Archives on the quiet continent Dr Lise Summers State Records Office of Western Australia GOVERNMENT OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
What are archives? <ul><li>A building or a place where information is stored.  Also known as a repository. </li></ul><ul><...
 
 
 
 
<ul><li>Native title research </li></ul><ul><li>Stolen generations </li></ul><ul><li>Stolen wages </li></ul><ul><li>Redres...
<ul><li>Heritage research </li></ul><ul><li>Family history </li></ul><ul><li>House history </li></ul><ul><li>Graduate and ...
Types of archival collections <ul><li>Collecting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>University archives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spec...
Collecting institutions <ul><li>Can be located within another organisation, such as a library or a local museum </li></ul>...
Transferring institutions <ul><li>Have a legislative mandate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/...
Archives on the quiet continent <ul><li>Think about the type of records you are looking for. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Governm...
Locating archives on the quiet continent. <ul><ul><li>Register of Archives -  http:// directory.archivists.org.au / </li><...
Accessing archives <ul><li>Archives are like a museum.  There will be restrictions on what you can use, what equipment you...
Accessing archives <ul><li>Archives are like a library.  There is usually a catalogue or listing of records. </li></ul><ul...
Accessing archives <ul><li>National Archives of Australia. RecordSearch -  http:// www.naa.gov.au / </li></ul><ul><li>Stat...
Archives in the Age of Extremes <ul><li>‘… more history than ever is today being revised or invented by people who do not ...
Archives in the Age of Extremes <ul><li>‘  Pavel Stroilov, a Russian exile in London, has on his computer 50,000 unpublish...
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Archives On The Quiet Continent: Australian archive practices explained for researchers

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  • Introduction – name, role and institution. Lecture – what are archives, how are they used, where can they be found.
  • Ask for suggestions from group. Primary sources as a prompt?
  • Archives On The Quiet Continent: Australian archive practices explained for researchers

    1. 1. Archives on the quiet continent Dr Lise Summers State Records Office of Western Australia GOVERNMENT OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
    2. 2. What are archives? <ul><li>A building or a place where information is stored. Also known as a repository. </li></ul><ul><li>Records that have continuing value ‘as authentic evidence of administrative, corporate, cultural and intellectual activity…’ (Australian Society of Archivists) </li></ul><ul><li>Records that are original and unique. </li></ul><ul><li>An organisation or institution that collects or manages archives. </li></ul>
    3. 7. <ul><li>Native title research </li></ul><ul><li>Stolen generations </li></ul><ul><li>Stolen wages </li></ul><ul><li>Redress </li></ul><ul><li>Find and connect </li></ul>Use of archives
    4. 8. <ul><li>Heritage research </li></ul><ul><li>Family history </li></ul><ul><li>House history </li></ul><ul><li>Graduate and post graduate research </li></ul><ul><li>Science and industrial development </li></ul><ul><li>Legal research </li></ul>Use of archives
    5. 9. Types of archival collections <ul><li>Collecting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>University archives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialist collections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Noel Butlin at ANU </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>J.S. Battye Library of West Australian History </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Transferring </li></ul><ul><ul><li>National Archives of Australia </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>State Records Office of Western Australia </li></ul></ul>
    6. 10. Collecting institutions <ul><li>Can be located within another organisation, such as a library or a local museum </li></ul><ul><li>May have a legislative mandate </li></ul><ul><li>Should have a collection policy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.lib.unimelb.edu.au/collections/archives/about/collectionpolicy.html </li></ul></ul>
    7. 11. Transferring institutions <ul><li>Have a legislative mandate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/aa198398/ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Work with organisations to identify archives through retention and disposal schedules or disposal authorities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.prov.vic.gov.au/records/pdf/PROS%202007-01%20Common%20Admin%20Version%202009.pdf </li></ul></ul>
    8. 12. Archives on the quiet continent <ul><li>Think about the type of records you are looking for. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Government organisation – state or national archives, local studies collections and local councils. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Private individual or organisation, business - </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collecting archives or internal organisational archive such as a school archive. </li></ul></ul>
    9. 13. Locating archives on the quiet continent. <ul><ul><li>Register of Archives - http:// directory.archivists.org.au / </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collections Australia - http:// www.collectionsaustralia.net / </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>TROVE - http:// trove.nla.gov.au / </li></ul></ul>
    10. 14. Accessing archives <ul><li>Archives are like a museum. There will be restrictions on what you can use, what equipment you can bring, and what you can see. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use pencils always </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital photography is usually OK </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You may need to register as a researcher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some records will have a restricted access period – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>NAA has a 30 year closed access period, which is gradually being reduced to 20 years. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other records may have restrictions due to content such as health, native affairs and child welfare records. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    11. 15. Accessing archives <ul><li>Archives are like a library. There is usually a catalogue or listing of records. </li></ul><ul><li>Unlike a library, you can’t search on a subject. </li></ul><ul><li>Archives are usually described by the creating agency or person, by the type of record that they are and any linked records, and by the file or item title given by the creating agency. This is known as context or ‘respect des fonds’. </li></ul><ul><li>Archives are arranged and kept in the order in which they were created and used – this is known as ‘original order’. </li></ul><ul><li>Australian archives use the Series Registration System to identify and describe archives. </li></ul>
    12. 16. Accessing archives <ul><li>National Archives of Australia. RecordSearch - http:// www.naa.gov.au / </li></ul><ul><li>State Records Office of Western Australia. AEON - http:// www.sro.wa.gov.au / </li></ul>
    13. 17. Archives in the Age of Extremes <ul><li>‘… more history than ever is today being revised or invented by people who do not want the real past, but only a past that suits their purpose. Today is the great age of historical mythology.’ Eric Hobsbaum, Interesting times . </li></ul><ul><li>‘ “ There are three ways of losing your money: women, gambling and money. The first two are pleasanter, but the last is much more certain”, declared James de Rothschild. To the lasting regret of the archivists, this anecdote of Eric Hobsbawm cannot be attributed with certainty to Baron James…. However The Rothschild Archive contains more than enough documentary evidence to support a study of every aspect of the family’s history…’ Melanie Aspey </li></ul>
    14. 18. Archives in the Age of Extremes <ul><li>‘ Pavel Stroilov, a Russian exile in London, has on his computer 50,000 unpublished, untranslated, top-secret Kremlin documents, mostly dating from the close of the Cold War. He stole them in 2003 and fled Russia. Within living memory, they would have been worth millions to the CIA; they surely tell a story about Communism and its collapse that the world needs to know. Yet he can’t get anyone to house them in a reputable library, publish them, or fund their translation. In fact, he can’t get anyone to take much interest in them at all. </li></ul><ul><li>Then there’s Soviet dissident Vladimir Bukovsky, who once spent 12 years in the USSR’s prisons, labor camps, and psikhushkas —political psychiatric hospitals—after being convicted of copying anti-Soviet literature. He, too, possesses a massive collection of stolen and smuggled papers from the archives of the Central Committee of the Communist Party, which, as he writes, “contain the beginnings and the ends of all the tragedies of our bloodstained century.” ’ Claire Berlinski, http://www.city-journal.org/2010/20_2_soviet-archives.html </li></ul>

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