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[Infographic] The History of Barcodes - Ringing Up Sales Past, Present, and Future

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The next time you're in a long checkout line, you may want to consider yourself lucky. Why? Although waiting may be an annoyance, your wait time could be twice as long if a little thing called a barcode hadn’t been invented.

But do you know the history of the barcode?

Check out the SICK USA blog to learn more about the past, present, and future of barcodes and RFID technology: www.sickusablog.com/barcode-history/

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[Infographic] The History of Barcodes - Ringing Up Sales Past, Present, and Future

  1. 1. Follow us, like us, share, tweet, subscribe to the blog and contribute on your platform of choice. *Statistics from http://www.birchwoodenterprises.com/a2bnews/A2B_Barcode_TimelineHiRes_withlinks.pdf THE HISTORY OF BARCODES From the first bull’s-eye barcode to the future of RFID, barcode scanning technology has established itself as an integral part of our lives. But do you know the history? In 1967, SICK released its first bar code identification system. The first UPC, Universal Product Code, was implemented in a U.S. grocery store in 1974. A pack of chewing gum was the first item ever scanned. Learn more cool facts about the past, present, and future of barcodes! Barcodes were originally developed and implemented to improve processes. They have now become an integral way for businesses to ensure quality, improve efficiency and manage inventory. Below are examples of emerging uses of 2D barcodes and RFID technology. We can expect to see 2D barcodes increase and expand to other brands and industries, and the future of RFID is promising although there is still a long way to go. One manufacturer of packaged food uses 2D barcodes to track product expirations so that no expired products end up on store shelves. RFID can identify the items in a bin without opening a container and scanning the contents individually. A snack foods company is using 2D to embed information about where the snack’s contents are from to more quickly identify products in case of a recall. Visit SICK USA’s blog for the full two-part post of the History of Barcodes, www.sickusablog.com RFID 1952 Joe Woodland and Bernie Silver patent a bull’s-eye barcode - appropriately named for its circular shape. 1974 The first 1D barcode is used to scan a pack of gum. IBM engineer George Laurer is credited with developing the 1D barcode. 1977 Barcode scanners start to appear in grocery stores. By 1980 the barcode is being adopted by 8000 stores each year.* 1994 2000s Retailers are recognizing the benefits of RFID systems that enable identification without contact between reader and object. . 2D barcodes are introduced with the invention of checkerboard symbology Data Matrix by Data Matrix, Inc.* represent data using parallel lines of varying widths and spacing. 1D codes hold about 20 characters. 1D BARCODES use rectangles, dots, hexagons, and patterns and can contain 100x the information of 1D barcodes. 2D codes can import data from databases and efficiently integrate with existing tracking methods. require no visual contact between reader and object. Benefits include read/write, high read rates, and encrypted data. 2D BARCODES RFID CODES 3 COMMON CODE TYPES BARCODE HISTORY INTO THE FUTURE
  • KimberlyMeisinger

    Jul. 20, 2015

The next time you're in a long checkout line, you may want to consider yourself lucky. Why? Although waiting may be an annoyance, your wait time could be twice as long if a little thing called a barcode hadn’t been invented. But do you know the history of the barcode? Check out the SICK USA blog to learn more about the past, present, and future of barcodes and RFID technology: www.sickusablog.com/barcode-history/

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