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Strengthening collaboration at the WASH, food and nutrition nexus to build community resilience in low income countries (WASHnut)

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Presentation by George Obondo, ICRAF, at the SIANI Members Meeting in Nairobi, November 14th 2018

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Strengthening collaboration at the WASH, food and nutrition nexus to build community resilience in low income countries (WASHnut)

  1. 1. Strengthening collaboration at the WASH, food and nutrition nexus to build community resilience in low income countries (WASHnut) Presented By: George Obondo on 14th Nov. 2018 SIANI Meeting, ICRAF Nairobi, Kenya Contact: Obondo_George@kya.salvationarmy.org
  2. 2. Linkages Between Water, Sanitation And Food Production For Food And Nutrition Security (2016)
  3. 3. Key findings • Sanitation is both an opportunity and a threat: Well managed sanitation can promote food and nutrition, security, while poor sanitation is a source of contaminants endangering health, environmental and nutritional security • Integrated management of water, sanitation and hygiene offers critical opportunities for promoting food and nutritional security • Integrated management is technically feasible. However it is hampered by several barriers, including silo thinking, lack of cross-sectoral communication and lack of working models. • To promote integrated management, there is a need for cross sectoral goals, knowledge-sharing and dissemination of well illustrated cased studies of cross sectoral management experiences
  4. 4. Expert group 2 (2017) Strengthening collaboration at the WASH, food and nutrition nexus to build community resilience in low income countries (WASHnut) Objective: Find 10 case studies, development country focus Synthesize practical guidance how to link WASH, food and nutrition security sectors and ways of operationalizing resilience within development projects. Questions: 1) motivation, 2) facilitation in early stages, 3) overcoming challenges, 4) resilience and cross-sectoral work
  5. 5. Guiding questions used for the study Questions: 1. Motivation 2. Facilitation in early stages 3. Overcoming challenges, 4. Resilience and cross-sectoral work
  6. 6. Cross-sectoral case studies • PeePoople (Kenya) • International Aid Service (Kenya) • Sanergy (Kenya) • The Salvation Army (Kenya) • Centre for Community Initiatives (Tanzania) • Action for Rural Women’s Empowerment (Uganda) • Sumaj Huasi Foundation (Bolivia) • Swedish Agricultural University (Sweden) • Save the Children (Burkina Faso)
  7. 7. Motivation
  8. 8. What motivates cross-sectoral projects? Stick (Push factors) •Crisis •Complexity •Demand driven •Healthy community needed Carrot (Pull factors) • Government encouragement • Research inspired • Economic • Environment • Added value/benefit • Prestige
  9. 9. What challenges at intervention stage are specific to cross-sectoral projects? • Policy/standards: Lack of support from legal system. Lack of standards and certification • Government support: Lack of coordination between authorities representing different sectors, unclear responsibilities • Multiple partners: time required for discussion, MoUs etc • Staff capacity: Capacity to work on complex community problems across sectors, knowledge of entire value chains, technology • Users: Social stigma. Safety concerns. Lack of acceptance. Lack of knowledge on technology use
  10. 10. Which factors facilitate the early stages of cross-sectoral projects? • Attitude: Positive attitude. Willing to collaborate with other sectors, goodwill • Starting small: demonstrating pilot. Trying things small prior to scaling up • Learning: Willing to try new things and learn from mistakes • Local engagement: User acceptance. Ownership by local people • Research support: cost-effective and context specific research findings • Context understanding: contextual system understanding. Platforms for cross-sectoral discussions
  11. 11. Workshop: Nairobi (4-6th of Dec 2017)
  12. 12. Visit to TSA, Kibera
  13. 13. Key messages and learnings • Cross-sectoral projects require more resources (time, funds, knowledge and skills) and require more intensive planning, but have high positive impact • Cross-sectoral work is way to address complex challenges in communities • Importance of different sector-specific cultures • Business opportunities within WASH-nutrition-food security sectors and reuse. Economic empowerment is glue between sectors Key stakeholders: business, government, capacity building organisations
  14. 14. SIANI group references Link to news story and presentation with case studies (2018) https://www.siani.se/news-story/food-water-sanitation-and-hygiene-tie-a-knot/ Link to discussion brief (2017) https://www.siani.se/wp- content/uploads/2017/10/water_ag_sanitation_siani_discussion_brief_aug17_fo r_the_web.pdf

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