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global poverty scenario

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global poverty scenario

  1. 1. Global poverty scenario, inter-state disparities Made by group of 7: Rishabh singh Neeraj Tanmay Faizal Anurag Anand Nemesh, is not working in our group
  2. 2. The proportion of people in developing countries living in extreme economic poverty — defined by the World Bank as living on less than $1 per day—has fallen from 28 per cent in 1990 to 21 per cent in 2001. Although there has been a substantial reduction in global poverty, it is marked with great regional differences. Poverty declined substantially in China and Southeast Asian countries as a result of rapid economic growth and massive investments in human resource development. Number of poor's in China has come down from 606 million in 1981 to 212 million in 2001. In the countries of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan) the decline has not been as rapid. Despite decline in the percentage of the poor, the number of poor has declined marginally from 475 million in 1981 to 428 million in 2001. Because of different poverty line definition, poverty in India is also
  3. 3. 6 Billion People in the World: Haves and Have-Not’s what they need hope of getting what they need. all. very little at
  4. 4. Poverty in India also has another aspect or dimension. Recent estimates show that in 20 states and union territories, the poverty ratio is less than the national average. On the other hand, poverty is still a serious problem in Orissa, Bihar, Assam, Tripura and Uttar Pradesh. Orissa and Bihar continue to be the two poorest states with poverty ratios of 47 and 43 per cent respectively. Along with rural poverty urban poverty is also high in Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, Bihar and Uttar Pradesh. In comparison , there has been a significant decline in poverty in Kerala, Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh, TamilNadu, Gujarat and West Bengal. States like Punjab and Haryana have traditionally succeeded in reducing poverty with the help of high agricultural growth rates. Kerala has focused more on human resource development. In West Bengal, land reform measures have helped in reducing poverty. In Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu public distribution of food grains could have been responsible for the improvement
  5. 5. Number of poor (in million) Year Number (million) 1973-74 321 1983 323 1993-94 320 2004-05 302
  6. 6. What is poverty? • It is the state or condition of having little or no money, goods, or means of support; condition of being poor. • • The examples of poverty are : A person whom has not enough money to pay a person’s bills. • It is the state or condition of having little or no money, goods, or means of support; condition of being poor • The examples of poverty are : A person whom has not enough money to pay a person’s bills.
  7. 7. The three ways to reduce poverty • These are the three ways to reduce poverty: 1. Increase the wages of low skill labor or government redistribution policies. • The advice to get more education to avoid being poor works for individuals, but since for many jobs having a college education does not increase your productivity it cannot be a solution for everybody. There is also the problem of people who are poor due to mental or physical illness which can only be solved with subsidies
  8. 8. The three ways to reduce poverty • These are the three ways to reduce poverty: 1. Increase the wages of low skill labor or government redistribution policies. • The advice to get more education to avoid being poor works for individuals, but since for many jobs having a college education does not increase your productivity it cannot be a solution for everybody. There is also the problem of people who are poor due to mental or physical illness which can only be solved with subsidies
  9. 9. What is “FREE THE CHILDREN” all about? (Pictures) • Here are just some pictures from “FREE THE CHILDREN” organization .
  10. 10. The result? • The organization updated its website to show that it has now built 650 schools and school rooms which educate 55,000 children a day. • In addition to the following , Free the Children has also teamed up with Me to We, their partner organization, to offer international volunteer trips for youth. • They return with new perspectives and more energy than ever before to be involved in raising awareness and funds for overseas development projects through Free The Children.
  11. 11. Movement in Indices of Commodity Prices India vs International:Wheat Movement in Indices of Commodity Prices India vs International:Cereals 300 300 269.9 257.9 250 250 227.3 231.1 237.4 208.4 200 200 167.4 158.7 150 150 121.3 100 120.4 118.6 114.1 125.8 122.6 120.7 124.6 125 128.8 113 100 106.7 100 100 100 100 50 50 2005 2006 2007 Year 2008 Qtr I 2008 Qtr II 2005 2008 Qtr III 2006 2007 India WPI India WPI Movement in Indices of Commodity Prices India vs International:Rice 350 331.1 300 261.5 250 179.2 150 113.5 115.5 100 105.5 102.1 115.8 117 108.4 100 100 50 2005 2006 India WPI 2007 Year 2008 Qtr I 2008 Qtr II International (IMF Indices) 2008 Qtr I 2008 Qtr II International (IMF Indices) International (IMF Indices) 200 Year 2008 Qtr III 2008 Qtr III
  12. 12. Regional Disparities • Significant Regional Disparities in India. • Per capita income : Highest per capita income Rs.16,679 in Punjab; lowest per capita income state Rs.3557 in Bihar • Female infant mortality varies from 12 in Kerala to 88 in Madhya Pradesh • Female literacy varies from 33.6% in Bihar to 88% in Kerala. • Inter-state disparities in the growth of Gross State Domestic Product (GSDP) increased in the post-reform period compared to the eighties. • In general, richer states grew faster than the poorer states. • Causes for disparities; • Investment in physical and human capital • Technology • Institutions including governance
  13. 13. Which are the countries that “FREE THE CHILDREN” organization is involved? • These are the countries that are involved in are: Sierra Leone, Kenya, China and Sri Lanka.
  14. 14. “We Day” conference • We Day is an annual "youth empowerment" event. • Held in cities across Canada, We Day motivates youth to take action on local and global issues. • This annual event starts of as a year-long initiative encouraging students to participate in Free The Children’s campaigns, which raise awareness for local and international projects.
  15. 15. Problems in Employment • There are 458 million workers in India in 2004-05 • Out of this 423 million workers are informal/unorganised workers (92%). • Growth in employment more in unorganised sector. • Thus, quality of employment is a problem • Workers in this sector do not have social security. • Government is trying to provide minimum social security to unorganized workers
  16. 16. Poverty Targets 2015 poverty targets Members of the Organisation for Co-operation and Development (OECD) agreed these after the 1995 Copenhagen summit. They aim to reduce poverty in third world countries by at least one half by 2015. 20/20 initiative At the same summit some governments agreed that 20% of aid and 20% of the budget of the developing country receiving that aid would be spent on basic services.
  17. 17. Health Care in India • India has 48 doctors per 100,000 persons which is fewer than in developed nations • Wide urban-rural gap in the availability of medical services: Inequity • Poor facilities even in large Government institutions compared to corporate hospitals (Lack of funds, poor management, political and bureaucratic interference, lack of leadership in medical community)
  18. 18. Percentage budget share of cereals Year Rural Rural Urban Urban Top 30% Bottom 30% 29.5 38.9 Top 30% 1970-71 Bottom 30% 53.7 1990-91 39.4 18.2 27.6 9.5 1993-94 35.7 15.7 25.6 8.2 2004-05 29.3 12.5 20.6 6.3 13.4
  19. 19. Economic development, Education and Health •Economic deprivation in a large segment of population results in poor access to health care. •Poor educational status leads to non-utilization of scanty health services and increase in avoidable risk factors. •Both are closely related to life expectancy and IMR. •Advances in medicine are responsible for no more than half of the observed improvement in health indices.
  20. 20. Health Care in Developing Countries • Existing infrastructure for health care needs to be strengthened. Health should be perceived as an investment and receive greater budgetary allocation • Education, safe water and sanitation need priority • Vaccination coverage to be improved • Better implementation of national health programs • Judicious use of the scant resources by promoting most cost-effective strategies for disease prevention • Inclusion of all level of stakeholders in planning and policy making using tremendous human resource available in the country

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