineering has the highest median earnings, yet less than 20% of students choose a STEM path  By 2018, 92% of traditional STEM jobs will be for those with at least some post-secondary education & training  23% of STEM workers are women; however, women make up 48% of workers in all occupations  In 2009, 12% of STEM workers were non-Hispanic black and Hispanic. But non-Hispanic black and Hispanic individuals accounted for 25% of overall employment  1/2 of all STEM jobs do not require a four-year degree and pay an average of $53,0000; 10% higher than non-STEM jobs with similar education requirements (Source: Change the Equation)  Women received 29.6% of computer science degrees in 1991, compared to 18.2% in 2010  Jobs in computer systems design and related services, a field dependent on high-level math and problem-solving skills, * A Look at Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Talent in Michigan, March 2015. State of MI, DTMB ** STEM Education Statistics, 2016, National Math & Science Initiative
  17. 17. Page 17 ANNUAL REPORT Page 17 ANNUAL REPORT

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