Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Transformation program

Transformation program for "Samruk-Kazyna" JSC

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Transformation program

  1. 1. Transformation program for «Sovereign Wealth Fund «Samruk-Kazyna» JSC 25 August 2014 Approved by The Board of Directors of JSC "Samrұқ-Kazyna" №113 from September 17, 2014 decision The Board of Directors of JSC "Samrұқ-Kazyna" №122 from September 4, 2015 decision The Board of Directors of JSC "Samrұқ-Kazyna" №137 Number of January 27, 2017
  2. 2. 1 Contents Executive summary 3 1. The need for transformation and goals of the program 4 2. Actions on which the transformation will focus 8 Transformation axis 1: Value improvement focus within the core business 10 Initiative 1A: Implement business process re-engineering 10 Initiative 1B: Redefine the strategic KPIs for the fund portfolio companies 12 Initiative 1C: Align portfolio companies’ strategies with the strategic KPIs 13 Transformation axis 2: Portfolio restructuring and revising the investment approach 15 Initiative 2A: Simplify the legal structures of the portfolio companies 15 Initiative 2B: Bring public investors into core assets and remove non-core business assets and social assets from the portfolio 16 Initiative 2C: Establish new active investment approach 18 Transformation axis 3: Governance 18 Initiative 3A: Increase effectiveness of interactions with government 21 Initiative 3B: Strengthening Sectorial teams. 23 Initiative 3C: Clarify the role, mandate and capacity of Boards of Directors 25 3. How the transformation will be delivered 28 Change management lever 4: Building the required skills 29 Change management lever 5: Putting reinforcing mechanisms in place 31 Change management lever 6: Creating consistent role models 34 Change management lever 7: Communication to increase understanding and conviction 34 4. Transformation Roadmap 35
  3. 3. 2 Transformation initiatives roadmap 37 Change management roadmap 40 5. Program Management and governance 42 6. Risk management 45 Appendix 2: Lessons learned from other transformations 53 Khazanah: A successful sovereign wealth fund transformation that catalyzed an entire country 55 Sberbank: Successful transformation of an individual company in the CIS region, with a similar legacy to that of many Samruk- Kazyna Portfolio companies 59
  4. 4. 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ‘Kazakhstan 2050 Strategy: New Political Course of the Established State’ outlines Kazakhstan’s aspirational target to become one of the world’s top 30 developed nations. To achieve this aspiration, Kazakhstan will need to make a major breakthrough in terms of investment growth and improved productivity of its existing assets. Samruk-Kazyna controls some of the country’s key assets and has a critical role in setting the necessary conditions to achieve the Strategy goals. Currently, the Fund’s operational and investment performance indicators are not sufficient to set the necessary conditions to achieve the Strategy goals. To deliver the required improvement in operational and investment performance, the Fund has developed a program of large-scale transformation of the Fund itself and of the portfolio companies it controls (“Transformation program of JSC Sovereign Wealth Fund Samruk-Kazyna”, hereinafter referred to as the Program). The Program was developed by the Fund’s top management and serves as a blueprint which outlines general principles of transformation for the entire Samruk-Kazyna Group, including the Fund and its portfolio companies. The next critical step will be aligning and detailing these principles jointly with the management of the Fund’s portfolio companies. This work will result in transformation plans for the portfolio companies. The Program encompasses three axes: 1) value improvement in portfolio companies, 2) portfolio restructuring and changing the Fund’s approach to investing, and 3) reforming powers and responsibilities in the Fund’s and portfolio companies’ governance. The implementation of the Program will require substantial changes to the mode of operation of the Fund and its portfolio companies, as well as to the interaction mechanism with the state bodies that are involved in the Fund’s operations. Meeting the Program’s goals will require not only implementing a number of initiatives, but also changing the mindsets of all stakeholders. The transformation of Samruk-Kazyna and its portfolio companies will progress in two stages: in the first stage (2014-2015) the Program will involve the Fund itself and three pilot companies, and in the second stage (2015-2016) the Program will cascade into the other portfolio companies. By starting the transformation program the Fund’s group will launch a process of continuous improvement which will become the new corporate norm after completion of the Program. Samruk-Kazyna Transformation Project Management Office at the Fund level will ensure the success of the transformation program by monitoring progress, reporting, providing centralized guidelines, managing risk and communicating progress to all stakeholders.
  5. 5. 4 1. THE NEED FOR TRANSFORMATION AND GOALS OF THE PROGRAM Key messages of this chapter: ■ ‘Kazakhstan 2050 Strategy: New Political Course of the Established State’ outlines the aspirational target of becoming a top 30 developed nation. ■ To achieve this aspiration, Kazakhstan needs a major breakthrough in terms of investment growth and improved productivity of existing assets. ■ Samruk-Kazyna owns a number of key assets in Kazakhstan and plays a critical role in making such a step-change happen. ■ The Fund’s and portfolio companies’ operational and investment performance targets are not sufficient to deliver on the state strategy. ■ To deliver the required improvement in operational and investment performance, the Fund has developed a program of large-scale transformation of itself and of the portfolio companies it controls (“Transformation program of JSC Sovereign Wealth Fund Samruk-Kazyna”). In ‘Kazakhstan 2050 Strategy: New Political Course of the Established State’, President Nursultan Nazarbayev has set the main goal to enter the list of the world’s 30 most developed countries. As Kazakhstan implements this aspirational development strategy over the next 35 years, it can build on a number of important advantages: ■ A comparatively young and well educated population, providing an excellent basis for rapid labor productivity improvement ■ Substantial natural resources, creating many attractive investment opportunities in sectors with high value add ■ Large neighboring markets (e.g., Russia and China) for the additional products and services produced in Kazakhstan All these advantages have already had a significant positive impact on Kazakhstan’s economic development, with average annual real GDP growth of 7% from 1997 to 2012. Nevertheless, the base case scenario (drawing on the current development trajectory and existing development plans) demonstrates that continuing what Kazakhstan is doing today is not going to be enough to achieve the aspirational 2050 target. Kazakhstan risks falling into the middle income trap – when a country fails to surpass a certain income per capita due to insufficient investments, high dependence on raw material exports, and shortage of skilled labor. In the last 50 years, of 100 countries that achieved middle income status, only 13 (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Israel, Ireland, Spain, Mauritius, Portugal, Greece, Puerto Rico and Equatorial Guinea) have managed to break through and enter the high income group of countries. Kazakhstan has been doing well so far, as China, Panama and Kazakhstan are among the few countries whose historical growth has consistently been above that required to become an OECD country by 2050 [Figure 1].
  6. 6. 5 Figure 1: Many middle-income countries may never achieve the high-income country status A recent OECD report, ‘Perspectives on global development 2014 – Boosting productivity to meet the middle-income challenge’, highlights the critical role of efficient investments into capital stock and greater labor productivity as key factors for sustaining such a development path over an extended period. The ‘Kazakhstan 2050 Strategy’ highlights the need for increased efficient investments into capital stock and a step change in productivity. The national strategy sets ambitious targets: ■ Significantly expand the scale and efficiency of investments in capital stock: increase investments’ share of GDP, from the 2009-13 average of 21.4% (KZT6.1 trillion in 2013) to the target of 30% by 2018 (KZT19.7 trillion). ■ Double productivity growth: from 3.6% in 2010-12 to 6.5% in 2015-20. Productivity will need to grow from KZT3.6 million per employed person in 2012 to KZT5.5 million in 2020 in constant prices. In Kazakhstan, Samruk-Kazyna is best positioned to drive productivity improvements and efficient investments into asset classes that require high up-front investments, long pay-back periods and/or close links to regulatory decisions. International experience shows that sovereign wealth funds manage the efficiency of their operational and investment activities through three key indicators (More details in Appendix 1):
  7. 7. 6 1. Asset value growth. International peers have seen the market value of their assets grow by 10-20% p.a. In 2009-2013. The Fund has demonstrated a book value growth of 7.7% p.a. (book value is the closest proxy, since the market value of the Fund’s assets is not available before 2013). 2. Dividend yield to shareholders. International peers with assets similar to Samruk- Kazyna have provided up to 40% per annum of their net income as cash dividends to shareholders (for example, Khazanah in 2009-2013). In the same period the Fund has paid on average 13,2% of its net income (2.2% as cash dividends and 11% as other distributions to the shareholder). In addition, the Fund and its portfolio companies annually bear costs that may be characterized as distributions to the shareholder in the amount of 20% of net income. 3. Value creation measured as economic profit. In 2013 the Fund was able to continue EBITDA growth, but its economic profit was still negative. The best performing public investors are able to generate positive economic profit. From the three strategic targets above, the one requiring most attention is value creation measured as economic profit. To identify the root causes for this, portfolio companies’ performance was benchmarked against international peers. The results of this benchmarking are shown below. In terms of the first key driver of economic profit, ‘Net Operating Profit Less Adjusted Taxes / Revenues’, most portfolio companies are in a satisfactory position – the Fund’s focus on EBITDA margin has clearly driven performance improvements in recent years. However, in terms of the second key driver, ‘Revenues / Invested Capital’, the portfolio companies clearly lag behind their peers – the amount of capital they require to generate business is significantly higher. This is the result of below-peer productivity, inefficient capital allocation and poor execution of capital projects [Figure 2]. Figure 2: Benchmarking results of Portfolio companies compared to global industry peers
  8. 8. 7 Furthermore, benchmarking revealed three major differences between best practice and the management methods used by the Fund, that contribute towards portfolio companies’ negative economic profit: ■ Focus on reporting and regulation: Working time analysis revealed that Fund employees spend a lot of time on correspondence with governmental authorities, official reporting, and checking regulatory compliance. Only a small number of Fund employees spend their time on assessing the potential to extract more value from the existing portfolio companies. In order to match the performance of international peers, Samruk- Kazyna should become a ‘private equity-like owner’ ■ Passive capital distribution: Most of the cash flows generated by portfolio companies are reinvested by the portfolio companies themselves. Currently the Fund does not actively redistribute capital between the portfolio companies to optimize its risk-return profile, nor does it have a clear vision of the target year-by-year portfolio composition. Many portfolio companies also span multiple industries, have complex legal structures and a significant amount of capital tied up in non-core assets, making efficient management of the asset base difficult. In order to match the performance of international peers, Samruk-Kazyna should become an ‘active investor’, i.e. actively reallocate capital among existing portfolio companies and new projects according to its investment strategy. ■ Functional management model with extensive government involvement: The Fund’s anti-crisis manager role between 2008 and 2010 led to a “manual mode” of management, resulting in the portfolio companies’ functions working directly with those of the Fund in many areas, and also working closely with government institutions (often bypassing the recognized model of corporate governance). This ensured quick changes and an increase in control, but led to a gap in accountability – it is not fully clear who at the Fund level is accountable for portfolio company performance where the Fund has share ownership. The separation between the Fund as investment holding arm and the ministries and regulator is also not as clear as it is for peer funds. In order to match the performance of international peers, Samruk-Kazyna should become a ‘commercial strategic holding’ with clearly defined powers and areas of responsibility. Thus, Samruk-Kazyna’s transformation program should be launched with the following objectives: 1. Portfolio company productivity should be on a par with or above that of their global peers. 2. The Fund should deliver on three strategic targets in parallel: 1) asset value growth, 2) dividend yield for shareholder, and 3) value creation measured as economic profit. International experience shows that improving the way a nation’s sovereign wealth fund works can significantly contribute towards national strategic targets. For example, Khazanah (Malaysia) launched its transformation program in 2004, and Temasek (Singapore) started its transformation program in the late 1990s. Both funds achieved significant results which had a positive impact on the development of their respective countries. (More details in Appendix 2) Changes in the Fund (where about 150 people are employed) will improve the productivity and efficiency of investments among its portfolio companies (where about 350,000 people
  9. 9. 8 are employed). Better productivity and investment efficiency among the portfolio companies will have a positive impact across the supplier network (employing 600,000-900,000 people) and the whole Kazakhstan business community. As a result of the transformation, Samruk- Kazyna and its portfolio companies will thus become a talent factory for the whole country. The objectives of the transformation described above are fully in line with the Fund’s strategy in terms of its social responsibility to the people of Kazakhstan. Better efficiency among the Fund’s portfolio companies will lead to better quality and competitiveness of the goods and services they provide. This will have a positive impact on Kazakhstan’s private and corporate consumers. Improving the Fund’s financial capacities will lead to more taxes collected from the portfolio companies, more dividends to the government, and increased capability of the Fund to finance strategic projects of national importance. Table 1: Measurable targets for the Samruk-Kazyna transformation portfolio Expected results 2019 Asset value growth [KZT; % increase in book value] 630- 1 000 bn 8-12% Recorded dividend yield for shareholder [KZT; % of net income] 190 bn 20% Value creation measured as economic profit Break-even in EVA terms (for 12 largest companies) by 2020 Portfolio companies performing at par or above the global industry peers in productivity (based on three above indicators) 8/8 2. ACTIONS ON WHICH THE TRANSFORMATION WILL FOCUS Key messages of this chapter: ■ Samruk-Kazyna’s transformation program includes 9 initiatives across three axes of transformation: 1) value improvement in portfolio companies, 2) portfolio restructuring and changing the Fund’s approach to investing, 3) reforming powers and responsibilities in the Fund’s and portfolio companies’ governance ■ The transformation will deliver its intended results only if all improvement areas are successfully implemented in both the Fund and the portfolio companies
  10. 10. 9 ■ The implementation of the transformation Program will require significant changes at the Fund, portfolio companies, as well as government bodies, interacting with the Fund The Samruk-Kazyna transformation Program consists of three critical axes of transformation, involving nine initiatives across the Fund and the portfolio companies: ■ Transformation axis 1: Value improvement focus within the core business. Becoming a ‘private equity-like owner’ requires a value improvement focus within the core business, enabled by the following initiatives: – 1A: Implement business process re-engineering – 1B: Redefine the strategic KPIs for the fund and portfolio companies – 1C: Align portfolio companies’ strategies with the strategic KPIs ■ Transformation axis 2: Portfolio restructuring. Becoming an ‘active investor’ requires portfolio restructuring and revising the investment approach, enabled by the following initiatives: – 2A: Simplify the legal structures of the portfolio companies – 2B: Bring public investors into core assets, and remove non-core business assets and social assets from the portfolio – 2C: Establish a new, active investment approach ■ Transformation axis 3: Governance. Becoming a ‘commercial strategic holding’ requires major changes in powers and responsibilities in the Fund’s and portfolio companies’ governance system, enabled by the following initiatives: – 3A: Increase effectiveness of interactions with government – 3B: Strengthen the sectorial teams – 3C: Clarify the role, mandate and capacity of the Board of Directors
  11. 11. 10 Figure 3: Three transformation axes and nine initiatives of the transformation Program TRANSFORMATION AXIS 1: VALUE IMPROVEMENT FOCUS WITHIN THE CORE BUSINESS Initiative 1A: Implement business process re-engineering A growth in value of portfolio companies is closely linked to an increase in efficiency in managerial, operational, and supporting business processes at the Fund and portfolio companies. Benchmarking various process and performance indicators of subsidiary companies has identified significant scope for operational improvements. In order to address this major gap in the operational performance of the portfolio companies, an operational transformation has already been formally launched at three pilot companies at the beginning of 2014 . Four strategic pillars are in the core of this initiative: ■ A “Value-Centric” approach – move from managing discrete, tactical “project budgets” to a programmatic mode of value-driven decision making based on enabling the relevant business strategy. ■ A “Process-Centric” approach –a global best practices consistently across the group and ensure continuity in creating and delivering information. ■ A “People-Centric” approach – attract, develop, manage, and retain staff throughout the group’s ecosystem to ensure development of human capital within the sector.
  12. 12. 11 ■ A “Technology-Centric” approach – adopt globally proven technologies to enable company management teams to make informed decisions based on timely and accurate data. The Fund’s and portfolio companies’ processes will be optimized, transparently structured, defined in a standardized way and clearly connected to key performance indicators at all levels. They will be contained in a unified knowledge base, enabling reviews of their efficiency and providing direct access to information. Similar processes will be performed across the portfolio companies, thus enabling fast responses to problems and simultaneous implementation of changes. This will also ensure automatic control of execution and reporting with the required speed, detail and reliability of information. All regulations and policies related to processes will be generated automatically based on logic captured in process flow designs. The processes will be clearly connected with the organizational structure; allocation of powers will be fully determined; and descriptions will be created of controls and control procedures required for internal controls. This level of clarity and transparency will make it possible to assess personnel needs, as well as the knowledge and skills required for each position. Any discrepancies will be eliminated through development, training and re- allocation of human resources. In order to maximize impact, the aim is to identify and prioritize quick wins as the work to modernize the processes progresses. Based on the value estimates the purpose is also to revise the current portfolio of optimization initiatives within each portfolio company. For the processes, best practice processes from global leaders will be used as a baseline, but will need to be tailored to the particular needs and circumstances of the Fund’s companies. Within each portfolio company, business process re-engineering will be executed in four stages, using a common methodology that includes a set of templates and tools to support execution: ■ Preparation. During this stage (typically ~1 month) the project team is assembled and trained, and required documents are developed and approved within the portfolio company. ■ Diagnostics and design. During this stage (typically 6-9 months) the project team creates a high level process map, identifies and prioritizes improvement opportunities, and develops and details the target state (including target IT architecture and process automation schedule). This stage covers all elements of the system including processes, people (organization structure, skills, etc.) and systems. Benchmarking and standardized analyses (such as the Organizational Health Index) are used extensively. ■ Planning. Lasting ~1 month, this stage results in an approved program of projects to be implemented within a portfolio company. ■ Implementation. This stage can take 12 months or more (the duration and necessary resources depend on the complexity of the project portfolio). At this stage, changes designed at the previous stage are implemented. The Fund has initially prioritized three pilot portfolio companies: Kazakhstan Temir Zholy, KazMunayGas and Kazpost. After this effort has gained sufficient momentum the program
  13. 13. 12 will be rolled out to other portfolio companies. This approach has been successfully applied in two of the pilot companies, and the results so far are promising. Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Business process re- engineering program launched in top 7 companies 3 7 7 7 7 7 Number of entities out of the targeted seven (the Fund and six industrial groups) with new set of KPIs approved 1 7 7 7 7 7 Initiative 1B: Redefine the strategic KPIs for the fund portfolio companies The objectives of the transformation Program for the Fund and its portfolio companies are to ensure asset value growth of 8-12% p.a., increase the dividend payout to shareholders to 20- 30% and as achieve positive economic profit. The portfolio companies’ strategic KPIs will thus also need to be reviewed. Analysis shows that the current performance planning and evaluation system has a number of drawbacks: ■ Excessive number of KPIs for portfolio companies ■ Insufficient number of indicators measuring the efficiency of capital utilization and value creation ■ Excessive number of industry-specific financial and operational indicators. Within the transformation Program these drawbacks will be remedied as a result of a review of the portfolio companies’ strategic KPIs. The new strategic KPIs for portfolio companies should meet two requirements: ■ Evaluate expected value creation and operational efficiency: focus on ensuring both short-term and long-term value creation, and boosting the long-term competitiveness of the portfolio company. ■ Determine boundary conditions: ensure achievement of KPI targets based on the principle of cascading the Fund KPIs. The list of portfolio company KPIs may include 5-7 KPIs involving both boundary conditions (assuming compulsory compliance) and expected results. In exceptional cases when a portfolio company encompasses a broad spectrum of business activities, the number of KPIs could be as high as 10. To illustrate, the following strategic KPIs are planned for KazMunayGaz JSC, the Fund’s largest portfolio company: ■ Economic profit
  14. 14. 13 ■ Growth in the company value ■ Reserve replacement ratio ■ Up-time (upstream, midstream, downstream) ■ Average unit cost to market (upstream) ■ Return on equity, while maintaining debt/equity and EBIT/interest expense ratios ■ Total dividends ■ Lost time injury frequency rates ■ Social stability rating The Fund’s sectorial teams will prepare a draft list of key performance indicators for the portfolio companies. This list will be discussed with the Board of Directors, which will then decide on the final list of key performance indicators and related targets. Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Number of entities out of the targeted seven (the Fund and six industrial groups) with new set of KPIs approved 1 7 7 7 7 7 Number of entities out of targeted seven (the Fund and six industrial groups) with new targets related to the new KPIs approved 0 0 7 7 7 7 Initiative 1C: Align portfolio companies’ strategies with the strategic KPIs The current five year strategic plans for the portfolio companies have been developed to optimize EBITDA margin, not value creation measured as economic profit. Analysis reveals that successfully delivering on these plans would provide a steady improvement in profitability. But a closer look at the five year strategic plans indicates that they are not aligned with the value-creation objective, and would perpetuate the current negative economic profit. To correct this mismatch, portfolio companies’ five year strategic plans need to be aligned with the updated strategic KPIs for the portfolio companies. Therefore, by the end of the first quarter 2015 the Fund will require portfolio companies to conduct a comprehensive review of their value creation agenda. Portfolio companies need to work out mid-term and long-term development strategies, which will be reviewed and granted final approval by the Board of Directors and representatives of the Fund sectorial teams. The strategy review process will consist of the following:
  15. 15. 14 ■ Prioritization and increased focus on existing core business with high value creation potential ■ Substantial improvement in productivity ■ Gradual divestment from value destroying assets and de-prioritization of low value growth initiatives ■ Identification of potential M&A deals which might bring synergies to existing operations without impairing Kazakhstan’s competitive business environment Strategy development will take place in a new format, fully involving the top management of the portfolio companies in the process of defining the strategic vision, KPIs, targets and the roadmap. The process will consist of the following steps:  Build alignment around transformation goals and principles: a series of meetings, seminars and off-sites will take place between Fund top management/ board members and portfolio companies’ top management to openly discuss the goals and principles of transformation, their applicability to particular companies, and the concerns of portfolio companies’ top managers. The goal of this step is to build a full understanding and consensus around the need for transformation and its goals and key principles within the top management of the portfolio companies.  Define the long-term strategic vision of the companies: portfolio company top management will define the vision that will get them to the desired value creation objective. Having full freedom to set this long-term vision and the interim KPIs and targets will ensure full ownership of these goals from the portfolio company management team.  Create an action plan to achieve the vision: portfolio company top management will develop an operational strategy and a roadmap to achieve the vision. This will be done also with participation of key employees within portfolio companies beyond top management team to get a broader buy-in for the transformation Program within portfolio companies. Strategies will be prepared together with the Fund sectorial teams and approved by the Board of Directors of the portfolio companies. Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Number of entities out of the targeted seven (the Fund and six industrial groups) with updated strategy in compliance with the new strategic KPIs approved 0 3 6 6 6 6 Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Number of entities out of the targeted seven (the 0 3 6 6 6 6
  16. 16. 15 Fund and six industrial groups) with updated strategy in compliance with the new strategic KPIs approved TRANSFORMATION AXIS 2: PORTFOLIO RESTRUCTURING Initiative 2A: Simplify the legal structures of the portfolio companies The Fund directly or indirectly owns ~600 legal entities, in a Group structure consisting of up to nine layers. The Fund also uses complex legal forms (e.g., many legal entities in portfolio companies are structured as Joint Stock Companies requiring a separate Board of Directors). To enable the Fund to act efficiently as an active shareholder, the number of layers in which there are legal entities will be reduced from nine to three as a general principle (i.e., parent company, business units, and individual operations). The exact number of layers and legal entities for each portfolio company should be defined as a joint effort by the Fund and the portfolio companies based on legal requirements, international agreements and other restrictions. The targeted decrease in the number of layers and legal entities will be delivered through one or more of the following four actions: ■ Merging legal entities at portfolio company level ■ Merging companies conducting similar activities to create a new portfolio company (Liquidation Asset sales (see the ‘Asset privatization and separation of social assets’ initiative below) ■ Liquidation ■ Sale of assets (see Initiative 2B for details) Delivering successfully on this initiative will deliver four benefits: ■ Increased transparency of operations ■ better liquidity management ■ better leadership focus on the core activities ■ reduced administrative costs by removing additional management bodies, auditing and reporting The Fund will approve the new streamlined legal structures for the portfolio companies at the same time as approving the portfolio company strategies in 2015. Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
  17. 17. 16 Number of legal entities across portfolio companies 593 500 400 300 300 300 The number of layers with legal entities (incl. the Fund) 9 8 8 5 5 5 Initiative 2B: Attracting foreign investors and disposal of non-core assets from the Fund’s portfolio Less than 30% of the Fund’s group of companies’ base is currently listed, significantly less than is the case with comparable international peers. Limited equity participation by private investors does not promote external market discipline in portfolio company operations, and makes it unfeasible to use market value as the basis for objective evaluation of portfolio company performance. Most portfolio companies also include assets of varying profiles: core business activities, non-core assets, and socially oriented assets. [Figure 4] Figure 4: Mapping of portfolio companies assets across industries The Government of the Republic of Kazakhstan under the instruction of the Head of State approved the Complex Privatization Plan according to which 216 Fund’s assets are subject to be transferred to the competitive environment in 2016-2020. 44 assets from attachment No.3 are expected to realize with the assistance of independent consultants. 172 assets from attachment No.4 are planned to dispose through electronic auction. In relation to the Fund the privatization program can help to solve the following problems: ■ Exposing core assets to external market discipline to drive value creation Overlap of sectors in different portfolio companies Investments of the parent company as of 2012, Bln tenge Oil and gas exploration Electricity generation Metallurgy Heavy machinery Equipment manufacturing Physical protection Mining Electricity transmission Logistics services Core activity Airports: Pavlodar, Aktobe,Atyrau Telecom Logistics infrastructure Mangustai- electromunai Ship repairing plant of Man- gistau region Munaitelecom Eurasia Air Batumi sea port Semser security Core activity MAEK Uranenergo Kazsilicon Mashzavod, EcoEnergo- Mash Ulba transport Ulba transport Zhanakorgan transit Korgan- Kazatomprom Mangashlyk- Munai Forum Muider B.V. Core activity Alatau Zharyk Company Core activity M3 security Locomotive kurastyry zauty Core activityTranstelecom Military railway security KTZ express Airports Asta- na, Petropav- lovsk,Kostanai Core activity Core activity Declared plans Core activity Core activity 8.9 41.7 64.8 1.3 11.5 5.8 0.2 88.7 7.3 113 7.8 8.7 Aktubinsk rail and structural steel plant 1.7 9.4 9.9 12.8 4.9 4.7 265
  18. 18. 17 ■ Attracting strategic partners with access to markets, advanced technologies and best practice management processes ■ Releasing capital to be invested in strategic priorities of the Fund ■ Development of the private sector in general and small and medium-sized enterprises in particular, as well as the reduction in public participation and presence in sectors where private companies and competitors are present ■ Developing the share market of Kazakhstan In implementing the Comprehensive Privatization Plan it is planned to use the following mechanisms of assets disposal: 1. Launching an IPO for core assets (portfolio companies) to increase transparency and create an external stimulus for improved performance. In accordance with the 2016-2020 Comprehensive Privatization Program it is planned the withdrawal of 7 companies of the Fund’s group to the IPO: JSC “NC “KazMunayGas”, JSC “NC “Kazakhstan Temir Zholy”, JSC “NAC “Kazatomprom”, Samruk-Energy JSC, Kazpost JSC, JSC “NMC “Tauken-Samruk”, Air Astana JSC. 2. Liquidation of assets by the Fund’s decision. According to the current edition of the Decree of the Government of the Republic of Kazakhstan, the assets subject to transfer to the competitive environment, may be reorganized or liquidated by the decision of the owner in the absence of economic feasibility in the pre-sale preparation. Also, by the Law “On Sovereign Wealth Fund” it is established the obligation of the owner to reorganize or liquidate assets which have failed to find a demand in the market in the three trading. 3. Realization of major assets through competition (including variations). When disposing major assets it is necessary to consider additional conditions, exposure of which is crucial for the continued existence and operation of the privatized assets. In particular, the social responsibility of the Fund can be most fully realized through this mechanism. In order to implement the asset with conditions, the methods of electronic competition, as well as an open two-stage competition can be used. 4. Attracting strategic investors to the portfolio companies. It is assumed that a part of the major assets can be sold to the strategic investors (in particular, the current co-owners, technology partners), however, these decisions should be taken with account of recommendations of independent consultants. 5. Transferring existing social assets from the portfolio companies to the relevant public sector institution the process should be noted apart. In the framework of the Comprehensive Privatization Plan of the Fund and portfolio companies should not be involved in social assets. Portfolio companies have until the end of the 2020 to make such transfers. If any of the social assets are providing critical services, a mechanism needs to be developed to guarantee their continued delivery to portfolio company employees. KPI and expected results 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 1. Preparation of companies determined for IPO, SPO
  19. 19. 18 1.1 Hiring Investment Advisors / banks - 0 4 2 1 0 1.2 Preparedness of investment advisors reports on basic sales parameters - 0 3 1 2 1 1.3 Development and approval of the communication strategy and realization of international investment activities for the respective companies - 0 2 3 3 1 2. Realization of the remaining 37 major assets of Attachment No.3 2.1 Appointment of appraisers where appropriate, and realization of the remaining 37 large assets of attachment No.1 (number) - 0 20 17 0 0 2.2 Ratio of actual value 3) the sale of 37 assets from attachment No.3 to their appraised value (min. ratio) - - 1 1 1 1 3. Realization of assets of attachment No.4 (including liquidation and reorganization) - 60 90 22 - - Initiative 2C: Establish new active investment approach The Fund’s investment process and approach currently feature certain inefficiencies: ■ Portfolio companies play the initiator role on major capital spending, while the Fund’s role is more focused on meeting capital requirements. The function that would actively scan for opportunities outside the existing portfolio companies or for a desired risk-return profile for the Fund is not mature yet. This limits the possibility of reallocating capital across the Fund’s portfolio in sectors where it could have the desired risk-return profile. ■ Individual investment cases are not presented using a standard format. This makes it difficult to compare investment projects, leading to suboptimal capital allocation. There is no efficient process to monitor the performance of individual investment projects, and the roles of participants across the Fund and portfolio companies are not clear. There is also a concern that equity investments /acquisitions are at times motivated by the desire to circumvent procurement rules. ■ Portfolio companies run both commercially non-viable projects (e.g., motivated by government programs and economic development plans) as well as social assets (e.g., motivated by needs in the surrounding society). The negative value impact of implementing such projects for the Fund and portfolio companies cannot be evaluated systematically, but the capital used is estimated to be 20-30% of annual revenue.
  20. 20. 19 As part of implementation of the Transformation Program, the Fund will implement a proactive approach to investment through the implementation of these initiatives: 1. Develop a Fund-level Principles and Approaches on identification and building of new industries. The Fund should assess investment opportunities within the existing portfolio companies as well as potential new investments outside the current portfolio in a systematic and consistent way. The Fund should develop a parallel view on the potential liquid funds available for investment activities year-by-year. Modeling the potential risk-return outcomes of a plausible number of portfolio alternatives will enable the Fund to identify the implications of the main portfolio choices. The Fund should then decide on an adjustable investment principles and approaches based on the risk-return profile of the options. The end product will be a target portfolio structure divided by sectors and portfolio companies, risk and return, and time horizon for investments. 2. Define the investment process for the Fund and the portfolio companies with clear responsibilities in the investment decision-making process. A clear and codified investment process should be developed both at the Fund and the portfolio company level. There should be five key participants in the investment process: ■ Investment committee at the Fund level: – Provides recommendations to the Management board on proposals of new investments team regarding investments into new companies/projects – Approves/rejects investment proposals of portfolio companies which can significantly affect the company’s business or overall Fund’s portfolio standing (i.e., investments equal to 5-50% of the balance of the portfolio company’s total assets) – Provides recommendations to the Management board on any transactions related to the capital of the portfolio companies (sales or acquisition of shares, except for statutory privatization program) – Prepares the fact base and proposes the investment plan to the Fund’s Management Board. ■ Sectorial teams: – Prepare an independent opinion on the results, strategy and investment needs of the portfolio companies – Participate in creating the portfolio companies’ investment strategy, annual budget, defining key indicators and amount of dividends through Directors and other representatives of sectorial teams as members of portfolio company Boards – Create conditions for improving the operations of portfolio companies ■ Portfolio companies’ Boards of Directors: – Approve the investment strategy, annual budget, key performance indicators and dividends of the portfolio companies – Based on the charters of portfolio companies, review transactions exceeding established limits or of specified types (M&A, new production and establishment of new legal entities) ■ Portfolio companies: – Depending on the portfolio company charter and the Board of Directors, portfolio companies are responsible for their own operations/investments within the approved budget. ■ Fund’s new Investments Department:
  21. 21. 20 – Proactively seeks and screens investment themes focusing on a priority sectors defined by the Strategy and Portfolio Investment Management block – Conducts investment analysis on a themes that have passed initial screening and conducts market testing and assumption validation exercises – Proactively seeks strategic investors for a co-investment with an appropriate expertise, management, and technological strength profile – Presents and seeks approval from Investment Committee for investment projects both on pre-feasibility and final approval stage 3. Development of a standard financial model for investment projects and a process to monitor on-time, on-budget execution. In order to ensure a transparent view on the return of the investment project portfolio, the Fund should establish an effective process to monitor the project performance. This process should focus on identifying deviations and risks compared to the approved investment case. This information could then be used to develop the investment process and to learn from experience. 4. Increase transparency of commercially non-viable projects related to core business activities. For such projects, the Fund should carry out a transparent evaluation of the gap relative to the hurdle rate (calculated case by case and externally audited). The gap between the project business case and the hurdle rate should be accepted by government as an ‘in-kind’ dividend during the investment decision process. New social projects should no longer be permitted. Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Strategic direction proposed for investing activities - Corporate Standard for investing activities is approved Fund’s Principles and Approaches on identification and building of new industries approved Application of the principles and approaches of the Fund for all industries New investments in accordance with the approved principles > 10 are concepts approved by the Investment Committee >10 concepts and 3 drafts are approved by the Investme nt Committ ee >10 and 3 drafts are approve d by the Investm ent Committ ee Assessment of investment activity - - Fund’s financial model is developed Development of a financial model for the 12 largest PCs The use of a financial model for monitoring and evaluation of investment projects
  22. 22. 21 Development of criteria for the approval of new investment projects The use of investme nt criteria and standards in investing activities Improvi ng criteria Monitoring of investment activity - - - Creating a database of investment projects and monitoring reports Development of criteria for stopping unprofitable projects TRANSFORMATION AXIS 3: GOVERNANCE Initiative 3A: Increase effectiveness of interactions with government The current governance allows the participation of government authorities in operating and investment decision-making at the Fund level and portfolio companies. This practice could change commercial logic in decision-making and contradicts governance practice in effective international Funds, that is focused on maximizing portfolio value. Decreasing government influence and formalizing government’s involvement in operation and investment decision- making is one of the key priorities of the transformation program. Furthermore, where portfolio companies are subject to regulation in natural monopolies or other markets, their performance is strongly affected by their interactions with regulators. Comparative analysis of such interactions and assessment of best-practice government tariff regulation has shown that there is significant potential for improvement in regulation in specific industries (for example, in process of tariff costs confirmation, divergence from tariff methodology based on “costs+”). International sovereign wealth funds operate better in more effective government regulation frameworks and with a lesser degree of government influence in their operations.[Figure 5]
  23. 23. 22 Figure 5: Correlation between effectiveness of government regulation and government’s involvement in the fund and portfolio company level management bodies To overcome these challenges, the following actions should be taken: ■ Analyze the current practice of the Fund’s interactions with government authorities and identify key areas for improvement similar to global practices in governance. ■ Define a list of actions to reduce the volume of interactions with government, such as amending legislation, establishing working groups to improve industry and tariff regulations, and decreasing document flows with government authorities. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 0,750,700,650,600,550,500,45 0,850,800,40 Freedom from governmental participation in Fund/PC management bodies Degree of effectiveness of government regulation Mubadala Khazanah Самрук-Казына KIC Temasek
  24. 24. 23 Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Creation of GR-function in the Fund and Portfolio companies [Companies quantity] 0 0 1 7 7 7 Reducing the correspondence rate from the Government to the Fund and its companies and requiring meaningful response vs. base line year 2014 [%] 0% 30% 50% 50% 60% 70% Initiative 3B: Strengthen Sectorial teams Currently the Fund has three sectorial teams. Their headcount is 30 FTEs, which accounts for 20% of the total FTEs of the Fund. In global peer organizations the employees located in sectorial teams account for 60% of the total FTEs. 67% of the sectorial team employees currently have a purely technical background, 97% have industrial experience only in Kazakhstan based companies and 41% have governmental service experience. Only 23% are fluent in a foreign language, and one third meet the competence level in managerial skills typically seen as a requirement by the Fund’s international peers. Furthermore, nobody in the sectorial teams has experience of managing successful international companies in the global market context, conducting high quality business analysis or identifying at a granular level the value creation opportunities with the portfolio companies. There are no sectorial team members with a business degree (e.g., MBA) or people with internationally recognized relevant certification (e.g., ACCA or PMA). The current set of competences within the sectorial teams enables the Fund to play its current role focused on reporting and regulation, but prevents it from acting as a fully commercial strategic holding / active strategic investor. In successful peer funds at least 75% of the work of the sectorial teams is focused on value creation, with the remainder including activities such as interaction with the regulatory authorities and other tasks. Toda, 60% of the Fund’s employees’ time is spent on regulatory correspondence with the government. To improve the quality of managing the portfolio companies the Fund should transform the sectorial teams’ activities and focus them on strategic assessments, investments and economic analysis. The sectorial teams’ senior leaders should represent the Fund on portfolio companies’ boards of directors with a strong focus on driving productivity and efficient investments. As well as analyzing portfolio companies’ operational efficiency and efficiency of investments, the sectorial teams’ responsibilities should cover: ■ Determining strategic development areas and long-term goals for the portfolio companies taking into consideration the sector specific global development trends
  25. 25. 24 ■ Defining and developing a strategic KPI system focused on value improvements and total return to shareholder (TRS) ■ Building an efficient model for asset portfolio management ■ Exposing problem areas in the portfolio companies’ activities and preparing a plan for solving them ■ Improving the management reporting system to increase the efficiency of the decision making ■ Improving the operational efficiency of the assets under their supervision, optimizing the debt portfolio and seeking alternative sources of financing for the assets under their supervision ■ Overseeing portfolio companies’ investments and seeking and analyzing investment opportunities and attractive financing sources ■ Implementing a system to monitor the performance of the investment activities within the portfolio companies In order to be successful in the above mentioned tasks, the sectorial teams need to review management accounts, which will enable them to conduct regular performance reviews for the portfolio companies with accurate data. These performance review meetings should be conducted on a regular basis (monthly and quarterly) and should be based on regular standardized reports that include the latest numbers coming from upgraded managerial accounting systems (and not the financial accounting systems that are currently the main source of data). The meetings should also include sectorial teams’ analysts’ insights on how to improve the KPIs of the respective portfolio companies. The ‘Initiative 1A: Implement business process re-engineering’ will be a critical enabler for enabling this in practice. The priority focus of each sectorial team should be defined by the Fund, taking into account the external factors (global markets) and internal factors (social stability) in the area of the specific sectorial team. For example, in the current situation the oil and gas sectorial team should be focused on optimizing the existing assets’ operation rather than seeking new investment projects. The Fund should follow the example of peer Funds such as Khazanah, Temasek and Mubadala in creating sectorial teams that engage global expertise. When recruiting for managerial positions the Fund should focus on hiring people with the optimal combination of industrial, financial, and investment background. For example, suitable candidates would include people who have successfully acted as a CEO, CFO or CIO in a large global company, or who have experience in areas such as investment portfolio management, merger & acquisitions and project financing. The sectorial team composition overall should include experience in both major Kazakhstan-based companies as well as international companies.
  26. 26. 25 Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Relative share of ‘Commercial block’ of the total Fund staff [% of headcount employees] n/a n/a 55% 60% 60% 60% ‘Commercial block’ positions filled in with target capability level [%] - - 50% 100% 100% 100% Initiative 3C: Clarify the role, mandate and capacity of Boards of Directors Boards of Directors currently lack sufficient mandate, independence, skills, experience and authority to collaborate with and oversee portfolio company CEOs. Boards also do not have the full powers they should, including selection, appointment and dismissal of CEOs. Within the Program, the role and responsibility of Boards of Directors is recognized as a critical enabler for transformation. Over the next two years the Fund will change the corporate governance model by putting in place highly skilled Boards of Directors with the full set of required competencies, powers, expertise and skills, as well as relevant responsibility. The following tasks will be implemented for this purpose: 1. Expand the powers of Boards: Provide Boards of Directors with a complete set of decision making rights and relevant responsibility for the portfolio companies’ performance. Strengthen the role of the Chairman and give the BoD the right to appoint and dismiss the CEO and define compensation levels for the management board and employees. Determine the main areas for the BoD to work on by setting clear expectations through the new strategic KPIs. 2. Create world class Boards: Increase the number of Board members to 7-11 persons and lay down the main requirements for new directors, e.g., global CEO level industry expertise, functional knowledge associated with strategic initiatives and at least one director having experience in an international audit company at the level of partner or higher. The proportion of independent directors should be also increased to 50% or more. The Fund’s role in the BoD should be also strengthened: the head of the sectorial team should be Chairman of the portfolio company Board of Directors and members of the sectorial teams (Director and two Vice Presidents) should also sit on the BoD. 3. Establish an effective system for Board performance evaluation. The BoD itself, led by the Chairman, should perform a proper assessment of its results and efficiency. The shareholders should also evaluate the performance of the BoD (independently or involving an independent advisor) in line with the procedure established by the Fund. Areas for performance improvement across the Board or for certain directors should be defined accordingly.
  27. 27. 26 4. Align BoD operations with best practices. Increase the number of Board meetings to 8-12 per year and establish a traditional committee structure: an audit committee, a compensation committee and work safety and environment protection committees (in portfolio companies whose activities involve technological disaster risk). The functions of General Director, Board Chairman and Board Committee Chairman should be clearly separated to enable the efficient work of the Board. In the first stage of the Program (2014-2015), the Fund will develop new methods of working for the Board, as well as models of interaction with all participants. The Fund together with OECD experts has already started developing a Corporate Management Code, which will promote implementation of Fund initiatives for the improved efficiency of Boards. In the second stage of the Program (2015-2016), the Fund will focus on establishing world class Boards by involving directors with global expertise in relevant industries. The Fund has already begun a KazPost Board transformation, changing the principles of work and Board composition. Expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 ■ Approval by the Government of new Corporate Governance Code for the Fund Compl eted Number of portfolio companies, 100% of shares belonging to the Fund, approved new Corporate Governance code 0 16 16 16 16 16 Number of companies out of the targeted six industrial groups approved the results of the GAP analysis and Action Plan on implementation of new Corporate Governance Code by the Boards of Directors of the Companies 0 3 6 6 6 6
  28. 28. 27 Approval of new Methodology on diagnostics of Corporate Governance system by the Management Board of the Fund Compl eted Approval of new Methodology on diagnostics of Corporate Governance system by the Management Board of the Fund: Agree on criteria and set the targets Compl eted Run assessment 0 0 0 6 6 6 Number of companies out of the targeted six industrial groups with Board of Directors appointed in- line with the requirements of the new Corporate Governance Code [Number of portfolio companies out of the targeted six industrial groups] 0 1 4 6 6 6
  29. 29. 28 3. HOW THE TRANSFORMATION WILL BE DELIVERED Key messages of this chapter: ■ Given the transformation’s challenging targets, all stakeholders will need to change their mindsets and behaviors so they are aligned with the Fund’s future operating model. ■ The change management effort will enable the required mindset and behavior shifts, targeting everyone from individual employees to managers, senior leaders, the Board of Directors and key representatives of public sector institutions. By getting change management right at this critical time, the Fund and the portfolio companies will become healthier organizations and increase the transformation’s chances of success to more than 80%. ■ Successfully managing change means improving the organizational health of the Fund by addressing four key drivers: capabilities, leadership, culture, and communication. Change management initiatives will be put in place across four levers to improve these drivers: communication, role-modeling, skill building and reinforcing mechanisms. In addition to agreeing on a clear set of initiatives for the transformation (the three transformation axes), it is equally important to ensure the right enablers are in place for the Fund to execute those initiatives. The change management effort will support Fund employees to shift their mindsets and behaviors in line with the three transformation axes. Research shows that by managing change actively and professionally, the Fund will dramatically increase the transformation’s chances of success to more than 80%. Given the magnitude of change, all internal Fund stakeholders will need to shift their mindsets and behaviors to successfully execute and embed the transformation. The change management effort will focus on sustainably shifting mindsets and behaviors so they are aligned with the Fund’s future operating model. It will target all relevant groups of internal stakeholders including individuals, teams, managers, senior leaders, the Board of Directors, management teams of portfolio companies and key representatives of public sector institutions. Successfully managing change means improving the organizational health of the Fund. One of the most important aspects of successful transformation is to create full understanding of the need of transformation and its goals among the top management of portfolio companies. To secure this understanding Fund’s management board the supervisory board members will dedicate significant amount of time to align these topics with the top management of the portfolio companies through a series of workshops, meetings, and implementation of world best practices in execution of similar transformation programs. There are four key drivers to address: capabilities, leadership, culture and communication. One of the most important ingredients for success is the full understanding and commitment from the portfolio companies’ management teams to the goals and principles of the program. To achieve this, a lot of time will be spent by the management team of the Fund and by its Board members to work together with the portfolio company top management to build this
  30. 30. 29 alignment through seminars, off-sites, working meetings, and visits to other funds to learn about successful transformation programs. As described in the previous section, accountability for each transformation initiative will be allocated to individual line managers (from the Fund, from portfolio companies, or both). The approach is to use the same four change management levers across the three axes. This will instil a common change management approach across the Fund and the portfolio companies and enable the deployment of Fund-level change management experts to support the portfolio companies, ensure knowledge sharing, and allow efficient use of limited resources to achieve success. The role of the Fund-level change management experts will be to support each portfolio company – at the right time and by request – with guidance and practical change management tools. The change management expert team will be formed in Q4 2014 and is expected to ramp up to 5-10 employees as the portfolio companies start transforming. The four levers needed to drive behavior and mindset changes are described in the ‘influence model’ developed through McKinsey & Company research over many years [Figure 6]. The model includes both ‘traditional’ change management elements to engage people, skill building to drive a new level of performance; as well as methodologies to redraw organisational structures and codify the new ways of working. Figure 6: Influence model with four change management levers Change management lever 4: Building the required skills Employees must be confident in their ability to behave in the way the new operating model requires. This can be achieved through training, coaching, on the job development and rotations (usually a combination of these). Currently the majority of skill-building efforts are class-room training and almost exclusively focused on technical skills. In light of the skills required in the future, this approach left gaps in leadership, establishment of efficient teams,
  31. 31. 30 strategic thinking and project management. Research shows transformations that invest a great deal in developing leaders are two-and-a-half times more likely to succeed than those that do not. Initiatives here would include: ■ Employee assessment based on the Leadership Competency Model laying out the behavioral foundation needed by Fund employees, to result in individual development plans, recruiting methods, etc. ■ Change leadership workshops (‘Change Leaders Forums’) for senior managers: a rigorous approach to build change skills across management teams in each department, e.g., through proven two-day workshops resulting in a detailed action plan; regular check-ins; subsequent two-day workshops to review progress and further build change leadership skills 6-12 months later ■ Conference/team building for top teams of the Fund and portfolio companies – a one-off event to visibly kick off the transformation ■ Attracting new talent by establishing a strong employer brand that appeals to the best and brightest Kazakh talents at all levels, not only through salary and benefits offered, but also through corporate values, inspiring leaders and interesting job content. Compensation benchmarking should be the first step to ensure competitiveness ■ Managerial and technical skills developed through corporate learning, including the Samruk-Kazyna Corporate University. The University will be strengthened to incorporate world-class elements, as described in [Figure 7]. Among the first enhanced offerings will be: – Leadership development program for the top 200 senior managers to quickly fill the leadership pipeline – Core trainings for managers (e.g., situational leadership, establishment of efficient teams, strategic thinking and project management, ownership of own development, mentoring and coaching, feedback), developed and implemented throughout 2014-15 – E-learning Portal providing self-development resources and materials for employees to access at their own pace online
  32. 32. 31 Figure 7: The Samruk-Kazyna University will evolve into a distinctive offering, which may include some of these elements Change management lever 5: Putting reinforcing mechanisms in place Employees must see that the processes, structures, systems and incentives they experience reinforce the requested change in culture. Currently, a lot has been achieved for example on re-shaping the key human resource management processes, e.g., recruitment and performance evaluation. However, additional effort is needed to adjust organizational structures, procedures and rewards. Research shows transformations where change is reinforced using targets and incentives are more than four times more likely to be successful than those where no such targets and incentives are used. A common methodology should be used when rolling out the following four initiatives: ■ Principles for the Fund and portfolio companies to redraw organizational structures and ensure the right leaders in the right roles. The Fund will set principles for the organization re-design that will help simplify the organizational structures of portfolio companies. Based on these principles the Fund and its portfolio companies will implement changes in three areas: “lines and boxes” (reporting relationships and spans of control), roles and responsibilities, and boundaries for organizational units (i.e., which functions are performed internally and which are contracted from a provider): It will be necessary to review the organizational structures at least to the СЕО-2 level for each portfolio company, taking into account the experience of comparable companies and efficient management principles such as spans of control (number of subordinates per executive), number of levels, etc. The following rules of thumb will be observed: h ▪ For all employees – across tenure & companies ▪ Impactful – linked to drivers of business performance ▪ Relevant – to your work and development needs ▪ Inspirational – highest quality material and faculty; “wow” factor ▪ Dynamic – constant updates for relevance ▪ Builds capabilities across multiple dimensions – Works on the key performance drivers – Core SK wide programmes – Functional expertise – Leadership development ▪ Timely – deployed/ accessible when people need it ▪ Innovative and memorable – use of latest learning tools and methodologies – Mobile tools – Simulations – Course repository ▪ National – “One e-Learning portal” across SK – State of the art “brick and mortar” learning center(s) ▪ Leveraging a web of partners (e.g., aca- demia and corporate) ▪ Simple and user friendly to enroll, navigate; easy to access for all ▪ Aligned with employee incentives – integrated within HR processes ▪ Aligned with business processes (e.g., IT systems) ▪ Strong brand, internally and externally Value Proposition Capability Model Delivery Model Enablers SK University “Providing best in class learning for all SK employees – from the Fund and portfolio companies”
  33. 33. 32 – Reduce number of levels. Fewer layers are better, as a rule. The number of levels from the CEO to frontline employee should be minimized to 7-8 levels in the entire company and less than 5-6 levels for the management structures. Practice and research results show that top management proximity to line personnel contributes to lower costs, higher productivity, faster decision-making and better organizational flexibility. – Standardize the number of direct reports. The CEO should have 8-12 direct reports; key executives should have 5-10 subordinates. The number of subordinates per mid-level manager should be consistent with the function type: in mass processes one executive per 20-25 specialists; for sophisticated/unique processes one executive per 7-10 specialists or less. Company-wide, the ratio of executives to specialists should be comparable with good practice in the respective industry. – Standardize division types and group divisions with similar functions. The type of the unit and executive’s position should reflect the unit’s contribution to the company’s goals and the number of subordinates. For example, a department will consist of 50-70+ employees, a team will consist of up to 10 employees, and so on. Functions should be bundled in blocks based on similarity of skills, knowledge and/or culture (e.g., an administrative block, a financial block). Corporate functions (legal, HR, etc.) should be independent from business units. – Set KPIs and responsibilities of divisions. The responsibility of each unit should be well defined and tied to KPIs and business process steps. The Fund will also set the framework for appointment of the right leaders in the right roles. An assessment in line with this framework should be performed across the portfolio companies, and hiring new leaders or experts per the result of this analysis should be targeted by Q2/3 2015. ■ Revision of policies and best practice books. A study of best international practices among government holding companies shows that it is usually optimal to systematize and consolidate fragmented internal documents into a series of policy books divided by topic. Existing policies will be simplified and revised in line with global best practices. The Fund will develop 8-10 books (including a ‘code of conduct’ book and a book on corporate governance) that will include principles, purposes and methods of transformation. These books will set the tone of the transformation programs both within the Fund and in the portfolio companies. Such books tend to have the following characteristics: – Consist of two parts: a mandatory and a recommendation part, the relative sizes of which may vary depending upon the topic. The mandatory part describes the basic set of requirements essential in light of governance and reputational concerns (portfolio companies’ scope for autonomy increases over time). The recommendation part describes best practices. – Have the same impact on all the organizations controlled by the Fund – Cover all the relevant issues, do not overlap, and are internally consistent.
  34. 34. 33 The process of developing these books is as important as their content and should be based on two main principles: focus on creating added value for the users, and involve all stakeholders. Khazanah is one of the best examples of codifying policies in a series of books. The publication of ten best-practice “Colored Books” in Khazanah was a key part of its transformation. They stimulated open discussion of the principles, goals, and methods of transformation in such aspects as the role of the Board of Directors, procurement, capital management, HR, performance management, etc. The Colored Books were a stimulus for the significant cultural changes required for transformation and contributed to further penetration of changes into the governmental structures of Malaysia By 2016 Samruk-Kazyna needs to have revised or developed 8-10 policy books, including but not limited to: a. Corporate Governance Code: Authority, procedure for forming and remuneration of the boards of directors and relationships with the shareholder. b. KPIs and performance management: Determination of KPIs for the fund, the portfolio companies and their management personnel at various levels, and their impact on management remuneration and responsibilities. c. Management of capital and investment activities: Procedure for approval and management of investment projects. d. Efficient business process management: Regulation of key business processes. e. Human capital development and management: Approach to improve labor productivity through investment in human capital, and to facilitate social cooperation and stability. f. Procurement: Setting goals for transparent and cost efficient procurement g. Social responsibility and steady resource deployment: Protection of the valid interests of stakeholders and the environment. The sequence of creating these books is also important. Not all should be started at the same time – some should start upon the approval of the strategy, others after the business process redesign is complete. ■ Continued HR process improvements, such as a performance management process to clarify expectations, motivate high achievement, provide timely feedback and development opportunities; or a high potential talent management process using a database owned by the Fund HR Managing Director and individual development plans ■ Other reinforcing mechanisms, such as: – Special awards and incentives to motivate and reward teams and individuals behaving in line with the Fund’s new operating model – Compensation review for employees and Board members, following the compensation benchmarking. Salary surveys in by December 1, 2014 – Salary structure ready by January 1, 2015
  35. 35. 34 In addition to change management initiatives at Fund level, each of the three transformation axes will be reviewed to incorporate specific actions to manage change in that area – helping people behave in such a way that the axis can be successfully implemented. These actions would for example include identifying key stakeholders where communication is needed to drive understanding; ensuring sponsors role-model desired behaviors; helping define the new skills employees need; assessing any additional reinforcing mechanisms needed. Change management lever 6: Creating consistent role models Employees need to see people they respect and admire behaving in the new way. This means transforming the top team, taking symbolic actions, and catalyzing a cadre of influence leaders. Currently leaders are perceived as hierarchical, top-down and not supportive of personal development. Employees can working in silos, reactive and risk-averse. Research shows transformations where leaders at all levels role-model the change are four times more likely to be successful than those where leaders do not. Senior leaders’ visible role-modeling is especially critical in top-down cultures. Initiatives here would include: ■ Ongoing role-modeling from CEO, top team, Board members, e.g., by participating in weekly transformation meetings, taking time to coach and mentor employees, showing a ‘common front’ and sending aligned messages about the transformation and personal role-modeling and symbolic actions embedded in each ‘change leadership workshop’, with individual and collective commitments and peer coaching and support ■ Change agent program rolled out to engage informal influencers in sending transformation messages, role-modeling and capturing feedback ■ Best practice examples of leading change (internal) shared across the Fund Change management lever 7: Communication to increase understanding and conviction Employees must have a purpose to believe in, be able to say, “I know what is expected of me, and I agree and find it meaningful”. This means creating a meaningful transformation story and adopting a language of transformation. Currently a clear story hasn’t been articulated and communicated, so employees may lack the full understanding of why change is needed, what is the aspiration and how the Fund or the Portfolio company will get there. For the purposes of internal communication, successful transformations often appoint a dedicated, senior and experienced communication specialist; the Fund should also follow this good practice. Initiatives here would include: ■ Pro-active alignment around the program goals and objectives by the Fund management and transformation project office with top managers of the portfolio companies. As was previously mentioned in chapter 2 first step in strategy development/renewal will be a serious of meetings and seminars to discuss the architecture and goals of the Program, and their applicability to a particular portfolio company. The main goal this step is aiming to achieve is to build full understanding and alignment around the Program within portfolio companies management teams.
  36. 36. 35 ■ Transformation story for the Fund, first articulated by the CEO. Research shows transformations with a compelling “story” are almost four times more likely to be successful than those without. The transformation story is a narrative that lays out in direct language, personal to the sender, why change is needed, what needs to change, how the transformation will be achieved, the leader’s commitments and expectations from his/ her reports. This should be followed by the cascade of the transformation story, from CEO to direct reports and so on deeper into the organization (Deadline: Oct- Dec 2014). Given the strong relationships between managers and direct reports, the cascade amplifies the key messages in the CEO’s transformation story. Messages should be delivered verbally and reinforced over time ■ Comprehensive two-way communications plan including town-hall meetings, newsletters, blogs, etc., giving Fund employees the opportunity to ask questions, communicate concerns, suggest ideas and be heard ■ Pulse survey to ensure two-way communication during the transformation, polling groups of Fund employees on how they view the most critical mindset and behavior shifts ■ External communication/ public relations, to establish proper positioning of the program and proactively align the external stakeholders and public opinion. Given the Fund’s eminent role in Kazakhstani society, external stakeholders will have a major impact on how internal Fund and portfolio company stakeholders transform Initiative KPI and expected results 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 People transformation Implementation of the principles of a meritocracy through Job Matching The number of companies with completed job matching in the transition to the new organizational structure (CEO-1, key positions of CEO-2 upon decision of companies) 0 0 5 12 Implementation of the principles of a meritocracy through target HR processes [The number of implemented target processes in 12 PCs] Implemented processes: search and selection, performance assessment, remuneration management are implemented 7 12 Implemented processes: learning and development, talent 2 7 12
  37. 37. 36 management, assessment of the level of satisfaction with HR are implemented Implemented processes: management strategy, HR, HR- analysis metrics, administrative organizational structure are implemented 5 12 Development of the shared services center Implementation of the development plan of the shared services center 0 0 0 100% 100 % 100 % Execution of KPI recorded in the SLA 0 0 0 100% 100 % 100 % Development of corporate culture The number of companies with the implementation of projects for the development of corporate culture (ie, the current corporate culture is diagnosed, the target culture is determined, a road map to minimize the gaps between current and target corporate culture is developed) 0 0 1 5 9 12 Implementation of the internship program The number of selected (for multi-tier selection system) internship program participants 20 20 Change Management 4. TRANSFORMATION ROADMAP Key messages of this chapter: ■ Samruk-Kazyna transformation program will progress in stages, beginning from the Fund and the selected pilot portfolio companies and subsequently cascading onto the rest of the Fund’s portfolio companies
  38. 38. 37 ■ Major initiatives of the Transformation program described in this document are expected to last until the end of 2017. Overall program is long-term and is expected to last over 5 years The transformation includes the description of activities, their timeline, and responsible individuals to deliver the goals of the transformation. These activities will be detailed further into more specific steps, after initiative teams are formed. The roadmap covers both initiatives (the “what” has to change part of the transformation) as well as change management (the “how” of the transformation). This roadmap is starting from the basis that the already done work on business process re-engineering has created. It spans a four year period until the end of 2018 and is divided into three stages [Figure 8]: 5. Preliminary stage: Final preparation stage at Fund level, continuing with the pilot portfolio companies (Q4 2014 – Q1 2015) 6. Full rollout: Changes at the Fund level and peak at pilot portfolio companies (2015) 7. First results of transformation (2015-16 onwards). Overview of stages in roadmap is shown below. Figure 8: Three stages of the transformation Transformation initiatives roadmap During preliminary stage the project governance and infrastructure will be adjusted to the new expanded scope and complexity. This includes recruiting the additional people to the Samruk- Kazyna transformation PMO and appointing responsible for each initiative. Other critical activities at this time will include approving a list of KPIs at the Fund level. The portfolio companies’ legal structure will be also reviewed and the action plan for its simplification will be developed; non-core and social assets will be identified for subsequent disposal. Also in
  39. 39. 38 late 2014 the review and approval process will begin for the legislative amendments that are necessary for the transformation to be successful. Beginning in 2015 the larger changes at the Fund level starts showing as well as in the three selected pilot portfolio companies (KMG, KTZh, KazPost): development a new Fund’s investment strategy and new employees will gradually be hired in sectorial teams who will be one of the key elements in success of the transformation program. At the same time, changes will be made in the powers and composition of the Boards of Directors with a view making them closer to best practices. At the Fund and in portfolio companies, the new KPIs and their targets will be approved, which will result in new strategies being developed for these companies. The implementation of new business processes based on best global practices starts in H2 2015 with a projected completion being in 2016. The disposal of non- core and social assets will start in mid-2016 to be completed by the end of 2017. In 2016 the transformation process will encompass all the portfolio companies. Most activities within the Group are expected to be completed by the end of 2016. Disposal of non-core and social assets, business process reengineering in the wave 2 portfolio companies, and the IPOs of core assets. are expected to be over by the end of 2018. [Figure 9]
  40. 40. 39 Figure 9: Transformation initiatives roadmap
  41. 41. 40 Change management roadmap The change management roadmap shows the activities meant at facilitating, supporting, and reinforcing the transformation of the Fund and its portfolio companies. These activities will start with the Fund in Q4 2014 and then cascade onto portfolio companies at the end of Q1 2015. At the Fund level, top management will begin by developing a transformation story and an internal two-way communication plan. Top management will spearhead the transformation by continuously role-modeling the new behaviors. By conducting employee assessments, management will identify potential leaders who will then be trained to become change agents who will drive the transformation. When transformation kicks off at portfolio companies in Q1 2015, the transformation story will be cascaded through these organizations, supported by extensive communication, both internally and externally. The required new skills will be built through extensive training. Best practice examples will be diligently collected and widely shared within the Group. As the transformation progresses, its results will be reinforced through changes in the organization structures and processes and codified in internal books and policies. [Figure 10]
  42. 42. 41 Figure 10: Change management roadmap
  43. 43. 42 5. Program Management and governance Key messages of this chapter: ■ As the transformation program moves to the next stage of implementation existing program management structures should be adjusted to reflect additional scope and scale requirements. ■ Samruk-Kazyna Transformation Project Management Office at the Fund level ensures the success of the transformation program through monitoring of progress, reporting, centralized guidelines development and expert support to the owners of initiatives. ■ Effective operation of PMO will require resources (both people and monetary) and governance mechanisms (regular meetings, opportunity to elevate resolution of key decisions to the steering committee). As Samruk-Kazyna transformation program transitions from the current business process re- engineering focused phase to include also more strategic levers, the program governance should be updated to reflect the additional scope and complexity. The original program management footprint established to serve the operational transformation should be continued going forward: ■ One Samruk-Kazyna transformation program PMO at the Fund level (core transformation team which is responsible for supporting the whole transformation and for transformation at the Fund level) ■ One PMO within each Tier 2 portfolio company (responsible for supporting the transformation in portfolio companies) Samruk-Kazyna Transformation Project Management Office (PMO) mandate is to support the Fund and the portfolio companies in implementation of the transformation program through: ■ Development of common guidelines in high value / high risk areas despite the diversity of the portfolio companies business activities ■ Expert support to initiative owners on implementation and challenge them on the content decisions ■ Tracking and progress reporting against the planned timelines and targets at the Fund level ■ Content development for the communication related to the transformation program ■ Organizing key meetings in-line with the planned working rhythm To deliver on this mandate the Samruk-Kazyna Transformation PMO should consist of a team of 10-15 full time employees [Figure 11] led by Transformation Program Director. The role that these people play should be divided into three categories: Project management related roles, cross cutting methodological and CxO councel / Business Process Owner –type of roles. Each of these people would be interacting with external resources on as needed basis in order to get specific expertise or capacity during a certain moment during the project.
  44. 44. 43 Figure 11: Roles and responsibilities in the Samruk-Kazuna Transformation PMO The Samruk-Kazyna Transformation PMO would interact with the other parties in the following way [Figure 12]: ■ When developing the common principles and cross cutting methodology, they would collaborate systematically with the initiative owners in the Fund and in the portfolio companies to collect input, discuss the key choices, get portfolio company specific understanding and share global best practice experience. This would ensure highest possible quality as well as buy-in from the different parties. Common principles cross cutting methodology gets approved by Transformation Steering Committee, after which they get implemented by the initiative owners with the support and quality control of the Samruk-Kazyna Transformation PMO resources ■ When providing expert support for the initiative owners, either by themselves or in combination with external resources, they would interact either directly or in combination with the portfolio company PMO. This model of working could include either content related guidance or very hands-on support to solve one-off challenge or for a short period of time to accelerate the development in a critical areas When doing tracking & reporting the progress, at the Fund directly collecting the status information from the initiative owners and with regards to the portfolio companies from the portfolio company specific PMO, which would collect it in their own portfolio company. Tracking and reporting will be done both against the deliverables and deadlines, by assessing compliance to the agreed guidelines and cross-cutting methodology, as well as against the expected results Roles Transformation program director Communication Key Responsibilities ▪ Provide day-to-day leadership for the operations of the program ▪ Coordinate resources and schedule with senior management ▪ Escalate and resolve problems in Fund and/or Portfolio companies transformation ▪ Develop communication master-plan (internal and external) ▪ Spark change – energize organization(s) around compelling vision for change, celebrate achievements, and build/maintain momentum ▪ Develop communication content and communicate impact of change ▪ Define guidelines for HR processes and people related changes ▪ Ensure compliance to common principles, help to solve problems ▪ Define the methodology for business processes reengineering including process mapping, and definition, technology enablement, etc. ▪ Provide expert knowledge to initiative owners ▪ Coordinate usage of external resourcing Management accounting ▪ Define guidelines for management accounting, finance function and treasury transformation ▪ Help to transform investment case modeling HR / people processes Business Process Re- engineering methodology Tracking and reporting ▪ Keep the transformation on track by actively monitoring completion of deliverables ▪ Communicate progress during status meetings ▪ Define guidelines for establishing procedures for purchasing ▪ Provide expert knowledge to optimize high priority cost categories Purchasing ▪ Perform assessment of best practices for delayering of legal structures ▪ Provide expert support regarding legislation changes for transformation Legal Project management Methodological support CxO counsels, content experts in high value areas critical to implementation Role type Change management facilitator ▪ Manage the change management part of the transformation ▪ Facilitation of application of change management tools and instruments Technology enablement ▪ Define approach towards IT and other technology enablement ▪ Provide expert opinion on technology solutions related to core processes
  45. 45. 44 Figure 12: Transformation program governance model Main responsibility on following up the progress and results of the transformation follows the normal lines of the corporate governance, i.e., transformation program related progress reviews within the portfolio companies happen at the management board and portfolio company board of directors levels, and similarly at the Fund level the Fund’s management board and the Fund’s board of directors. In order to ensure coordination and boarder transformation program related discussions there should be regular monthly meetings between the Samruk-Kazyna transformation PMO and the portfolio company PMOs, and quarterly between the Fund top management and the portfolio company top management in Modernization board meeting [Figure 13].
  46. 46. 45 Figure 13: Program governance, mode of operation The Samruk-Kazyna transformation PMO will have an implementation budget that will consist of three major buckets: ■ Full staff costs that include up to 10-15 senior experts with global experience in transformations in such areas as tracking & reporting, communications, process mapping, technology enablement, management accounting, purchasing, human resources and legal ■ External support costs that include management consulting (e.g., advise on the choice of portfolio company specific strategic KPIs), Business Process Re-engineering and IT consulting (e.g., best practice process maps and capacity to help to apply them) as well as function-specific consulting (e.g., specific legal advice). This would allow efficient use of knowledge and capabilities and guarantee the implementation of best practices and their transfer to fund and portfolio companies’ employees. ■ Training and communication expenses that include trainings on functional topics, interpersonal skills and milestone trainings for Fund employees. Communications budget will support execution of communications master plan – development of various communication instruments (e.g., web, posters, newspapers and videos) By initial estimates the Fund will require USD ~50 mln. to support the transformation program. This expected budget covers Fund’s PMO staff costs, recruitment of world-class industrial experts to sectorial teams, external support, training and other expenses. Meetings Participants Steering Committee Meeting CEO, 1st deputy CEOs, Program director Sectorial team meeting Program director, analyst, sector team heads Ad-Hoc meetings Role description ▪ Reviews program status reports ▪ Makes key decisions ▪ Reviews progress status for each initiative in which the sectorial team is involved in ▪ Reviews implementation plan ▪ Meets with project owners as needed to review project status and resolve the issues Frequency Each month Each two weeks On demand On demand Modernization board meeting CEO, 1st deputy CEOs, CEOs and PMO directors of portfolio companies ▪ Reviews overall transformation program status across the Fund and the Portfolio companies ▪ Facilitates experience sharing ▪ Debates any directional changes on the program Once in 2-3 months Initiative owners meeting Program Director, analyst, initiative owners ▪ Reviews progress status for each initiative that is driven by the support function heads ▪ Reviews implementation plan Each two weeks Transformation PMO core team meeting Core 5-10 members of the Fund’s PMO ▪ Regular status meeting ▪ Elevates the issues to the steering committee Each week Fund and portfolio companies PMO Fund PMO, PMO directors of portfolio companies ▪ Reviews transformation status for each portfolio company and the Fund ▪ Discusses any required changes / shares experience on the common principles and methodology Each month
  47. 47. 46 6. RISK MANAGEMENT Key messages of this chapter: ■ Preliminary analysis has identified a number of key risks related to the transformation process. The most severe risks relate to ensuring employees are committed to the change, and to required legislative changes ■ The Fund will implement a risk management process consisting of four steps: identification; assessment and prioritization; mitigation; monitoring and reporting. Implementing large-scale transformation programs always entails significant risks. In order to reduce the probability, as well as the potential impact of occurrence of risks, the Fund has worked to identify key risks. Identified risks can be divided into those related to multiple initiatives and those related to a single initiative. The Project Management Office will assign risks related to many initiatives to the Fund’s Board members, while individual initiative leaders will be responsible for risk management of their own initiatives. For each identified risk mitigation plans will be approved and implemented, actively utilizing elements of the Fund’s existing risk management system, cinluding methodologies, models, frameworks for assigning responsibility and controlling implementation etc. Preliminary analysis has identified and assessed the following risk drivers related to many initiatives: Risk Risk factor Probability1 Impact2 Mitigation Limited top management involvement Divergent understanding of goals by top management 4 5 ■ Involve all top managers in the decision making process on the program implementation ■ Conduct top team alignment workshops Adverse reaction of employees Resistance of employees to changes 4 5 ■ Actively communicate the need for change ■ Use informal leaders and change agents to support 1 On scale: 1 = 0-5% probability, 2 = 5-25%, 3 = 25-40%, 4 = 40-80%, 5 = 80-100% 2 On scale: 1 = minimal, 2 = limited, 3 = medium, 4 = considerable, 5 = critical
  48. 48. 47 program implementation Lack of resources Lack of necessary knowledge and skills (Project management, etc.) 3 3 ■ Search globally for qualified staff with experience in similar programs ■ Train employees by implementing a system for developing skills and competencies (trainings, mentor programs etc.) Lack of resources to complete the program 1 3 ■ Identify the required resources (including outside resources) before the start of the program implementation Operations are disrupted as resources are re-allocated to the program 5 3 ■ Clearly assign responsibility for the implementation of initiatives ■ Implement a structured process for managing the program implementation effectiveness Adverse external drivers Required changes in the law do not take place 3 5 ■ Agree on understanding of the transformation with the government ■ Ensure personal involvement from the Prime Minister in resolving controversial issues on changes in the law
  49. 49. 48 Excessive involvement of the authorities in managing the program 3 3 ■ Provide regular feedback with the authorities involved Negative press coverage 1 2 ■ Carry out preemptive explanatory work with the press and the public Certain risks related to specific initiatives were also identified: Initiative Risk description Probability3 Impact4 Mitigation actions 1А New best practice- based business processes are not followed by staff 4 3 ■ Automate the processes where feasible ■ Invest sufficient resources in re- education and building new skills ■ Ensure regular monitoring of process performance 1B Portfolio companies’ KPIs are not aligned with the Fund’s KPIs 2 4 ■ Cascade the three new KPIs on the portfolio company level ■ Approve KPIs and portfolio company targets on the companies’ Boards of Directors in the presence of 3 On scale: 1 = 0-5% probability, 2 = 5-25%, 3 = 25-40%, 4 = 40-80%, 5 = 80-100% 4 On scale: 1 = minimal, 2 = limited, 3 = medium, 4 = considerable, 5 = critical
  50. 50. 49 sectorial team members 1C Portfolio companies do not divest or restructure value-destroying assets 4 4 ■ Develop and approve asset optimization plans on the Board of Directors level ■ Meet with portfolio companies’ management to educate them on the impact of asset optimization initiative on the KPIs 2A Loss of manageability or financial losses due to the changes in the current ownership structure 4 2 ■ Proactively study legal, financial, and operational consequences of the changes in the ownership structure and develop a detailed plan on changing the ownership structure taking into account the likely consequences 2B Potential resistance from outside Samruk-Kazyna to transferring social assets from the holding 4 2 ■ Ensure support from the government for transfer of social assets ■ Sign agreements with local authorities on the transfer of social
  51. 51. 50 obligations and produce detailed plans on asset disposal 2C Management of cash-rich companies resist transferring resources to the Fund 5 3 ■ Establish clear dividend policies for portfolio companies Inability to decline to engage in projects with negative EVA 4 4 ■ All projects with negative EVA must be formally approved by: a) the requesting party, b) the Fund’s Board of Directors ■ The negative EVA resulting from such projects must be counted as a dividend-in-kind 3A Legislative changes required to complete the transformation are delayed 3 5 ■ Establish a joint working group with the authorities to develop proposals on legislative changes ■ Prioritize key changes in the law, as well as changes that do not need a protracted approval process

    Be the first to comment

    Login to see the comments

Transformation program for "Samruk-Kazyna" JSC

Views

Total views

384

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

23

Actions

Downloads

14

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×