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© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Functioning of the
Centres of Government
i...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Key characteristics of the analysis
• Based on da...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Institutionalisation of the critical CoG function...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Institutional set-up
There are two distinct appro...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Quality assurance for government decisions
• Rule...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Planning and prioritisation
• Most of the WB gove...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Sectoral planning
• Most of the WB governments ha...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Implementation of government plans
• Implementati...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Monitoring the work of the government
• Key funct...
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Go to: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/2bad1e9c-en
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Presentation - “Functioning of the Centres of Government in the Western Balkans - Some key lessons learned from the SIGMA comparative analysis”, Mr. Peter Vagi

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Presentation - “Functioning of the Centres of Government in the Western Balkans - Some key lessons learned from the SIGMA comparative analysis”, Peter Vagi, Senior Adviser, OECD, SIGMA - Regional conference on the functioning of centres of government in the Western Balkans, 22-23 June 2017, Danilovgrad, Montenegro.

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Presentation - “Functioning of the Centres of Government in the Western Balkans - Some key lessons learned from the SIGMA comparative analysis”, Mr. Peter Vagi

  1. 1. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Functioning of the Centres of Government in the Western Balkans Some key lessons learned from the SIGMA comparative analysis Peter Vági Senior Adviser, SIGMA Danilovgrad, 22 June 2017 Montenegro
  2. 2. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Key characteristics of the analysis • Based on data from the 2015 Baseline Measurement and additional information from 2016 • Covers only the Western Balkans (WB) • Uses typology to identify common themes, similarities and key challenges • Uses EU member country examples for illustration 1 Interviews or focus groups Analysis of administrative data Survey methodology Analysis of statistical data • Focuses on the analysis of the setup and performance of WB Centre of Governments (CoGs) against the SIGMA Principles related to: • The critical functions of the CoG • Medium-term planning • Monitoring and reporting • Preparation and quality assurance of government decisions
  3. 3. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Institutionalisation of the critical CoG functions • The legal framework for establishing the critical functions is in place and the routines ensuring the basic functioning of the system are well established in the Western Balkans 2 • Preparation of government sessions, ensuring legal conformity and co-ordinating EI are formally established and fully functional in all the Western Balkan governments • General shortcomings identified for the co-ordination of policy content, where it is not fully functional in any of the WB governments • Planning (and monitoring) is organised in the most varied way in the WB, including also additional organisational structures, such as Delivery Units and alike
  4. 4. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Institutional set-up There are two distinct approaches to institutional set-up:  Most functions in one (stronger) institution – Albania, Kosovo*  More limited mandate of one central institution – Montenegro, Serbia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia + BiH State-level Secretariat of the CoM has even more limited functions 3 • Both exists also in EU member countries • Level of centralisation does not determine efficiency • Key enablers: • Co-ordination within the key CoG institution (or lack of it) • Inter-institutional co-ordination (among key CoG players) • Capacities (staffing, legal and administrative tools to ensure quality) • This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244/99 and the Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice on Kosovo’s declaration of independence.
  5. 5. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Quality assurance for government decisions • Rules of preparation for decision making  Opportunity to exchange opinions  Procedural requirements for review (deadlines for submission)  Quality requirements, including Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA) 4 • The main challenge for all the Western Balkan governments is to fully and consistently implement the set procedures • Also hindered by varying, but generally large number of items to review 344 160 2384 1100 357 889 114 2516 710 1182 235 602 138 838 719 716 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 ALB BIH XKV MKD MNE SRB 2013 2014 2015 Items submitted to the government (4th quarter) • Rights of the CoG institutions in review  Returning items on procedural basis  Returning items on content basis  Providing (non-binding) opinions
  6. 6. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Planning and prioritisation • Most of the WB governments use several central planning documents that make ensuring coherence more challenging • None of the Western Balkan economies has a clear typology or hierarchy for their central planning documents and alignment with EI plans is creating further difficulties 5 • Planning has been an experimental field for several countries • Prioritisation approach varies (either separate document in one plan or in none) and often done by others not directly involved in operational planning • Strong bottom-up tendencies in planning, with varying extents of practical co-ordination by the CoG • Where it exists, alignment between medium-term and annual plans is an additional issue • Medium-term budgeting exists, but is rarely used for sectoral policy objective setting
  7. 7. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Sectoral planning • Most of the WB governments have a framework for sectoral planning, but their maturity varies and implementation is still limited in terms of co-ordination • Sectoral plans are still mushrooming and plans for their development are over-ambitious (annually 10-20, sometimes 30 or more strategies planned) • The level of maturity of the system for costing the strategies is very low 6 Country Regulation exists Hierarchy of plans Typology of plans Detailed requirements Costing requirements Monitoring requirements ALB yes no partial yes partial (link to MTEF) partial BIH State yes yes (partial) yes yes partial (link to MTEF) yes XKV yes no no partial partial (link to MTEF) no MKD yes yes yes yes partial (link to budgeting) partial MNE no N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A SRB no N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
  8. 8. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Implementation of government plans • Implementation expressed by backlogs varies, but generally high (and substantially higher for laws and strategies than for other, less complex items) • The overall challenge is over-optimistic planning, which is partly caused by the weak co-ordination capacity and lack of authority of the CoG body in charge of planning 7 2014 laws 2015 laws No. of items in 2015 ALB Not available 19.0% 551 BIH State 14.0% 34.0% 217 XKV 48.5% 46.0% 679 MKD 16.0% 16.0% 550 MNE 26.0% 19.5% 233 SRB 49.0% 33.9% 853
  9. 9. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Monitoring the work of the government • Key functions of monitoring and reporting: regular review of how the government performs in achieving its objectives (to take corrective measures when necessary) and accountability and public scrutiny • Neither function is fully served by existing WB monitoring practices 8 • Public availability of reports is not the norm and nor is it shared with parliaments • Reports generally focus on outputs, but not assessment of progress against objectives • Reporting on sector strategies is not fully in place in any of the WB economies • Feedback from monitoring to planning is not general practice
  10. 10. AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Go to: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/2bad1e9c-en Website: www.sigmaweb.org E-mail: sigmaweb@oecd.org Thank you! To find out more about the study and SIGMA: 9

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