6 Sexual Assult Prevention - Risk Management - 6

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6 Sexual Assult Prevention - Risk Management - 6

  1. 1. Managing the Risks A Risk Management Presentation For UT Dallas Student Organizations Sexual Assault Prevention Presentation 6 of 9
  2. 2. OBJECTIVES• To understand the parameters of what constitutes sexual assault and how this relates to state law and university policy.• To understand the risks and detrimental effects of sexual assault as they relate to you individually and to your organization.• To be able to confront the most common myths related to sexual assault and consent.• To learn how to best respond to and support survivors of sexual assault.• To understand the difference between risk reduction and prevention.• To learn how to take proactive steps to reduce your risk of becoming a victim of sexual assault.• To become aware of available campus and community resources. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  3. 3. DefinitionsSexual assault is any unwanted, non-consensual sexualcontact against an individual by another.Sexual misconduct includes unwelcome sexual advances,requests for sexual favors, or verbal or physical conduct of asexual nature directed towards another individual that doesnotrise to the level of sexual harassment but is unprofessional andinappropriate for the workplace or classroom. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  4. 4. Definitions Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, verbal or physical conduct of a physical nature when:• Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment or student status;• Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for evaluation in making personnel or academic decisions affecting that individual;• Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance as an employee or student or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  5. 5. How Does This Relate To You? MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  6. 6. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  7. 7. Texas State LawState Law – Section 22.011 of the Texas Penal Codeidentifies sexual assault as a 2nd degree felony in the Stateof TexasTexas Penal Code available online atstatutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/PE/htm/PE.22.htm#22.011 MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  8. 8. PolicyUT Dallas is committed to creating and maintaining aneducational environment in which all persons who participatein University programs and activities can work together in anatmosphere free of sexual and relationship violence.Sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking offenses,regardless of the motive or the manner in which they areexecuted, are criminal behaviors and produce an environmentcounter to the mission and goals of the University. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  9. 9. PenaltiesStudents can face expulsion from the University in sexualassault and harassment cases. In the State of Texas, sexualassault is considered a felony offense, and the consequences,more often than not, can lead to incarceration for anyonefound guilty.Persons involved in a sexual assault or sexual harassment casecan face University sanctions as well as criminal or civilpenalties. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  10. 10. How This Impacts Student OrganizationsKnowing the facts about sexual assault is important forstudent organization leaders because:• It will help you to create student events that foster an environment of mutual respect and reduce the risk for a sexual assault happening as a result of the event.• As a student leader on campus, other students may come to you seeking support and/or guidance related to their own experience(s) of sexual assault. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  11. 11. What You Can Do?•Do not leave drinks unattended.•Use a “buddy” system where you can alert your buddy uponFeeling threatened or uncomfortable in a situation.•Maintain constant awareness of your surroundings. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  12. 12. PREVENTION Vs. Risk ReductionIt is important to note that the only people who can trulyprevent sexual assault are those who choose to perpetrate it.A student can follow all of the recommendations for riskreduction and still become a victim of sexual assault. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  13. 13. Issues Of Consent MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  14. 14. Definition Of Sexual AssaultSexual Assault occurs when a sexual act is directed againstanother person when that person has not consented, isincapable of consenting, or when the act is forced. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  15. 15. Consent Is...• Based on choice• Active, not passive• Only possible when there is equal power• Giving one’s permission by actively saying, “Yes”• Negotiable at each stage of intimacy: saying yes to one sexual act does not indicate yes to everything MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  16. 16. Consent Is Not...• Giving in because of fear or coercion• Based on manipulation, deception, or lying• Possible when one person has more power• Clear when alcohol and drugs are involved…Substances impair our ability to consent as well as our ability to read another’s signals/body language MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  17. 17. Predatory Drugs• Alcohol is the most frequently used drug to facilitate sexual assault.• Other drugs include GHB, Rohipnol, and Ketamine which often affect memory and the ability to control one’s limbs/ body.• These can be easily slipped into someone’s individual drink or into a group drink that is not being monitored.• The use of these drugs to facilitate sex with someone without their knowledge constitutes sexual assault. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  18. 18. Fact Or Fiction?Confronting The Myths Around Sexual Assault MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  19. 19. MYTH#Only women can be raped or sexually assaulted.FACT#Rape and sexual assault are about power and control and not about the biological sex or gender identity of the victim or offender.Whether identifying as male, female, or transgender, all can become victims. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  20. 20. MYTH#If a man sexually assaults another man then both men mustbe gay.FACT#Sexual assault is about power and control and not about sexual desire or attraction. In the above scenario, the offender’s and victim’s sexual orientations are unknown and exist apart from each other and the sexual assault.Men are most often the offenders of sexual assault, regardless of the gender identity of the victim. The vast majority of these male offenders are heterosexually identified. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  21. 21. MYTH#Victims or survivors of sexual assault are often to blame forwhat happened to them because of what they were wearingor how much they had to drink.FACT#Regardless of what a person is wearing, how much they have to drink, or who they are hanging out with, no one asks or deserves to be sexually assaulted.Remember, the person who is responsible for the sexual assault is the person who commits it. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  22. 22. MYTH#When someone says “no” in response to a sexual advance,they are just playing “hard to get.”FACT#If someone says, “no,” to a sexual advance, then that “no” needs to be respected.Continuing to push, coerce, or manipulate someone into doing something sexual that they don’t want to do constitutes sexual assault. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  23. 23. MYTH#If the word, “no,” is not actually voiced during a sexual act,then the act is consensual.FACT#The absence of a “no” does not mean that an act is consensual.Remember, consent can only be achieved when:1.Both participants are fully conscious;2.Both participants are equally free to act;3.Both parties have clearly communicated their willingness/ permission; and4.Both parties are positive and sincere in their desires. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  24. 24. The Effects Of Sexual Assault MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  25. 25. For The Victim/SurvivorSHORT-TERM•Numbness •Difficulty concentrating• Uncontrollable crying • Flashbacks• Anger and rage • Withdrawal from support• Guilt and shame systemsLONGTERM•Alcoholism/Drug addiction• Eating Disorder• Chronic physical pain (i.e. migraines, fibromyalgia, etc.) MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  26. 26. For The Offender• Guilt and shame• Possible investigation by Student Judicial Services and disciplinary action by UTD• Possible investigation by law enforcement, court trial, and imprisonment MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  27. 27. For The Student OrganizationIf the victim and/or offender are in your student organization:• Decreased ability to be active participants in the organization due to the time, energy, and financial strain of managing the after-effects of sexual assault• Harmful intra-organization splitting along loyalty lines (especially if both parties are in organization)• Tarnished reputation of your organization if the sexual assault happened as a result of one of your sponsored events MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  28. 28. Reducing Your Risk MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  29. 29. Reducing Your Organization’s Risk• Have someone designated to monitor and control the distribution of alcohol.• Establish an organizational culture that does not tolerate sexually predatory behaviors and holds the offenders of such behavior accountable with tangible consequences.• Intervene when you observe coercive or questionable behavior. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  30. 30. Reducing Your Organization’s Risk• Attend functions, parties, etc. with at least one other person that you trust. Arrive together and leave together.• Maintain control of your particular drink. If you set it down or it is out of your control for any period of time, throw it out and get a new one.• Have resources available for the ongoing education of your organization’s members.• Begin and continue dialogues about these issues. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  31. 31. Supporting A Survivor MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  32. 32. Key Aspects Of Support• Listen• Believe• Validate• Offer Options• Focus on empowering the victim/survivor rather than making choices for them• Know available resources MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  33. 33. On-campus ResourcesUnited Against Sexual Assault, 24-hour year roundconfidential hotline- 972-883-2575University Sexual Assault Policy- dox.utdallas.edu/policy MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  34. 34. On-campus ResourcesStudent Health Center - utdallas.edu/healthcenter - 972-883-2747UT Police Department - utexas.edu/police/ - A student who experiences any form of sexual assault is encouraged to immediately call the police (911) MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  35. 35. On-campus Resources UTD Women’s CenterOffice of the Dean of Students-utdallas.edu/deanofstudents/ -utdallas.edu/womenscenter/ grievances.html -972-883-6555-972-883-6391 UTD Police-To file a complaint against another -utdallas.edu/police student. -972-883-2222UTD Counseling Center UTD Health Center-utdallas.edu/counseling/ -utdallas.edu/healthcenter/-972-883-2575 -972-883-2747 MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  36. 36. Summary• Sexual assault is an umbrella legal term that describes a variety of sexual violations, including (but not limited to) rape, attempted rape, and sexual abuse.• Sexual assault occurs when a sexual act is directed against another person when that person has not consented, is incapable of consenting, or when the act is forced.• Rape and sexual assault are about power and control and not about the biological sex or gender identity of the victim or offender.• Sexual assault is a felony crime in the state of Texas. University policy prohibits students from committing acts of sexual assault. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  37. 37. Summary• Remember, consent can only be achieved when: - Both participants are fully conscious; - Both participants are equally free to act; - Both parties have clearly communicated their willingness/ permission; and - Both parties are positive and sincere in their desires.• The risk reduction strategies your organization should take include: - Attending functions, parties, etc. with at least one other person that you trust. Arrive together and leave together; - Establishing an organizational culture that does not tolerate sexually predatory behaviors; and - Intervening when you observe coercive or questionable behavior. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  38. 38. Summary• The best way to support a survivor who discloses their experience to you is to actively listen, believe what they say, validate their feelings, and offer them options in terms of follow-up care and support.• Voices Against Violence (VAV) counselor/advocates can help survivors with better understanding their options regarding follow-up medical care, legal and administrative measures, and can also offer assistance with accommodations to help ease the academic load following a sexual assault.• A survivor’s options in terms of legal and administrative measures include calling the police to make a report and/or contacting Student Judicial Services (SJS) to file a formal complaint against the alleged offender if that person is a UT student. MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  39. 39. Additional QuestionsDiscuss with your organization’s leadership • Faculty/staff advisor • Risk Management Officer (or other officer) • Alumni members/organization MANAGING THE RISKS ● Sexual Assault Prevention
  40. 40. Review Your Knowledge1) Clink on the link below to get started https://elearningpilot.utdallas.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp2) Login with your netID and Password3) In the my organizations box click on Risk Management Quizzes 2012-20134) Click on the quiz title that you will take.5) Click Begin. As you proceed make sure all answers are saved.6) Once you have answered and Saved all ten questions click save and submit.7) Wait for the submission report. Click ok to view results8) If you have scored an 80% you may move on to the next quiz. If you have not scored an 80% you must retake the quiz until you have received a score of 80%

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