Presented by Director of Office of Energy Management
Ron Kelley
Campus Master Planning
• Why Utilities Planning is
important
• Utility Planning Considerations
• 2000 Master Plan Successe...
Why is Utilities Infrastructure Important?
• Actions #71 and #73 of Educating Illinois; and Goal 3,
Strategy 5 of Ed. Il. ...
Utility Considerations
• Electrical Power:
– Nearest power station? (Ameren IP)
– High (12.5 KV) vs Low (4.16 KV) voltage ...
Utility Considerations
• Air Conditioning:
– Proximity to a Chilled Water Plant?
– Building demand? Is there existing capa...
2000 Master Plan
What have we accomplished?
• Energy Conservation
– Lighting Upgrades
– Boiler operations
– Insulation & S...
District Cooling Plan
Starting Point 2000
New/Good
Marginal
High Risk
Failed
Loop
District Cooling Plan
BSC and Quad Loops
Quad Loop:
SCH
HOV
WMS*
CPA
CVA
COB
McC
DEG
COOK
EDW
FC/MET
SSB
BSC: BSC, Braden,...
District Cooling Plan
NE Loop
NE Loop:
SLB
MLT
JUL
FH/FHA
E. Campus
*Replaced CRP
District Cooling Plan
NW & SE Loops
SE Loop:
WAT
STV
WC
NW Loop:
RBA *
HTN*
W. Campus
Linkins
NS
TUR
District Cooling Plan
South Loop
South Loop:
SF&KR
FEL
COB
CFA*
District Cooling Plan
Current Loops
What does good Energy
Management planning Save?
2001 2009 Reduction Rate FY09
Savings
Electricity
(kWhrs)
93,561,596 87,18...
Energy Services Contract (ESCO)
Why at ISU?
• To do in a single year what has taken us 8!
• Reduce Energy Consumption, Uti...
Impacts of Failure to Plan for Utilities
• Feasibility of the Master Plan
• Risk of lack of expansion capabilities
• Lack ...
Utility Strategies for This MP?
• District Heating and Cooling Interconnectivity
• Gregory Street Infrastructure
• Reliabi...
Energy management presentation
Energy management presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Energy management presentation

223 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
223
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Examples of #2: you cannot plan a major remodel project without considering Utilities Infrastructure. In fact our experiences with SCH, STV/TUR, Res. Halls and CDS projects all involved significant mechanical issues. #3: The same applies to new construction COB tunnel for steam and CW, placement of SF&KR impacted the capacity of the Quad chiller and required the S. Plant project to be initiated. Gregory St. will require all new sources of power, heating, and cooling. CFA is a case where all utilities are in place and only minimal utility infrastructure improvements will be necessary.
  • These are some of the Utility Infrastructure issues Master Planners will need to consider in both the case of new construction and facility upgrades.
  • This plan has been the Bible for virtually every utility decision made in the past 8 years. As you can see by the condition, it has been either on my desk or in my notebook the entire time. The good news is as you go down the Table of Contents you can see we have completed or made substantial progress in all of the areas. Lighting Upgrades: thanks to almost $900,000 in grants from Il Clean Energy Foundation we have been able to perform T12/Elec ballast upgrades in every building on campus. Every year since 2002 energy savings from the utility budget have been reinvested in not only lighting, but also boiler upgrades, insulation, and steam trap replacement. These are the “low hanging” fruit of the energy conservation projects. District cooling and the installation of 4 boiler economizers have been the primary infrastructure improvements since 2002. In the area of Procurement, the most significant event was the deregulation of the electrical market in 2007. ISU took the leadership role and joined with 4 other state univ (EIU, SIU/SIUE, WIU) to combine our loads and profiles and a joint RFP process to guarantee us favorable rates. Let me walk you through the District cooling progress we have made since 2002.
  • This is the status of chiller water units in 2001. As you can see most every building had its own chiller unit, and most of these were in marginal or high risk condition. There were no redundant systems, if a chiller broke, the facility went without AC until a repair or replacement was made. The yellow sites mark the beginning of District cooling on our campus. A large chiller was purchased with the construction of CPA and was installed in the HP. Subsequently, the chillers in Cook, Edw, and FC, MET failed and those facilities became the first buildings on the Quad district loop.
  • Funds from both the COB and SCH projects were used to purchase the second Chiller & Tower and were also installed in the HP. You can see the list of buildings that have been added to the Quad loop as a result of this plan. Left to be added are CE/CW, OU, the remainder of Wms, and FEL. BSC was build with two large redundant chillers. So rather than replace the chiller in Milner, BSC was made into a “notional chiller plant” and now serves BSC, Braden, Milner, and Bowling-Billiards center. Does anyone know where our second “Notional Chiller Plant” is Located?
  • E. Campus chiller failed. UHS had $1.5M project planned. But…SLB was built with 2 chillers with double capacity so SLB became the NE chiller plant. Soon after, the remainder of the 5 chillers in the CRP failed or were expensive to maintain, so the CRP was scrapped and all of those buildings were added to the NE Loop.
  • These two chiller plants were constructed simultaneously and opened during the summer of 2008. Next season Linkins DC will be added to the SE Loop and Turner Hall will be added to the NW loop this summer with N/S to follow when its current chiller starts to show signs of old age. With two season under their belts, both of these plants are operating with far less that their anticipated loads which is indicative of even greater efficiencies that used in the design.
  • The last of the planned chiller loops is the South plant currently under construction to primarily support the SF&KR facility. In addition it will take some of the load off of the Quad chiller system by also cooling COB and FEL immediately, and eventually will extend to Coll of Fine Arts.
  • Now that these loops are nearly complete, the next goal will be to start incorporating some inter-connectivity between the loops. SW-SLB-SE-South could all be linked. This will significantly increase reliability, redundancy, and will give us the opportunity to exercise some fuel flexibility between the gas chillers in the Quad loop and the electric chillers in the satellite plants.
  • Might want to mention the Utility issue at U of I as an example of failure to Master Plan.
  • Energy management presentation

    1. 1. Presented by Director of Office of Energy Management Ron Kelley
    2. 2. Campus Master Planning • Why Utilities Planning is important • Utility Planning Considerations • 2000 Master Plan Successes – Infrastructure – Energy Management • Our ESCO Project • Failure to Plan Utilities • Strategies for this Master Plan
    3. 3. Why is Utilities Infrastructure Important? • Actions #71 and #73 of Educating Illinois; and Goal 3, Strategy 5 of Ed. Il. 2008-14: “Complete capital improvement projects that address health and safety issues as well as adequate and efficient utility support.” • Age and condition of Utilities and Mechanical Systems Impact Cost and Scope of MP Facility Improvement projects. • Availability, Location, and Capacity of Utilities impact cost and feasibility of MP new construction sites. • Utility Planning must take place from the START.
    4. 4. Utility Considerations • Electrical Power: – Nearest power station? (Ameren IP) – High (12.5 KV) vs Low (4.16 KV) voltage ? – Emergency or Backup generation? – Potential for Alt. or Renewable Power? • Heat: – Steam or Hot water? – Proximity to Heating plant and tunnel system? – Capacity/Redundancy of the existing plant(s)? – Size for future growth/expansion (Piping). – Independent systems vs District Heating? (impact on footprint, Mech. Rm. space)
    5. 5. Utility Considerations • Air Conditioning: – Proximity to a Chilled Water Plant? – Building demand? Is there existing capacity? Distribution? – Cooling Season? – Size for future growth/expansion? – Independent system? DX Units? (impact on footprint, Mech. Rm. space) • Water: – Access to Town of Normal Water system? – Storm water run off? – Risk of flooding or leaking? • Mechanical Systems: (Chillers, Cooling Towers, Boilers, Air Handlers) – Type, Size, Capacity? – Fuel Source? (Elec vs Gas) – Access for Maintenance and Replacement? – Location (Basement vs Rooftop?) – Exterior Presence? – Budget? – Sustainability issues?
    6. 6. 2000 Master Plan What have we accomplished? • Energy Conservation – Lighting Upgrades – Boiler operations – Insulation & Steam traps • Infrastructure Improvement – District Cooling – Boiler Economizers • Energy Procurement – 5 School Electric contract – Natural Gas strategy
    7. 7. District Cooling Plan Starting Point 2000 New/Good Marginal High Risk Failed Loop
    8. 8. District Cooling Plan BSC and Quad Loops Quad Loop: SCH HOV WMS* CPA CVA COB McC DEG COOK EDW FC/MET SSB BSC: BSC, Braden, BBC, Milner Not: CE/CW OU Wms* FEL
    9. 9. District Cooling Plan NE Loop NE Loop: SLB MLT JUL FH/FHA E. Campus *Replaced CRP
    10. 10. District Cooling Plan NW & SE Loops SE Loop: WAT STV WC NW Loop: RBA * HTN* W. Campus Linkins NS TUR
    11. 11. District Cooling Plan South Loop South Loop: SF&KR FEL COB CFA*
    12. 12. District Cooling Plan Current Loops
    13. 13. What does good Energy Management planning Save? 2001 2009 Reduction Rate FY09 Savings Electricity (kWhrs) 93,561,596 87,187,011 6,374,585 $ .0792 $504,867 Nat. Gas (Therms) 6,746,593 6,114,791 631,802 $ .99 $625,483 Water (Gal *1000) 236,414.7 182,961.7 53,453.0 $7.05 $376,844 $1,507,194 Note: This is enough savings to pay for (fill in the blank) !! > $10 million in 8 years !!
    14. 14. Energy Services Contract (ESCO) Why at ISU? • To do in a single year what has taken us 8! • Reduce Energy Consumption, Utility Costs, Compound effect of Savings • Facility infrastructure improvement and systems reliability • Accelerate the construction period • Engineer the highest priority projects with greatest payback • Legislative benefits (110 ILCS 62, Public University Energy Cons. Act) • Streamlined Procurement • Guaranteed source of funding • Single POC for all project functions • Comprehensive engineering and design approach • Our Project • NORESCO • Schedule • Facilities (SLB, Milner, HP)
    15. 15. Impacts of Failure to Plan for Utilities • Feasibility of the Master Plan • Risk of lack of expansion capabilities • Lack of flexibility to accommodate Economic, Natural disaster, other events. • “Piecemeal” Utilities are expensive, inefficient, and will need re-design at every phase of the Master Plan construction.
    16. 16. Utility Strategies for This MP? • District Heating and Cooling Interconnectivity • Gregory Street Infrastructure • Reliability/Efficiency/Conservation (ESCO) • Metering • Reduce Deferred Maintenance • Energy Procurement • Renewable/Alternative Energy

    ×