MENA Technology Transfer Seminar

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MENA Technology Transfer Seminar

  1. 1. © David Secher MENA Technology Transfer Seminar David Secher Chairman, PraxisUnico Principal, Cambridge Knowledge Transfer University of Cambridge Amman April 2010 Lita Nelsen PraxisUnico Director TLO, MIT
  2. 2. © David Secher
  3. 3. © David Secher
  4. 4. © David Secher This Seminar will give you … • Introduction to technology transfer as practised in UK and USA • Experience of thinking in groups about real-life problems and scenarios • Opportunities to discuss issues around emerging technology transfer in MENA • Ideas on how to get further training and networking
  5. 5. © David Secher Our qualifications - Lita Background in chemical engineering, medical devices, including startup companies At MIT Technology Licensing Office since 1986; director 1993 Former President of AUTM Board member of MIHR, Mass. Technology Development Corp (VC funding) and others In 2002 co-founded Praxis (now PraxisUnico) with David Secher, for which she was awarded an MBE – Membership of the British Empire - by Queen Elizabeth II)
  6. 6. © David Secher Our qualifications - David Background in academic medical research, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry Life Fellow, Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge Set up and ran Cambridge Enterprise (TTO) Former NED of Cambridge Network NED of CellCentric In 2002 co-founded Praxis with Lita Nelsen (for which awarded a Queen’s Award for Enterprise Promotion)
  7. 7. © David Secher Introductions • What is your name? • What is your job? • What do you hope to get out of this seminar?
  8. 8. © David Secher Group Exercise Workshop on Perceived Barriers to successful tech transfer
  9. 9. © David Secher Group Questions • What are the barriers to successful technology transfer in your university / company / institution / country? • Working in your group, make a list of barriers and then put them in order of priority • Think about solutions to overcome the main barriers • Appoint a rapporteur to present the results of your in the plenary session
  10. 10. © David Secher Homework! Develop two-minute “elevator pitch” of why industry should want to do collaborative research work with your university or center
  11. 11. © David Secher Elevator Pitch • Why industry should want to do collaborative research work with your university or center • Presenter: 2 minutes plus 2 comments from audience (1 minute each; one positive, one with improvement suggestions)
  12. 12. © David Secher Training and Development of Technology Transfer staff
  13. 13. © David Secher Who do you need for commercialisation? Scientist?
  14. 14. © David Secher Who do you need for commercialisation? Scientist?
  15. 15. © David Secher Who do you need for commercialisation? Scientist? Ahmed Hassan Zewail Nobel Prize Chemistry 1999
  16. 16. © David Secher or Businessman?
  17. 17. © David Secher Scientist or Businessman??
  18. 18. © David Secher Why important? • Speak the “language” • Credibility with business and entrepreneurs • “Interpret” between two communities • Add value to academic offering • Catalyse cultural change • NOT “get in the way” • “Technology push” or “market pull”?
  19. 19. © David Secher Bridging the Gap
  20. 20. © David Secher What else do you need? • Money for: – Networks and training – Travel – Patents • Support of your organisation • Clear mission • Realistic expectations • Time!!
  21. 21. © David Secher Training - Praxis • 2002 Cambridge-MIT project with Lita Nelsen • 2007 Not-for-profit company • 2009 merged with Unico • UK market leader • >2000 delegates • 1-3 day courses in UK, Ireland, Mainland Europe, Australia, India • Taught by practitioners on volunteer basis
  22. 22. © David Secher Networking - Unico • Membership organisation • Supported by fees and sponsorship • Annual conference and other networking • Publications • Represent profession to Government • International links with AUTM, KCA, ASTP, FORTEC, ACCT, …
  23. 23. © David Secher About PraxisUnico • a not-for-profit educational organisation set up to support innovation and commercialisation of public sector and charity-funded research for social and economic impact • provides a forum for best practice exchange, underpinned by first-class training and development programmes and conferences
  24. 24. © David Secher PraxisUnico Members • 121 universities and public sector research establishments, • 60 firms of lawyers, patent agents, venture capitalists and other professionals • 3800 individuals who are responsible for promoting and licensing the intellectual property arising from academic research • More than 97% of UK university research funding is spent in PraxisUnico member institutions
  25. 25. © David Secher PraxisUnico Training • More than 170 expert volunteer speakers have contributed to PraxisUnico training programmes • Since its inception in 2002, more than 2000 UK and overseas commercialisation professionals have benefited from PraxisUnico training
  26. 26. © David Secher The Rewards • For inventor? • For colleagues? • For institution? • For TTO So common model is: 1/3 - inventor 1/3 - department 1/3 – university 10-15% for TTO
  27. 27. © David Secher Culture Change • Brought about through: – Role models – Institutional strategy – Government support – Funding – Legislation – Training and networks – Technology transfer offices – Teaching of entrepreneurship
  28. 28. © David Secher Role of Angel and Venture Capital Investors
  29. 29. © David Secher Where do you get money for start-ups? • Banks? • Family and Friends? • “Doctors and dentists”? • Angels? • Venture Capitalists? • Government funds? • Customers? • Other sources?
  30. 30. © David Secher Angel Investors • Some places have them • You may need to cultivate them • Angels have money AND experience • May supply interim management • They may hunt in packs
  31. 31. © David Secher Venture Capital • Managers of big funds • Like to make $m+ investments • Need to see a financial return • More likely to want to see management team in place • Want big slice of equity (shares), but not majority • Can help access further funding • Reject >99% of business plans submitted • See BVCA EVCA NVCA
  32. 32. © David Secher Sources of information • OECD www.oecd.org • EC europa.eu • AUTM www.autm.org • PraxisUnico www.praxisunico.org.uk • Lambert www.ipo.gov.uk • IP Handbook www.iphandbook.org • WIPO www.wipo.int
  33. 33. © David Secher How to build a successful Cluster
  34. 34. © David Secher “Clusters of knowledge-intensive firms tend to form around large research universities.” Lord Sainsbury, “The Race to the Top” 2007
  35. 35. © David Secher
  36. 36. © David Secher Silicon Fen
  37. 37. © David Secher Silicon Roundabout Silicon Gorge Silicon Glen Silicon Fen Silicon Corridor Silicon Beach Silicon Alley Cwm Silicon Silicon Welly Silicon Saxony Silicon Cape Silicon Wadi Silicon Oasis Silicon Gulf Silicon Peninsula Silicon Sandbar Silicon Slopes Silicon Prairie Silicon Prairie Silicon Hills Silicon Valley Silicon Forest Silicon Desert Silicon Alley
  38. 38. © David Secher Silicon Fen Adapted from David Gill
  39. 39. © David Secher A Successful Cluster? In 2004 24% of all UK venture capital (9% of EU) was received by Silicon Fen companies. Cambridge Cluster Report (2004) Library House and Grant Thornton.
  40. 40. © David Secher World University Rankings - 2008 Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University http://www.arwu.org/rank2008/en2008.htm
  41. 41. © David Secher Documentation • Headline facts and figures: – The Cambridge Phenomenon, SQW (1985): • 350 high-tech firms, emerging cluster – The Cambridge Phenomenon Revisited, SQW (2000): • 2001: 1,350 high-tech firms employing 50,000 – GCP area – Cambridge Technopole Report: • 2006: Number of high-tech firms: 1,500, employing 45,000 • 2008: Number of high-tech firms: 1,400, employment: 43,000 • BUT: no comprehensive, reliable statistical annual survey of investment, growth, longitudinal trends • Cambridge County Council database is employment only – Even years. Survey based Adapted from David Gill
  42. 42. © David Secher Some Key Dates 1859: Charles Darwin, Origin of the Species Diversity, selection, amplification 1953: Watson and Crick DNA 1958: Sanger gets first Nobel Prize 1970: Cambridge Science Park Beginnings of physical cluster infrastructure 1980: Sanger gets second Nobel Prize 1985: SQW, The Cambridge Phenomenon Cluster self-awareness, marketing 2008: Worst financial crisis since 1929
  43. 43. © David Secher The First Spin-outs 1878: Cavendish Laboratory sets up workshop manufacturing apparatus Robert Fulcher, mechanic employed by Cavendish workshop, left to set up firm supplying scientific equipment to University Horace Darwin (son of Charles) assists Fulcher with design 1881: Darwin purchases Cambridge Scientific Instrument Company from Fulcher 1896: PYE Ltd spin-out from Cavendish workshop William George Pye apprenticed at Cambridge Scientific Instrument Co 1966: 60% of PYE sold to Philips Electronic Industries CSIC also sold to Philips, intellectual property passes to Leica Beginnings of repeat patterns: Inter-related spin-outs, indirect role of University Capital realisation often through overseas trade sale
  44. 44. © David Secher Mott Report • Published by Cambridge University 1969, long consultation • Response to refusal to house IBM Europe lab in Cambridge • Reversal of 20+ years of planning • Led to creation of Science Park (1970), SJIC (1987) • New, not smoke-stack industries; University’s permissive approach Not imposing central planning but: BOTH removing central planning restrictions AND providing a sense of vision and direction
  45. 45. © David Secher Cambridge Science Park • Owned and funded by Trinity College, – NO public funding • 61.5 Hectares; 145,540 sq m R&D space (150 acres, 1.5m sq ft) • 2 miles from City Centre • 100 companies, 5000 people • Early-stage start units also • Limited social facilities (restaurant, gym, ATM)
  46. 46. © David Secher Role of University • Teaching, research and “Third Mission” • Long-standing for Land Grant universities • New focus for many UK universities in 2000 • Universities play a key (but often intangible) role in clusters
  47. 47. © David Secher University provides: • People (staff, students) • Expertise (consulting) • Knowledge • Resources (equipment, facilities, incubation) • Public spaces (conferences, networking) • New firms (spin-outs, start-ups) Adapted from Tim Minshall
  48. 48. © David Secher University provides: • People (staff, students) • Expertise (consulting) • Knowledge • Resources (equipment, facilities, incubation) • Public spaces (conferences, networking) • New firms (spin-outs, start-ups) AND a working and living environment that is attractive to entrepreneurs Adapted from Tim Minshall
  49. 49. © David Secher Clusters and Open Innovation • OI supports cluster development • OI benefits from strong clusters • OI may help to address big challenges with clusters • Bottom-up approaches may be better than Top-down • Promote intermingling of people • Support simple projects – competitions, lectures, placements, networking
  50. 50. © David Secher Cambridge Enterprise Ltd – 2008/09 117 new innovation disclosures received 124 patent applications filed 83 IP transactions signed (50 for commercial purposes and 33 research licences) 18 proof of concept projects supported: 12 projects awarded funds totalling £430k 124 consultancy agreements signed £349k seed investment in 8 companies 72 companies in which Cambridge Enterprise holds equity £8 million income of which 82% was returned to academics and departments
  51. 51. © David Secher Some Consultancies … • Cambridge Consultants 1960: spin-outs – Domino, Xaar, Prelude Trust, CSR, Vivid (IPOs) – Alphamosaic, Inca (trade sales) • Scientific Generics, formed 1986 by Gordon Edge – Spun-out Chord Capital, venture investment arm • TTP Group set-up 1988 – Includes TTP Ventures • ALSO: PA Consulting (1943)
  52. 52. © David Secher A Biocluster? ARM (mobile phone chip design) 1990 $3bn Autonomy (search engine) 1996 $6bn CSR (Bluetooth) 1998 $0.9bn CAT 1990 (sold to AZ for £702m) Abcam (monoclonal reagents) 1998 £400m cap CellCentric (Epigenetics) 2004 Private
  53. 53. © David Secher Bridging the Gap
  54. 54. © David Secher

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