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Funders Partnering to Drive Innovation in
Job Training & Mobility:
Job Opportunity Investment Network (JOIN)
Social Innova...
Today’s Game Plan
1. Introductions 10-15 min
• Name, Organization, Location
• What are you most excited about learning at ...
WHY WE PARTNER
JOIN Case Study
3
4
Two numbers offer insight into the urgency of JOIN’s mission.
550,000A majority of Philadelphia’s working age-adults -
a...
In the 21st century American economy, skills are essential.
▪ Tech expertise: Workers must be able to operate industry-spe...
Philadelphia residents lack the skills needed for today’s economy, and thus a
majority are either out of work or earning p...
Our current public and private systems are not adequately resourced or
structured to address Philadelphia’s tragically unt...
WHO PARTNERS IN JOIN?
Multiple Stakeholders Working Together
8
First and foremost, JOIN is a public-private partnership
of regional & national funders
Western Association of Ladies
for ...
Each Investor Brings Unique Expertise to the Table
o United Way of Greater Philadelphia & Southern New Jersey is JOIN’s le...
JOIN creates a collaborative space for developing and testing models to build an
industry-led, integrated, and career-orie...
Collective Impact
12
Source: “Embracing Emergence: How Collective Impact Addresses Complexity”, Stanford Social Innovation...
JOIN’s Collective Impact Approach
• Create a Common Agenda to Mobilize Key Stakeholders
– Public and private investors
– I...
JOIN’s Collective Impact Approach
• Collaborating across sectors through mutually reinforcing
activities
– Public
– Privat...
HOW WE PARTNER
Investments, Evaluation and Systems Change
15
Through effective and innovative approaches, JOIN increases the number of
Greater Philadelphia adults who earn family-sust...
JOIN currently invests in 3 workforce models.
Sector-based
workforce
partnerships
Young adult &
adult apprentice-
ships
Pr...
Each model embodies the features needed in the workforce system.
Industry-led
• Multiple employers in a
common industry co...
Benefits of Partnership
Effective Partnerships:
• Leverage public & private resources
• Encourage the dissemination of bes...
Why JOIN invests: WPSI’s innovative model features provide opportunities to test features that
are critically needed in th...
The bigger picture – systems change
Resources:
Public and Private
Institutions Private Sector Public Policy
Objective Incr...
Translating Outcomes to Impact
• Evaluation activities must be compelling
– Can’t rely on the information/data to be compe...
Next Steps for JOIN
Our current “hot spots”
• Engagement – Sustaining partner engagement
over the long term and keeping th...
Discussion Questions - Partners
1. What stakeholders do you need around your
table to move your work forward?
– Your theor...
Discussion Questions – Tools
1. What are your tools and levers?
– Investments & grants, evaluation, technical
assistance, ...
Discussion Questions – Thought Leadership
How are you communicating, regularly and
intentionally with your key audiences?
...
Discussion Questions – Catalytic Change
How do you move from promising practice to systems
change?
• What are you working ...
For More Information
To Learn More
Visit JOIN’s website www.joincollaborative.org
Follow us! @joincollab & @joinjennie
Rea...
Appendix: JOIN’s Theory of Change
29
Opportunities
• National, regional, local
spotlight on jobs
• National focus on (and ...
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Funders Partnering to Drive Innovation in Job Training and Mobility, Jennie Sparandara

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Funders Partnering to Drive Innovation in Job Training and Mobility, Jennie Sparandara

  1. 1. Funders Partnering to Drive Innovation in Job Training & Mobility: Job Opportunity Investment Network (JOIN) Social Innovation Exchange Conference Philadelphia, PA June 25, 2013 1
  2. 2. Today’s Game Plan 1. Introductions 10-15 min • Name, Organization, Location • What are you most excited about learning at this conference? • Do you have a goal for this session? What is it? 2. Case Study for Engagement & Collaboration 20 min • JOIN as a model of mobilization and collaboration 3. Group Discussion and Experiences 35 min 4. Wrap Up 10 min 2
  3. 3. WHY WE PARTNER JOIN Case Study 3
  4. 4. 4 Two numbers offer insight into the urgency of JOIN’s mission. 550,000A majority of Philadelphia’s working age-adults - about 550,000 people - are functionally low literate, and thus lack the basic skills needed to compete in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. 211,000Only 3 in 10 Philadelphia jobs – about 211,000 – can be filled by a worker who is functionally low literate. SOURCE: Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board “Help Wanted” Report (2009) More than half of Philadelphians compete for less than one-third of the available jobs in the economy.
  5. 5. In the 21st century American economy, skills are essential. ▪ Tech expertise: Workers must be able to operate industry-specific technology in areas from nursing to green building. ▪ Ability to learn continuously: Since businesses are constantly changing their models to adapt to the economy, staff need to be constantly learning as well. ▪ Economic security: Workers need income stability in order to deal with the more frequent shocks of the modern economy. Jobs yesterday Jobs today ▪ Long-term ▪ Manual labor-based – 1 in 4 jobs in Philadelphia was in manufacturing (1979) – 27% of jobs were skilled (1950) ▪ Moderate returns to education – College grads earned 1.4x HS grads (1975) ▪ Moderate wage differentiation – 28:1 CEO:worker pay ratio* (1970) ▪ Short-term ▪ Knowledge-based – 1 in 20 jobs in Philadelphia is in manufacturing (2009) – 70% of jobs are skilled (2009) ▪ High returns to education – College grads earn 2x HS grads (2007) ▪ Acute wage differentiation – 369:1 CEO:worker pay ratio (2005) vs. Keys to success in the 21st century American economy: SOURCE: Business Week, Univ. of Southern California, NBER, Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board, American Community Survey, 2000 U.S. Census 5
  6. 6. Philadelphia residents lack the skills needed for today’s economy, and thus a majority are either out of work or earning poverty wages. Philadelphia has a dramatic shortage of skilled workers compared to labor market needs. Education of Philadelphia adults v. US workforce, 2007 Percent • Philadelphia ranks 92nd of the 100 largest US cities in its percentage of adults with post- secondary attainment. • Worse yet, education levels may “overstate” Philadelphia’s work readiness. Estimates indicate that as much as half of adults with only a high school diploma are functionally low-literate (6th grade or below) in math and reading. • This low level of educational attainment is in the context of a Philadelphia employment market whose focus is on “meds and eds.” This means the percent of Philadelphia jobs requiring some college is ~5-10% higher than the nation. Philadelphia ranks 96th out of the top 100 cities in labor market participation. • 45% of Philadelphians are neither working nor looking for work. • Another 40% of working Philadelphians are earning poverty wages. Philadelphia has a staggering poverty rate (25%) that is nearly twice the national average. Philadelphia’s median household income ($36,222) is more than one-third less than the U.S. average ($52,175) and well below self-sufficiency standards.* * Family Sustaining Wage for 1 adult, 1 preschooler is ~$41,863 or approximately $20 per hour/ SOURCE: Business Week, Univ. of Southern California, NBER, Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board, American Community Survey, 2005-2009 21% 10% 11% 36% 36% 30% 19% 20% 17% 5% 8% 10% 12% 17% 21% 8% 9% 11% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Philadelphia adult pop. PA adult pop. Employed U.S. workforce Advanced Bachelor's Associate's Some College HS diploma Less than HS 6
  7. 7. Our current public and private systems are not adequately resourced or structured to address Philadelphia’s tragically untapped human capital. SOURCE: Mt. Auburn Associates report to Surdna Foundation board The public system is not adequately resourced or structured… … and the private sector is not investing in lower-skilled adults. The public system should work with employers to improve the region’s human capital. To realize this goal, the public system needs to be: • Industry-led to ensure that individuals are trained for high-demand jobs, as well as to incentivize employer investment. • Integrated to enable individuals to receive coordinated supportive services, literacy education, technical skills, and case management. • Aligned with the region’s education, economic development, and social service strategies. • Career-oriented to ensure adults have the skills needed to compete in an increasingly competitive global economy. 4.9 13.2 19.3 22.9 0 10 20 30 No HS diploma HS grad Some college Bachelor's degree Percentage of workers that receive formal training from their employers. • U.S. employers spend over $125 billion annually on employee learning and development. But this training goes overwhelmingly to highly skilled workers. • The system focuses on short-term training and job placement, not on comprehensive education and training. The system is not given nearly enough resources to put lower-skilled adults on the path to career readiness. • The system provides temporary interventions rather than integrated solutions. Adult education, technical training, and supportive services all come from separate funding sources and are often delivered independently of one another. • The system is not fully connected to businesses and regional economic development efforts, and so it can sometimes prepare individuals for jobs that no longer exist. 7
  8. 8. WHO PARTNERS IN JOIN? Multiple Stakeholders Working Together 8
  9. 9. First and foremost, JOIN is a public-private partnership of regional & national funders Western Association of Ladies for Relief and Employment of the Poor 9
  10. 10. Each Investor Brings Unique Expertise to the Table o United Way of Greater Philadelphia & Southern New Jersey is JOIN’s lead agency. It brings a focus on financial independence for families, a bond with regional employers, and a network of community partners. o The Knight Foundation, LISC, the Scattergood Foundation, and the William Penn Foundation bring experience investing in healthy, thriving communities and an understanding of how workforce development efforts connect to other key community issues. o The Philadelphia WIB and the State Department of Labor and Industry bring workforce expertise, a commitment to systems change and innovation, and a willingness to co-invest. o Bank of America, Sunoco, Boeing and other corporate funders bring industry expertise , private sector credibility and employer voices . o The National Fund for Workforce Solutions brings knowledge and expertise from a network of 32 peer collaboratives across the country that are experimenting with new workforce models. 10
  11. 11. JOIN creates a collaborative space for developing and testing models to build an industry-led, integrated, and career-oriented workforce system. JOIN Funding Collaborative (at United Way) Evaluation of models Philanthropic investors Public investors Investment in new models Advocacy for best practices Employer advisors Branch Associates 100+ businesses 20+ CBOs 10+ job training orgs. 4 public agencies 2 community colleges 200+ businesses 40+ CBOs 10+ job training orgs. 4 public agencies 2 community colleges Policy Insights & IMPAQ Investor in JOIN’s efforts Ideageneration,partnership building,modeltesting. Ideageneration,collaborative visioning,regionalstrategicplanning. Implementation partner Advisor on JOIN’s strategy Think tank advisors Legend Key Characteristics • Interactive. Every partner is both a “change agent” and a “changed agent.” Partners are expected to contribute and test ideas while embracing new practices. • Nimble. JOIN’s small center guides model development and evaluation, while distributing implementation across existing infrastructure. • Industry-led. JOIN’s work is guided by employers, both as advisors and partners. • Flexible. JOIN’s openness to new models enables local innovation. 11
  12. 12. Collective Impact 12 Source: “Embracing Emergence: How Collective Impact Addresses Complexity”, Stanford Social Innovation Review, January 21, 2013, John Kania and Mark Kramer
  13. 13. JOIN’s Collective Impact Approach • Create a Common Agenda to Mobilize Key Stakeholders – Public and private investors – Industry and employer partners – who collaborate both as funders and clients in workforce partnerships – Community based organizations, including labor organizations – Educational institution  JOIN is flexible, partners change and evolve 13 Key ?: What stakeholders do you need around your tables to move your work forward? How do you keep stakeholders engaged over time?
  14. 14. JOIN’s Collective Impact Approach • Collaborating across sectors through mutually reinforcing activities – Public – Private – Non profit – Government – Philanthropic  JOIN is entrepreneurial, opportunities help to guide partnership 14 Key ?: Who are your surrogates? Who else is carrying the banner for your work?
  15. 15. HOW WE PARTNER Investments, Evaluation and Systems Change 15
  16. 16. Through effective and innovative approaches, JOIN increases the number of Greater Philadelphia adults who earn family-sustaining wages. 16 Investment: JOIN invests in innovative models that have the potential to improve outcomes for both businesses and low-skilled workers. Evaluation: JOIN evaluates the impact of its partnerships, identifying best practices and illuminating opportunities for improvement. Policy & Communication: JOIN advocates for the incorporation of best practices into public policy, the public workforce system, and stakeholder practices. Increase the number of Greater Philadelphians who earn family- sustaining wages JOIN achieves its mission through a three-pronged approach:
  17. 17. JOIN currently invests in 3 workforce models. Sector-based workforce partnerships Young adult & adult apprentice- ships Prison-based career training and coaching MODEL TYPE DESCRIPTION • The sector-based partnership model works by forming a bridge between employers and workers. First, these partnerships bring together numerous employers in the same industry to identify talent gaps. Then, the partnerships connect these employers to job training providers and social service agencies that prepare low- skilled adults to fill these positions. • This “earn and learn” model moves young adults and adults into career and educational pathways. Participants are paid a full-time salary and go to school part- time. At the end of the program, participants have a marketable, portable credential to apply for permanent employment within one of Philadelphia’s strongest industry sectors. JOIN’s models are not mutually exclusive, and they have a number of overlapping features. • This model provides current prison inmates with intensive job training in landscaping and horticulture, as well as life skills support and work exposure. Upon release from prison, program graduates obtain landscaping jobs. 17
  18. 18. Each model embodies the features needed in the workforce system. Industry-led • Multiple employers in a common industry come together around shared talent needs. • Employers determine what training is provided on flexible schedule. Sector-based workforce partnerships Young adult and adult apprentice- ships Prison-based career training and coaching Aligned • Partnerships are in areas that are key to Philadelphia’s economic development strategies: healthcare and advanced manufacturing. Career-oriented and integrated • Services include career coaching, contextualized literacy, and vocational training. • Services are delivered in integrated fashion. MODEL TYPE • Multiple employers in a common location (West Philadelphia) come together around a commitment to hire from the community. • Partnership is tied to broader community development strategy in West Philadelphia. • Services include workplace mentorship, vocational training, work exposure, and degree attainment support. • Services are delivered in integrated fashion. • A single, large employer plays a leadership role in providing transitional jobs and a pathway to broader employer opportunities. A small number of smaller employers play supporting roles. • Partnership is tied to broader City-led initiatives and services to move ex-offenders into employment. • Services include vocational and life skills training, legal support, case management, and wrap- around services. • Services are delivered in integrated fashion. FEATURES 18
  19. 19. Benefits of Partnership Effective Partnerships: • Leverage public & private resources • Encourage the dissemination of best organizational practices • Establish relationships that accelerate industry-wide product and process innovation Strategic Partnerships facilitate: • Strategic, business expansion, and succession planning assistance for small businesses • Connection to the resources of the workforce system • Training subsidies through group discounts and public incentives • Development of customized training and educational curricula • Development of and training to support industry-recognized credentials 19
  20. 20. Why JOIN invests: WPSI’s innovative model features provide opportunities to test features that are critically needed in the workforce development system. Here are three examples: Highlighted Investment: West Philadelphia Skills Initiative Challenge: The public workforce system is disconnected from business and economic development efforts. Challenge: The public system focuses on short term training and placement for jobs of variable quality. Challenge: Labor market information is not the same as labor market intelligence – both are needed to determine whether opportunity and need align. Solution: WPSI leverages UCD’s existing employer relationships to implement an employer-driven approach to workforce development and addresses the national need for a model that engages anchor institutions in workforce development. WPSI leverages tuition assistance benefits provided by employers to create a pathway for non-college- bound young adults to pursue college credits while they build their careers in positions of high need in area institutions. Solution: WPSI developed a series of job and systems maps to define career pathways into entry level positions with opportunities for advancement. • WPSI defined exactly what they intended to map, then developed a detailed definition of the parameters of an “entry level” position to be used by all institutional partners to determine job opportunities. • Next, WPSI developed and piloted an instrument to survey turnover and hiring data across entry level positions to determine whether there were real human capital needs. Solution: WPSI’s apprenticeship model combines contextualized career readiness with coaching, specific skill training and on the job learning for positions with advancement potential. • Participants are paid a full-time salary and go to school part-time. At the end of the program, participants have a marketable, portable credential to apply for permanent employment within one of Philadelphia’s strongest industry sectors. • “Earn and learn” forms bridges between work and education. • Early investor: Providing critical flexible start up resources • Model tester: Connecting program to rigorous third party evaluation • Amplifier: Working to incorporate best practices into public policy 20
  21. 21. The bigger picture – systems change Resources: Public and Private Institutions Private Sector Public Policy Objective Increased public and private resources support demand- driven workforce partnerships that increase opportunity for low-skilled workers. Educational and training curricula aligns with employer- demanded skills and industry-valued credentials. Employers improve and increase career advancement practices for low-wage workers. Workforce and educational policy changes improve opportunities for low- wage workers. Local Examples Philadelphia’s public workforce system, Philadelphia Works, supports industry partnerships with local funding and coordinating activities. The School District of Philadelphia’s career and technical educational curricula is driven by industry needs and sound labor market information. Local manufacturers partner with adult education providers to offer ESL classes on- site. Local healthcare institutions provide “up front” tuition to low- wage workers. Pennsylvania’s Department of Labor and Industry codifies the successful industry partnership program into law. JOIN’s Role Lead local reform efforts on behalf of Philadelphia Works to integrate industry-partnerships into local public system. Closely connect JOIN- funded partnerships with District-convened industry advisory groups to ensure talent pipelines do not leak. Clarification of job requirements for manufacturing employees, removing unnecessary barriers to advancement. Coalition building and organizing to successfully advocate for passage of SB 552. 21 Investments in innovative and effective workforce partnerships are a key element of JOIN’s strategy. However, the greatest value in those investments rests in JOIN’s ability to translate the lessons learned through them into a systems change agenda, catalyzing improvements to public policy, institutional practices and employer behavior.
  22. 22. Translating Outcomes to Impact • Evaluation activities must be compelling – Can’t rely on the information/data to be compelling solely • ROI 360 provided a new lens from which to understand the impact of JOIN’s workforce partnerships • Moving from white papers to case studies – we’ll track the impact on readership and action • Communicating what we learn is key to JOIN’s success and advancing our agenda 22 Key ?: Who does evaluation well? What can we learn from their example? What is our thought leadership agenda?
  23. 23. Next Steps for JOIN Our current “hot spots” • Engagement – Sustaining partner engagement over the long term and keeping the collaboration fresh • Systems Change – Developing clear agenda and setting periodic milestones • Thought Leadership – Developing intentional targets for our learning and connecting with them most effectively 23
  24. 24. Discussion Questions - Partners 1. What stakeholders do you need around your table to move your work forward? – Your theory of change and strategic plan 2. How do you keep partners engaged over time? – How can you be flexible and focused at the same time? 3. Who are your collaborators and surrogates? – Who else is carrying the banner for your work? 24
  25. 25. Discussion Questions – Tools 1. What are your tools and levers? – Investments & grants, evaluation, technical assistance, employment, initiatives & programs? 2. How can you use evaluation as a tool and lever? – (How) are you currently using evaluation? – Who does evaluation well? What can we learn from their example? – Who is interested in what you are learning? • Who should be interested in what you are learning? 25
  26. 26. Discussion Questions – Thought Leadership How are you communicating, regularly and intentionally with your key audiences? 26
  27. 27. Discussion Questions – Catalytic Change How do you move from promising practice to systems change? • What are you working to change? – Public policies and/or funding? – Institutional practices • Educational systems, workforce investment systems, economic development practices – Employer practices – Practitioner behavior • How can you set realistic goals and milestones? 27
  28. 28. For More Information To Learn More Visit JOIN’s website www.joincollaborative.org Follow us! @joincollab & @joinjennie Read the ROI study Download for free at joincollaborative.org Contact: Jennie Sparandara Director, JOIN jennie@joincollaborative.org 215.665.2434 28
  29. 29. Appendix: JOIN’s Theory of Change 29 Opportunities • National, regional, local spotlight on jobs • National focus on (and local infrastructure of) industry and sectoral partnerships • Mayor launches Philadelphia Works • Waves of development and economic expansion (Navy Yard, Convention Center, transportation) Challenges • 40% of Philadelphia workers earn poverty wages and 1/3 of Philadelphians lack basic skills • Region’s largest foundations are non committal to issue • Great Recession and uncertainty around recovery (and labor demand) Outcomes We will increase: • Participation by charitable foundations in supporting the advancement of low- skilled workers • Basic and occupational skills in targeted industries through innovative workforce partnerships • Awareness and action within the greater Phila. civic and business communities of the crisis of marginally attached workers and the power of the sectoral approach Strategies • Draw a finer picture of the region’s population, enhancing our understanding of low-skilled labor supply • Scan the economic development and employer landscape to anticipate demand for entry level workers • Provide thought leadership on innovative solutions to regional skills gap • Develop the primary vehicle for engaging foundations in the regional workforce system • Act as a laboratory for sector based approach to skills training Impact Increased economic prosperity for low income adults in Greater Philadelphia while addressing critical talent shortages in key industries

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