Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Learn@Campus: PR for startups
What’s Campus?
Google's spaces for entrepreneurs to
learn, connect, and build companies
that we hope will change the world.
Introducing our 4 experts
Rob Grundel: How to tell your story
Cathy White: Why you don’t need a PR agency
Why you don’t need a PR agency
Cathy White
@cathywhite10 / @Seedcamp
Currently Communications & Marketing Manager
Leading all activity to communicate Seedcamp and actively advising our
portfo...
So, why don’t you need an agency?
Learn how to build your early PR
strategy
PR should be linked to your business objectives
When you start thinking about PR, you need to ask yourself “what’s my goal...
Research is key
• Read what your target audience reads!
• Take 15 minutes each day to scan the press
• Build your own medi...
Defining your story
What is news according to Mike Butcher, TechCrunch
• Competition/Drama: “X will Kill Z”
• Gossip: “CEO...
Defining your story
• Customers! Case studies work well for the trade media, and getting
your client to talk about what yo...
Defining your story
And you should always….
• Know your competition!
• Know how your different
• Talk about the BIGGER pic...
Remember…..
Journalists deal in stories….
• They want to attract readers and increase social presence
• S**t happens – oth...
END
Rebecca Burn-Callander: How to speak to journalists
Alina Dimofte: How to be a great spokesperson
N
How to be a great spokesperson
Your role as a spokesperson
Wearing many hats:
●  A preacher in your goal to grow user base
● A teacher in your explanator...
Tech press:
‘Google’s new two-factor authentication solution: a security silver bullet’
Business/financial press:
‘Google ...
Find your voice
Who do you want to be?
● Funny and entertaining
● Humble and helpful underdog
● Crazy genius
● Aggressive ...
Types of interview
● TV/radio interview (live in the
studio)
● TV/radio interview (pre-recorded
stand-alone)
 
● TV/radio ...
Rules for great interviews
1. Preparation, preparation, preparation
 
●  What the publication is Who the readers / listene...
Rules for great interviews
2. Give the right impression
 
●  If it's TV make sure you're wearing something appropriate
●  ...
Rules for great interviews
3. Know your key messages (and back them up)
 
●  Make sure you are confident about the story y...
Use flags
Lead
●  First let me say . . .
●  That’s a great question, but first let me place this into context . . .
●  The...
Bridging - Answering tough questions
Bridging phrases to help keep you on message:
● ...I would describe it differently......
The DONT’S
Interviews without tears
● Don’t fill in dead air 
● Beware of bad eye contact
● Avoid jargon and buzzwords
● A...
T H A N K S !
Panel time!
Learn@Campus PR for Startups
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Learn@Campus PR for Startups

315 views

Published on

21st Oct 2015: Campus London slides from our PR for startups session.

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Learn@Campus PR for Startups

  1. 1. Learn@Campus: PR for startups
  2. 2. What’s Campus? Google's spaces for entrepreneurs to learn, connect, and build companies that we hope will change the world.
  3. 3. Introducing our 4 experts
  4. 4. Rob Grundel: How to tell your story
  5. 5. Cathy White: Why you don’t need a PR agency
  6. 6. Why you don’t need a PR agency Cathy White @cathywhite10 / @Seedcamp
  7. 7. Currently Communications & Marketing Manager Leading all activity to communicate Seedcamp and actively advising our portfolio of almost 200 companies Currently Organiser for GeekGirl Meetup UK Arranging networking events for women in tech, to learn from inspiring speakers and meet others within the industry. Previously Senior Account Manager, startups, fast-growth & community Working with scaling companies and the ecosystem that supports them. Previously PR and sales lead, Silicon Milkroundabout Marketing the bi-annual tech recruitment fair to startups in the London scene. Previously Senior Account Executive & acting “MD”, SparkPR Managing the day-to-day operations of the London satellite office of a Silicon Valley-based PR firm.
  8. 8. So, why don’t you need an agency?
  9. 9. Learn how to build your early PR strategy
  10. 10. PR should be linked to your business objectives When you start thinking about PR, you need to ask yourself “what’s my goal?” and work backwards to shape your strategy. • Are you looking to drive customer acquisition? • Are you looking for investment? • Do you want to increase traffic to your site? • Do you want to beat a competitor to market? • Are you trying to raise the profile of your Founders to increase connections? • Who is my primary target audience? • What do they read? • Where are my competitors appearing? • Which publications do Investors read? • Could I reach my customers through other methods? (Social media, advertising, word-of- mouth) Is PR the best method?
  11. 11. Research is key • Read what your target audience reads! • Take 15 minutes each day to scan the press • Build your own media database and save links to stories related to your sector • Learn what news they cover • Learn the interests of journalists covering your beat • Know how your company will be relevant to them
  12. 12. Defining your story What is news according to Mike Butcher, TechCrunch • Competition/Drama: “X will Kill Z” • Gossip: “CEO/Company rumour…” • Insight: “Trend X will change the world” • Evolution: “Startup Y is like the X for Z” • Success: “Awesome Y created!” • Failure: “Company X dying/screwed up” • You are The Story: “Kid creates FB” (You are rarely the story though) • Celebrity: Ashton Kutcher invests! • Krakow company hacks Facebook! http://www.slideshare.net/mikebutcher/how-to-deal-with-tech-media- by-mikebutcher
  13. 13. Defining your story • Customers! Case studies work well for the trade media, and getting your client to talk about what you do is a great way to acquire more customers. • Expansion – opening an office in Berlin? Not ground-breaking news, but great for the local economy and local press. • Data – really think about what stories you can unlock from your biggest asset, but create a story journalists will like and not one directly crafted for sales!
  14. 14. Defining your story And you should always…. • Know your competition! • Know how your different • Talk about the BIGGER picture – how your technology will make an impact and what this could mean in five years time • Don’t be afraid to be bold! Say something new.
  15. 15. Remember….. Journalists deal in stories…. • They want to attract readers and increase social presence • S**t happens – other, bigger stories will break! • Try and dodge key dates – such as elections, quarterly results (Apple, Google, Facebook), • Don’t be afraid to be bold! Say something new.
  16. 16. END
  17. 17. Rebecca Burn-Callander: How to speak to journalists
  18. 18. Alina Dimofte: How to be a great spokesperson
  19. 19. N How to be a great spokesperson
  20. 20. Your role as a spokesperson Wearing many hats: ●  A preacher in your goal to grow user base ● A teacher in your explanatory approach   ● A friend who smiles, is interesting and entertaining ●  A lawyer in your vigilance and focus on each word
  21. 21. Tech press: ‘Google’s new two-factor authentication solution: a security silver bullet’ Business/financial press: ‘Google introduces new security tool as privacy fears mount’ Consumer press: ‘Another password? Google brings new codes to your account’ Broadcast: ‘Next, our tech guru Joe Smith is in the studio to show us...;’ Tailor your message
  22. 22. Find your voice Who do you want to be? ● Funny and entertaining ● Humble and helpful underdog ● Crazy genius ● Aggressive destroyer of status quo Remember to be: ● Clear and concise (no jargon) ● Friendly and approachable ● Informative/Useful ● Candid
  23. 23. Types of interview ● TV/radio interview (live in the studio) ● TV/radio interview (pre-recorded stand-alone)   ● TV/radio (clip or soundbite) ● Print/ newspaper (f2f/ phone) ● Email interview   ● Background briefing ● Group briefing
  24. 24. Rules for great interviews 1. Preparation, preparation, preparation   ●  What the publication is Who the readers / listeners are and what they expect   ●  What the interview is for / which show/ what date   ●  Who the journalist is and whether they have an agenda   ●  What topics they want to cover ● Who else is being interviewed/anticipate what they might say ● Read the news of the day
  25. 25. Rules for great interviews 2. Give the right impression   ●  If it's TV make sure you're wearing something appropriate ●  Body language is important    ●  Get the tone right: confident and interesting, but not arrogant or abrupt   ●  Respect your audience - talk their language ●  Be interesting
  26. 26. Rules for great interviews 3. Know your key messages (and back them up)   ●  Make sure you are confident about the story you want to get across   ● Write down your three key points   ●  Use data, case studies and examples where possible   ●  Keep it simple - 'think ink', soundbites, tweets ● Rehearse the day before and repeat the 1 key point just before the interview
  27. 27. Use flags Lead ●  First let me say . . . ●  That’s a great question, but first let me place this into context . . . ●  The important thing to remember here is . . . ●  First, let me expel a myth...   (This is your first answer, almost regardless of the first question)   Support ●  Industry statistics show . . . ●  Latest analyst reports indicate . . .   Wrap-up ●  Again let me state . . . ●  As I said earlier . . . ●  What is important to remember is . . .
  28. 28. Bridging - Answering tough questions Bridging phrases to help keep you on message: ● ...I would describe it differently... ● ...Those are definitely areas we're focused on, but we're particularly excited about... ● ...We're not talking about X at this point, but we are excited about... ● ...I can't speak to what other companies are doing, but what I can tell you is... ● ...The critical issue is... ● ...What's more important is... ● ...I think this is a key point...
  29. 29. The DONT’S Interviews without tears ● Don’t fill in dead air  ● Beware of bad eye contact ● Avoid jargon and buzzwords ● Avoid saying ‘no comment’ ● Don’t speculate it’s ok to say ‘I don’t know’ ● Don’t argue or get emotional ● Don’t repeat leading questions ● Expect the question to deliver your key message
  30. 30. T H A N K S !
  31. 31. Panel time!

×