© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Zagreb (Croatia) 22-23 May 2014
Elke Löffl...
© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Leadership versus Management
2
Source: Bas...
© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Group Work:
What is your definition of lea...
© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Culture change for improving quality
Cultu...
© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Stories
The
‘deep
culture’
Symbols
Rituals...
© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Mapping the cultural changes required
From...
Element What was What is needed
Core culture
or paradigm
Outward rather than inward looking.
Intellectually strong but foc...
Element What was What is needed
Symbols Different treatment of staff in
London, Scotland and overseas
DfID in Whitehall wa...
Rituals &
routines
Stories
Symbols
Control system
Organisation
structure
Power structure
Top executive reality
Everyday re...
© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Case study: The new competency framework i...
© OECD
AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion,
principallyfinancedbytheEU
Group exercise:
Barriers and obstacles to ...
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Leadership in the public sector

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The Workshop on Quality Management in Public Services will make the participants aware of key elements in quality management and will enable the participants to apply these approaches in their daily functions. The workshop will also encourage team work and peer learning across the public organisations in Croatia.

Published in: Leadership & Management
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Leadership in the public sector

  1. 1. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Zagreb (Croatia) 22-23 May 2014 Elke Löffler, SIGMA Expert Leadership and Management in Different Organisational Cultures
  2. 2. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Leadership versus Management 2 Source: Based on Gabriel (1999, p. 139), in: Bovaird and Loeffler (2009), Public Management and Governance, p. 266. What leaders do What managers do Focus on the future Invent an image for the future that is so persuasive that we are willing to commit our efforts, time and resources to turn an image into reality Focus on the present situation Organise our current resources so that we can use them effectively Have a keen eye for detail Think of ways of stretching resources further Leaders shape the future. Managers deliver it.
  3. 3. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Group Work: What is your definition of leadership? 3 1. Get together in small groups and explore what a good leader means to you. 2. Do you think leadership is different from management? Discuss! 3. Feedback to the plenary.
  4. 4. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Culture change for improving quality Cultures can be strong or weak. A ‘strong’ culture is not ‘good’ unless it means ‘adaptable, flexible, imaginative, innovative’. Culture change is not convincing if its elements are not widely agreed – and if top managers themselves are not seen to live up to them. Hazel Stutely listed within the top 50 most influential NHS clinical leaders in the UK. Watch her interview http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sC3bHEz5kg
  5. 5. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Stories The ‘deep culture’ Symbols Rituals and routines Power structures Control systems Organisational structures Source: Gerry Johnson et al. (2008): Exploring corporate strategy: text and cases (8th edition). Harlow: FT Prentice Hall. The cultural web of an organisation
  6. 6. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Mapping the cultural changes required From what is To what is needed
  7. 7. Element What was What is needed Core culture or paradigm Outward rather than inward looking. Intellectually strong but focused on policy “Large group of staff for whom no change would be acceptable, whatever its rationale, so that all changes have tended to be resented and resisted” Better communication More team-working Stories Senior staff put their own name on others’ work Ability to write good policy papers more important than social and personal competencies “I don’t like to single people out for praise - don’t want others to think I’ve got favourites” Scots against the English! The new Permanent Secretary is ‘street-wise’ - used to work in DfID. He is more approachable – even in the lift! One Management Board member appointed from outside because she clearly had better people management skills than inside candidates Case Study: A cultural web for the Department for International Development in the UK
  8. 8. Element What was What is needed Symbols Different treatment of staff in London, Scotland and overseas DfID in Whitehall was “group of old white men” Improved treatment of in-country appointed staff Work/life balance example of Permanent Secretary Webcast to all staff by Permanent Secretary Objectives of all top management circulated to all staff Management Board minutes now published Open plan offices Rituals and routines Disputatious – the debate is valued more than the outcome Staff appraisal is now done very differently, to encourage more development orientation Power The Department used to feel it was a minor player in the FCO Staff now believe that DfID has significant power on world stage and could wield more if it works better with governments overseas. Within UK, power is still seen to lie within the policy making process rather than the managerial process – but to a lesser extent than before. Structure Very hierarchical, but also very strongly departmentalist There is now much more emphasis on teamworking, although the London office is still seen as more hierarchical than Scotland Control Largely through hierarchical orders to staff, with some monitoring Much more cascading down through the organisation of the targets in the PSA and SDA Source: Adapted from Tony Bovaird (2007): Triggering change through culture clash, in: Kuno Schedler & Isabella Proeller (eds.), Organisational culture and the outcomes of public management reform. London: Taylor and Francis, pp. 323-50.
  9. 9. Rituals & routines Stories Symbols Control system Organisation structure Power structure Top executive reality Everyday reality Different realities of organisational cultures
  10. 10. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Case study: The new competency framework in the London Borough of Lambeth 1. Focuses on Citizens This behaviour is about having a continual focus on the outcomes that are delivered for local citizens and other stakeholders. It goes beyond ‘wanting to do the right thing’ to genuinely engaging with and listening to citizens, understanding their needs and helping them make decisions about the services they want and need. Fundamentally, having a focus on citizens means we view them as an asset who can make a valuable contribution to the Borough. Level 1: Responds appropriately to citizens Level 2: Always asks “what does this mean for citizens?” Level 3: Systematically engages with citizens on a regular basis Level 4: Systematically embeds a citizen focused culture Source: http://www.lambeth.gov.uk/sites/default/files/ec- lambeth-behaviours-cooperative-council.pdf
  11. 11. © OECD AjointinitiativeoftheOECDandtheEuropeanUnion, principallyfinancedbytheEU Group exercise: Barriers and obstacles to culture change In your group, identify the THREE top barriers to quality improvement resulting from the cultures in your organisation and discuss how they might be overcome (giving actual examples, where possible, of where this has been achieved). 11

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