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1612 - Some observations on introduction and rapid growth of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) among smallholder farmers in Kenya

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Presenter: Jean Njiru
Title: Some observations on introduction and rapid growth of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) among smallholder farmers in Kenya
Date: October 7, 2016
Venue: 160 Mann Library, Cornell University
Sponsor: SRI-Rice, International Programs, CALS, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Published in: Environment
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1612 - Some observations on introduction and rapid growth of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) among smallholder farmers in Kenya

  1. 1. Cornell University, October 7 2016 Jean Njiru Supply Chain Network Manager Purdue Improved Crop Storage Project East and Southern Africa
  2. 2.  Population in Kenya- estimated at 45 million  Rice consumption- 300,000 tons  Rice production in Kenya < 100,000 tons  Deficit- 200,000 tons is imported  Rice is grown in Irrigation schemes
  3. 3.  Rice is grown in irrigation schemes that are managed by National Irrigation Board (NIB)  NIB is a Government organization- parastatal  Schemes include Mwea, Ahero, Bunyala and West Kano  Mwea is the largest and produces covering 30,000 ha of which only 6000 ha are utilized  Average production is estimated at 3t/ha
  4. 4.  My initial involvement  Left Cornell in May 2009 after Hubert Humphrey program and MPS IARD  First SRI meeting in August 2009 at Mwea  Launched evaluation and demonstration of SRI  Prof Bancy Mati- JKUAT
  5. 5.  Two farmers who attended the first SRI meeting decided to try it to find out whether it works  Moses Kareithi and Mathew Kamanu  2009 – 2 farmers  2010 – 30 farmers  2011- By end of 20112000 farmers had adopted SRI
  6. 6. Moses Kareithi in his SRI rice field in Mwea SRI Early Adopter
  7. 7.  Mathew’s rice field at Mwea Irrigation Scheme. Mathew was one of the first two farmers who adopted SRI in 2009
  8. 8.  Institutions that support SRI  JKUAT  NIB  MIAD  World Bank  World Bank Institute  AICAD  Focus of support;  Research and extension services
  9. 9.  AICAD supported the initial on-station research for evaluation and demonstration of SRI in Mwea  JKUAT Innovation fund in 2010 provided seed funding for three years to support research and outreach activities in Mwea  Research included yield, water savings, cost/benefits analysis etc.  PhD and MSc students have undertaken research on SRI
  10. 10.  Manages irrigation schemes in Kenya  In 2011 NIB provided funding for SRI awareness in other schemes (previously focus was mainly in Mwea)  Ahero, Bunyala, West Kano and Mwea  Training and awareness creation campaigns
  11. 11.  Training at farmers’ fields  Training of trainers and field visits including staff of NIB and farmers  By 2012 115 farmers were attended TOt  Exchange visits by farmers from different schemes  Training manuals  Radio broadcasts, films etc  World Bank Institute supported SRI trainers from Japan and India
  12. 12.  Yield increases have been reported of 9 tons per ha under SRI compared to 5 tons per ha of the low yielding basmati variety under conventional practices  17 tons per ha under SRI have been reported compared to 9 tons per ha under conventional practices of the high yielding IR variety
  13. 13.  Water savings of 25% in dry weather and 33% in wet weather have been reported  A bag of SRI paddy weighs10-20kg more  Grain breakage- when milled SRI grain has less breakage  Malaria control- research showed SRI has prospects for malaria control.  SRI water management breaks the mosquito breeding cycle. The larvae die within 2 days after paddy fields dry
  14. 14.  SRI contribution to food security  Rice consumption increasing rapidly due to changing life styles  SRI can reduce the rice importation bill

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