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1811 - Rice Systems Comparisons - Agronomic Effects and GHG Emissions

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Author: R. Mahender Kumar
Title: Rice Systems Comparisons - Agronomic Effects and GHG Emissions
Presented at: The 5th International Rice Congress (SRI research side event)
Venue: Sands Expo and Convention Centre, Singapore
Date: October 16, 2018

Published in: Environment
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1811 - Rice Systems Comparisons - Agronomic Effects and GHG Emissions

  1. 1. Indian Institute of Rice Research- IndiaDr. R.Mahender Kumar Head ( Agronomy) PI- AICRIP AGRONOMY IIRR- Hyderabad, India, kumarrm21364@gmail.com Rice systems comparisons-agronomic effects and GHG emissions Rice systems comparisons - agronomic effects and GHG emissions Panel discussion (Water GHG and SRI method) IRC -2018 on 16102018
  2. 2. Diversity in rice ecologies Irrigated Hill rice Uplands Shallow LL SDW&DW Panel discussion (Water GHG and SRI method) IRC -2018 on 16102018
  3. 3. Focus of Research • To assess the effects of establishment techniques, water and weed management practices on growth and yield of rice • To assess the methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission as influenced by method of planting, water and weed management practices
  4. 4. Methodology • Location: IIRR, Hyderabad • Design: Split-split-plot • Replications: 4 Treatment details • Main plots: M1: SRI M2: Conventional M3: Mechanized • Sub plots: I1: Flooding I2: Saturation I3 : AWD Sub-sub: W1: Chemical control W2: Cono-weeding
  5. 5. Different steps followed in SRI
  6. 6. Testing of Sensor based water management in rice at IIRR
  7. 7. Total quantity (I+Er) of water applied (mm) and water productivity (kg m-3 ) as influenced by different treatments (pooled) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 M1 M2 M3 I1 I2 I3 W1 W2 Establishment techniques Irrigation methods Weed management practices Totalwaterapplied(mm) 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 Waterproductivity(kgm-3 ) Total water applied (mm) Kharif Total water applied (mm) Rabi Water productivity (kg m-3) Kharif Water productivity (kg m-3) Rabi M1: SRI, M2: NTP, M3: Mechanized transplanting I1: Flooding, I2: Saturation, I3: AWD (5 days interval); W1: Four time cono-weeding at 10, 20, 30 and 40 DAT; W2: Butachlor fb Bispyribac sodium
  8. 8. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 M1 M2 M3 I1 I2 I3 W1 W2 Establishment techniques Irrigation methods Weed management practices TREATMENTS Methaneemission(mgm -2 day -1 ) Vegetative stage Maximum tillering Panicle initiation Maturity Methane emission by rice flood water as influenced by transplanting methods, irrigation water levels and weed management practices
  9. 9. -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 Total quantity of water applied Dissolved oxygen Yield Straw Dry matter production Number of tillers m-2 N uptake PARAMETERS 'r'value Methane Kharif Methane Rabi Nitrous oxide Kharif Nitrous oxide Rabi Correlation co-efficient between methane and nitrous oxide emission with other growth and yield components of rice as influenced by treatments
  10. 10. Water saving / SRI enhances carbon sinks and decreases the emission of GHGs• Expansion of carbon sinks - SRI/ AWD rice plants sequester more carbon – higher grain and straw yield, and more root biomass - Increased soil organic matter through SRI practices that improve the soil with more organic matter application and increased root exudates - Association agro – ecological practices sequester carbon, such as green manure production , integration with agroforestry, surface mulch applications, etc. - Reduced carbon footprint due to reduced agrochemical use (including the manufacturing, and shipping of agrochemicals) Mangem Training- Certified Farm advisory course- 26-09-2018
  11. 11. Conclusions  SRI method is the best practice for getting higher yield, water use efficiency and effectively managing weeds.  Alternate wetting and drying (AWD) helps to mitigate CH4 emission by 41 per cent than continuous flooding along with 19 per cent saving of irrigation water over continuous flooding.  Cono-weeding improves the physico-chemical condition of the soil and hence leads to 13.6 to 16.8 per cent increase in yield with 5.5 to 6.1 per cent CH4 mitigation.  Mechanised transplanting is economical in terms of monitory returns by reducing labour requirement at peak season with uniform time and depth of transplanting.  Treatment combination of SRI with alternate wetting and drying and cono- weeding recorded higher net return, gross return and B:C ratio compared to other treatment combinations.
  12. 12. Reduced emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from paddy soils • Methane (CH4) is reduced by between 41 % as soils are maintained under mostly aerobic conditions • Nitrous oxide (N2O) is only slightly increased or sometimes reduced as use of N fertilizers is reduced; N2O increased do not offset CH4 reductions, so GWP is reduced • Total global warning potential (GWP) from flooded rice paddies is reduced significantly Mangem Training- Certified Farm advisory course- 26-09-2018
  13. 13. Thank you. Panel discussion (Water GHG and SRI method) IRC -2018 on 16102018

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