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SHT, India 4th Annual Conference Souvenir.

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Souvenir of 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy (SHT), India. 12th & 13th December, 2015 at Pune

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SHT, India 4th Annual Conference Souvenir.

  1. 1. 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy (SHT), India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Venue: Pathology Lecture Hall, B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune-411001, Maharashtra, India. Theme: “Helping Hands”
  2. 2. Souvenir compiled, prepared & edited by Punita V. Solanki With support from all the office bearers of SHT, India and editorial assistance by Charmie A. Dave December, 2015, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  3. 3. 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Venue: Pathology Lecture Hall, B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune-411001, Maharashtra, India. Telephone Number: 020-26128000 Extension: 2345 Theme: “Helping Hands” Table of Contents S. No. Topics Page No. 1 Message from President of Indian Society for Surgery of the Hand 4 2 Message from Member of Legislative Assembly, Pune 5 3 Message from the Dean of B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune 6 4 Message from President of Society for Hand Therapy, India 7 5 Message from Vice-President of Society for Hand Therapy, India 8 6 Message from Secretary of Society for Hand Therapy, India 9 7 Message from Organizing Secretary of the 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 10 8 Message from Scientific Committee Chairperson of the 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 11 9 Message from President of International Federation of Societies for Hand Therapy 12 10 About Society for Hand Therapy, India 13-15 11 Office Bearers of Society for Hand Therapy, India (Current & Past) and Conference Organizing Committee 16-19 12 Conference Brochure and Scientific Programme 20-29 13 Abstracts of Oral Papers, Poster Papers, and Mini Movies. Essay Writing 30-52 14 Expert Opinion One Liners 53-57 15 Membership Details of Society for Hand Therapy, India and Memories of Past Conferences 58-64 16 Press Release and Trade Exhibitions 65-74
  4. 4. Message from President of Indian Society for Surgery of the Hand (ISSH) From the desk of the President, ISSH Dear Friends, It gives me immense pleasure to write a message for the 4th Annual National Conference of the Society for Hand Therapy, being held in the beautiful city of Pune. As the President of ISSH, I can fully understand the importance of hand therapy and the aptly coined conference theme “Helping Hands” reflects the importance of hand therapy succinctly. I have gone through the scientific program and could see its rich qualitative academic content. I am also able to envisage its great potential to discuss and learn the art and science of hand therapy. It is important to develop an attitude towards research and evidence building in every scientific sphere and this conference would be a major step towards this goal in the field of hand therapy. I wish the Conference a great success. I am sure the Conference be a grand scientific extravaganza. Dr Prakash Kotwal, MS (Orth) Professor & Head, Department of Orthopaedics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Ansari Nagar, New Delhi - 110 029, India President, Indian Society for Surgery of the Hand Ex. AO Trustee, India Hospital - 011-26593341/26594519 Mobile - +91 9868129599 ⎈ Email id: prakash.kotwal@gmail.com
  5. 5. Message from Member of Legislative Assembly, Pune To whomsoever it may concern I would like to welcome all the delegates from all over the country who have come together to Pune to attend the national hand therapy conference held at Sassoon Hospital. My best wishes to all of you for seeking this path towards gaining and spreading knowledge. Congratulations Shri. Girish Bapat, M.L.A Kasba Peth, Pune, Maharashtra, India Primary Party: Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) Cabinet Minister of Food, Civil Supplies and Consumer Protection, Food and Drugs Administration, and Parliamentary Affairs, Government of Maharashtra Member of the Maharashtra Legislative Assembly, Kasba Peth, Pune (Since 1995, for 5 Consecutive Terms) Address: Flat. No. 105, Amay Apartment, 212 Shaniwar Peth, Pune - 411030, Maharashtra, India
  6. 6. Message from the Dean of B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune Hand injuries are gradually on the rise because of increasing number of road traffic accidents and trauma. It is now established fact that hand therapy is an integral part of rehabilitation of these patients and it helps to regain the lost function. Organizing events for Hand therapy is a great initiative and will help in promoting this specialty of hand therapy for the benefit of the patients. I wish the organizing committee all the very best in this endeavour. Dr. Ajay S. Chandanwale, MS (Ortho) Dean, B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India Website: http://www.bjmcpune.org
  7. 7. Message from President of Society for Hand Therapy, India Pune is known for education and training, which attract migrants, students, and professionals from India, South East Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. It has been the seat of knowledge for many years. I cordially welcome all delegates and experts, to this academic extravaganza in the field of Hand Therapy, hosted at B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra on 12th and 13th December, 2015. The field of medicine has seen specialization and super specializations for almost 2 decades now. There is a growing need and increasing demand for specialization in the field of occupational and physical therapy. Hand therapy is one such area of practice. The Society of Hand Therapy was founded in 2007 and strives to further the profession by conducting educative courses, workshops and conference. Since, 2012 the society has also started conducting the Hand Therapy certification test, to give credibility to practicing therapists and instill confidence of quality in patients and referring clinicians. I am sure the therapists attending this conference will gain from the scientific sessions, discussions and pave their own paths towards a successful hand therapy profession. I thank all, the organizing secretary and the scientific committee, for their continued efforts toward making this conference a success. Dr. Amol Sangekar, OTR/L (USA) Director, Shoulder and Knee at Rehabcare, Mumbai, India Fellowship in Shoulder Rehabilitation President, Society for Hand Therapy, India
  8. 8. Message from Vice-President of Society for Hand Therapy, India It is my pleasure to pen down my thoughts on the occasion of 4thAnnual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India to be held on 12th& 13th December, 2015 at B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India. I have been personally involved with this organization since its early days, it is still young and budding, and many a miles to go. The 4th academic meet at Sassoon Hospital, an iconic centre in the state of Maharashtra, would prove to be a significant moment in the annals of SHT-I. India often called as the global powerhouse of young skilled workforce, also has a flip side to this success story. There is a proportionately growing population with dysfunctional hand due increasingly demanding socio-economic fabric. Therefore there is a rising need for hand therapists who are skilled, enthusiastic, knowledgeable, committed and sensitive. It is India’s need of the hour to maintain this sustained growth in terms of its robust workforce, and to make that happen it is critical that people with functional limitations become integral part of this workforce with reasonable competency. The hand therapists will have to face challenges of constraints, rise up to the occasion and shoulder this enormous social responsibility. With the theme “Helping Hands”, the 4th academic meet will definitely go a long way to energize young minds to walk the talk in the field of hand rehabilitation. Dr. Shovan Saha, MOT, PhD Associate Professor (Department of Occupational Therapy) SOAHS, Manipal University, Manipal, Udupi-576104, Karnataka Vice President, Society for Hand Therapy, India
  9. 9. Message from Secretary of Society for Hand Therapy, India We are greatly honored to invite all the delegates for the 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India to be held on 12th& 13th December, 2015 at B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India. I personally witness, the growth of Society of Hand therapy, India as one of the eminent society and life member of International federation of societies for hand therapy (IFSHT) since it is started in 2009. Hand is the primary sensory organ that permits to see around us even in darkness. Human hand represents 40 percent of the somato-sensory cortex. Trauma, orthopedic and neurological condition could compromise the Hand & upper limb function. Hand injuries comprise around 6.65 % to 28% of all injuries and 28 % of all musculoskeletal injuries in the world. An individual with hand injuries may face challenges in the biological, mental, and socioeconomic dominion of a person. To address this emerging demand of rehabilitation need for hands and upper limb related disability, the hand therapists have a huge role to rehabilitation and restore them as functional wellbeing into the community. In addition, Human hands have been considered as a symbol of “power” and “strength” in ancient literatures that associated with one’s life, riches and honor. Hand is also considered as a symbol of “action” and a tool to bless others. Therefore, we, the hand therapist aimed to restore hand functions of individual’s with hand-related disability with their “blessing hands." The 4th Annual National conference with a theme of “Helping Hands’ aimed to provide a common platform for physiotherapist and occupational therapist to share their knowledge and evidence in treating hand and upper limb related disorders. We wish to thank all the participants, sponsors, and invited speakers and scientific advisory board and volunteers and those who have contributed in the successful organization of great events. With best wishes, Dr. Suresh Mani, Secretary, Society for Hand Therapy, India PhD Scholar (Telerehabilitation) School of Rehabilitation National University of Malaysia (UKM), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  10. 10. Message from Organizing Secretary of the 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India Dear Guest Speakers, Chairpersons and Participants On behalf of the organizing committee, the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department members and the staff members of our B. J. Government Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune, I do welcome all of you in the occasion of “Fourth Annual National Hand Therapy Conference” on 12th December and 13th December, 2015. Thank you very much for giving me an opportunity to organize this conference in Pune and in my esteemed institute. The event is meant to update the theoretical knowledge and the hand therapy skills of our colleagues working in the field of hand therapy & rehabilitation in India. There was a time when Pune was known as a Pensioner’s Paradise - home to those who had retired and wanted a peaceful life in a salubrious environment. Now of course Pune has grown into a vibrant metro, a hub of education, industry, information technology, entertainment, and so on. B. J. Medical College (BJMC), Pune is one of the premier medical institutions in Maharashtra, India. The college, administered by the Government of Maharashtra, comprises clinical and para/pre-clinical departments working along-side the Sassoon General Hospitals. The B. J. Medical School was started in 1878 and was converted to full-fledged B. J. Medical College in 1946. It has consistently ranked among the top 10 medical colleges in India for several years. The conference program encompasses about many sessions including talks covering most of hand rehabilitation topics. I extend my warm welcome to all our participants, from everywhere in India, hoping the most benefits from this grand gathering in our hospital. Much thanks are endorsed to our valuable teams, and colleagues in our hospital and from outside who spent much time and efforts and are dedicated to the success of this conference. Dr. Ganesh Pande Head of Rehabilitation Unit, B. J. Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune, Maharashtra, India Organizing Secretary, 4th Annual National Conference of SHT, India
  11. 11. Message from Scientific Committee Chairperson of the 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India In the capacity of a Scientific Committee Chairperson of the 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India, I extend my heartfelt warm welcome to all the expert faculty members, participants and delegates. We assure you a great deal of knowledge sharing and expert interactions during this academic feast on hand therapy at Pune, Maharashtra, India. It is an honor to work for Scientific Committee with zeal of enthusiasm, motivation, passion, curiosity and expertise in the field of hand therapy and orthopaedic rehabilitation. This national event will be academically beneficial to all men and women, young and old, amateurs and professionals, therapists and other allied healthcare professionals, who are passionate about care and cure of hand (upper quarter region of the body). The scientific committee program includes delivery of talks by expert professionals dealing with ailments pertaining to hand and upper quarter region of the body, research paper presentations in oral and poster format, mini movie presentations, essay competition and display of expert opinion one-liners from experienced hand rehabilitation professionals. The scientific programme is a compact package of all-encompassing continuing educational event as well as sharing of research findings, during the most pleasant winter season of the year in India. Presenters will be excited to know that there will be best paper award, best mini movie award and best essay award as judged by experienced professionals present during the conference. Best Wishes and Warm Regards On Behalf of Scientific Committee: Punita V. Solanki, MSc (O.T.), ADCR (ACE), Mumbai Ex-Assistant Professor and Ex-Care Member of Seth G. S. Medical College & King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Parel East, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Freelance Occupational Therapist, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Consultant Occupational Therapist, NM Medical, Malad West, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Assistant Editor, Indian Journal of Occupational Therapy Executive Committee Member, Society for Hand Therapy (SHT), India
  12. 12. Message from International Federation of Societies for Hand Therapy It is wonderful to hear that the Indian Hand Therapy is having their 4th annual conference. Annual national hand therapy conferences are the most often used medium for national Hand Therapy societies to support and encourage the sharing of information among therapists. I wish you all much success with the meeting and hope that new perspectives are gained by all who participate in the meeting. Please inform participants about IFSHT, the upcoming Congress in Buenos Aires, next year and the newly created Cristina Alegri Award for innovation in Hand Therapy. Best wishes for a successful conference, Sarah Ewald B.Sc. in Occupational Therapy, University of Oklahoma, USA M. A. Education, University of Phoenix, USA President, IFSHT IFSHT Website: http://www.ifsht.org
  13. 13. About Society for Hand Therapy, India Hearty Congratulations to all the stakeholders involved in the organization of the conference, preparation of the souvenir and who will benefit from this event. It is a proud privilege to welcome you all to Society for Hand Therapy, India. We started this journey many years back. Foundation of the society was initiated at first meeting, for the formation of Hand Therapy Society on 14th January, 2007 at Hotel Tip Top Plaza, Thane, Mumbai, India. Though there were under-currents flowing before this, may be from July, 2006. Like-minded people involved themselves in brainstorming discussions. We all had mission, which is now our mission or Society for Hand Therapy’s mission “The mission of the society is to represent the professional group of hand therapy in India and to endeavour to support the development of knowledge and skills within this field to members, in order to facilitate the delivery of the highest quality of care in the field of practice.” Shrikant Chinchalkar Sir guided us during these formation years of the society. SHT, India Logo was designed by Amol Sangekar. Later time line of events goes as follows: First Affiliation with International Federation of Societies for Hand Therapy(IFSHT) in January, 2008 Course on Physical Agent Modalities by Payal Katyal and Arun Maiya in February, 2009 Registration of the Society for Hand Therapy, India (SHT-I) under Society Act at the Charity Commissioner office, Mumbai in September, 2009 Website of SHT-I was launched in October, 2009 URL: http://hotc4u.tripod.com/isht/ First Newsletter for the SHT-I was published in November, 2009 Course on “Recent Advances in Management of Elbow” was conducted by Shrikant Chinchalkar in December, 2009 Permanent Account Number for the Society was obtained in January, 2010 Nationwide Network was established in January, 2010 Website for the First National Conference of Hand Therapy was launched in February, 2010
  14. 14. URL: http://indianhands2010.webs.com/ Course on Physical Agent Modalities in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation was conducted by Supriya Sakpal, Prabhakar Chavan and Bhavesh Shah in May, 2010 & February 2011. Till date we have conducted five such workshops. Delegate Council Meeting of International Federation at the 8th Triennial Hand Therapy Conference at Orlando, Florida, USA was attended by Hemant Nandgaonkar in June, 2010 Scientific Paper presentation at the 8th Triennial Conference, 2010 by Hemant Nandgaonkar General Body Meeting was conducted in July, 2010 at Lion Bapa Tarachand Hospital, Sion Collaborated with Handicap International for the training by German Hand Therapist to be conducted in the year 2011. Key Contributions by Tony Thomas (Gujarat), Shovan Saha (Karnataka) Second Newsletter for the Public Awareness was released in July, 2010 New advisor Manisha Sharma, OTR, CHT, Florida, USA, ASHT EC Member was suggested Management of the accounts by Mugdha Wagh Shaan Donation for printing of activity report of 2010 was by Provo Centre, Mumbai, India Membership Card for all the members was coordinated by Prabhakar Chavan and Shalaka Nandgaonkar, Mumbai, India Designing of the certificates, banner for the National conferences and courses by Shalaka Nandgaonkar, Mumbai, India Management of the conference and course venue, accommodation by Amol Sangekar, Mugdha Wagh Shaan, and Shashikant Chandanshive Valuable and timely advice were received from Shrikant Chinchalkar (USA), Kavita P. Mulgaonkar and Snehal P. Desai, Mumbai, India Appointment of the new advisor Manisha Sharma in September, 2010 Compilation and editing of Activity Report of 2010 by Hemant P. Nandgaonkar Representation at the annual AIOTA national conference in 2010 by Amol Sangekar, Shovan Saha for the awareness. Banner and stall were donated by Shovan Saha, Occupational Therapy Department, MAHE, Manipal Donation for the silent auction at 8th Triennial Hand Therapy conference, 2010 at Florida by Shovan Saha, Snehal Desai and Hemant Nandgaonkar Collaborated with Elsevier Publication for discount on Journal of Hand Therapy (International Journal) for the members of Society for Hand Therapy, India. (By Hemant Nandgaonkar) Conference in Chandigarh, September 2012 was attended by Shovan Saha and Hemant Nandgaonkar with presentation.
  15. 15. 9th Triennial Congress of International Federation of Societies for Hand Therapy (IFSHT) in March, 2013 in New Delhi featured many Indian Hand Therapists across the country, with diligent attendance and participation in scientific presentations. 2nd Annual National Conference organized at Manipal, in collaboration with Indian Society for Surgery of Hand in November, 2011 Celebrated 5th anniversary in September, 2014 at Hotel Tip Top Plaza, Thane, Mumbai, India. 3rd Annual National Conference of SHT-I was organized in Mumbai in September, 2014 Conducted election under the supervision of Savita Savardekar in 2014 and new committee took charge of the SHT, India in September, 2014 during 5th anniversary celebrations. The new committee (second committee) started functioning in the capacity of office bearers after the meeting held in December, 2014, between the outgoing and upcoming committee members, in Mumbai, India. Their office tenure will be from September, 2014 to September, 2019. Conducted three Hand Therapy certification examinations so far. We will continue to do more work for the best care of our patients. Future Goals and Mission: Society will Advocate for the profession of hand therapy with employers, third-party payers, consumers, and other health-care professionals Participate in ongoing professional development Participate in activities and associations that advance professional practice and public welfare Develop and implement educational programs for professionals Participate in clinical research Participate in professional development of students and/or other therapists Wish you all best of luck in all the ventures of life…………not just related to Hand Therapy Thank you Hemant P Nandgaonkar, MSc (O.T. in Hand) Assistant Professor (Occupational Therapy) Seth G. S. Medical College, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Parel East, Mumbai, India Ex-Officio, SHT, India
  16. 16. Office Bearers of Society for Hand Therapy, India; Year 2015-2019 Current Office Bearers of Society for Hand Therapy, India (2015-2019) President: Amol Sangekar, BSc (O.T.) Mumbai, OTR/L (USA) Contact: Mobile: +91-9821294029 Email id: asangekar73@gmail.com Vice-President: Shovan Saha, MOT, PhD Contact: Mobile: +91- 9880059426 Email id: shovansaha@yahoo.com Treasurer: Mugdha Wagh Shaan, BSc (O.T.) Contact: Mobile: +91-8655841686 Email id: mugdhawaghshaan@gmail.com Secretary: Suresh Mani, PhD Scholar Contact: Mobile: +60182335703 / +91-7299552260 Email id: vemsuresh@gmail.com Joint-Secretary: Prabhakar Chavan, BSc (P.T.) Contact: Mobile: +91-9821211279 ⎈ Email id: chavan.prabhakar2015@gmail.com Executive Committee Member: Punita V. Solanki, MSc (O.T.), ADCR (ACE), Mumbai Contact: Mobile: +91-9820621352 (Official Phone Calls/SMS) Email id: therapistindia@gmail.com Ex-Officio: Hemant P. Nandgaonkar, MSc (O.T.) Contact: Mobile: +91-9819660953 ⎈ Email id: nandgaonkar.hemant@gmail.com
  17. 17. Conference Organizing Committee 4th Annual National Conference of SHT, India, 2015 at Pune Conference Organizing Committee 4th Annual National Conference, 2015 Organizing Secretary: Ganesh Pande, OT Contact: +91-9423009353 Email id: jayaganesh_in@yahoo.com Scientific Committee Chairperson: Punita V. Solanki, MSc (O.T.), ADCR (ACE), Mumbai Contact: Mobile: +91-9167180215 (WhatsApp) Email id: orthorehab.punita@gmail.com Scientific Committee Member: Charmie A. Dave, MSOT, OTR/L (USA) Contact: +91-9869651798 Email id: charmiedave@gmail.com
  18. 18. Past Office Bearers of the Society for Hand Therapy, India (Year 2009-2014) Advisor: Shrikant Chinchalkar, OTR, CHT Certified Hand Therapist, London, Ontario, Canada President: Hemant P. Nandgaonkar, MSc OT (Hand) Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy, Seth G. S. Medical College, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Ex-Lecturer, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Occupational Therapy, Nerul, Navi Mumbai, India Vice President: Shovan Saha, MOT, PhD Principal, Department of Occupational Therapy College of Allied Health Sciences, MAHE, Manipal Treasurer: Mugdha Wagh Shaan, BSc (OT) Occupational Therapist, PROVAO Rehab Center, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Secretary: Amol Sangekar, BSc (OT)/OTR (USA) Director, Rehabcare, Vile Parle, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Joint Secretary: Prabhakar Chavan, BSc (PT) Senior Physical Therapist, Lion Bapa Tarachand Hospital, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Executive Committee Members: Kavita P. Mulgaonkar Ex-Professor & Head, Occupational Therapy School, T. N. Medical College, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Stephen Brian Austin Sams Professor & Head, Occupational Therapy School, Seth G. S. Medical College, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Snehal P. Desai Lecturer, Occupational Therapy Occupational Therapy School, Seth G. S. Medical College, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  19. 19. NAGPUR WING Convener: Sofia H. Azad Associate Professor, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India PUNE WING Convener: Tushar Palekar Principal, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pune, Maharashtra, India PONDICHERRY WING Convener: Mahesh Kawle Pondicherry Government General Hospital, India GUJRAT WING Convener: Thomas Tony Assistant Professor, Ahmedabad Institute for Medical Sciences, Gujarat, India WEST BENGAL WING Convener: Suresh Mani, MPT Physical Therapist, Hand Therapy, HOD, Department of Physical Therapy, The Leprosy Mission Hospital, Purulia, West Bengal, India
  20. 20. Conference Brochure & Scientific Programme
  21. 21. 1 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Pune, Maharashtra, India Theme: Helping Hands Office Bearers of Society for Hand Therapy (SHT), India: Dr. Amol Sangekar (President) Dr. Shovan Saha (Vice President) Dr. Mugdha Wagh Shaan (Treasurer) Dr. Suresh Mani (Secretary) Dr. Prabhakar Chavan (Joint-Secretary) Dr. Punita V. Solanki (Executive Committee Member) Dr. Hemant P. Nandgaonkar (Ex-Officio) Organizing Committee: (4th Annual National Conference) Dr. Ganesh Pande Organizing Secretary Dr. Punita V. Solanki Scientific Committee Chairperson Dr. Charmie A. Dave Scientific Committee Co-Member Venue: Pathology Lecture Hall, B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune-411001, Maharashtra, India Telephone Number: 020-26128000 Extension: 2345 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Pune, Maharashtra, India Theme: Helping Hands
  22. 22. 2 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Pune, Maharashtra, India Theme: Helping Hands 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy (SHT), India Theme: “Helping Hands” Dear Colleagues It is our great pleasure to invite you to participate in the fourth Annual National Conference of the Society for Hand Therapy (SHT), India, to be held on 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015, in Pune, Maharashtra, India. This event will be one of its kind and a unique platform for all Hand Therapists, Physical Therapists and Occupational Therapists. It will be a great opportunity for experts to share their valuable knowledge and the art and science of rehabilitation of the upper quarter of the human body. The scientific program will offer a platform to witness presentations on current and future trends as regards specialized skills in assessment and treatment to promote the goals of prevention of dysfunction, restoration of function and/or reversal of the progression of pathology, in order to enhance participation in life roles, for individuals with upper quarter disease or injury. The academic meet will enable attendees to update their knowledge, confirm their current practices and receive valuable take home information for their clinical practice, academic enhancement and future research goals. We look forward to having you with us at the conference. Sincerely From Organizing Team of the 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India Registration Details Delegate Fees: Members: INR 2000/- Non Members: INR 2750/- Students: INR 2350/- Spot Registration: INR 4000/- (After 1st December, 2015) For Registration: Mode of Payment: Cheque, Demand Draft or Net Banking Cheque or Demand Draft should be in favour of "Society for Hand Therapy" Payable at Mumbai Funds Transfer through Net banking (RTGS/NEFT facility) Account Number: 013110022586 Account Type: Savings Name of the Bank: Dena Bank Branch: Juhu-Vile Parle Branch IFSC CODE: BKDN0460131 Address: Sharda Bhuvan, V. M. Road, Juhu, Vile Parle (West), Mumbai - 400056, Maharashtra, India Address for Sending Registration Fees: Dr. Ganesh Pande Flat 13, Sitakeshar Sakal Nagar, Baner Road, Pune-411007, Maharashtra, India Mobile No.: +91-9423009353 Email: jayaganesh_in@yahoo.com
  23. 23. 3 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Pune, Maharashtra, India Theme: Helping Hands Presentations on Hand Splints Demonstrations of Adaptive Devices Demonstrations of Exercise Equipments Demonstrations of Evaluation Instruments Continuing Hand Therapy Educational Courses/Guest Lectures (1 Hour/20 minutes) Poster Presentations: (Size limit: 4 feet X 3 feet) Scientific, Original Research Study & Case Study Presentations Scientific, Secondary Research Study Presentations e.g. Narrative Reviews, Systematic Reviews Presentations on Hand Splints Demonstrations of Adaptive Devices Demonstrations of Exercise Equipments Demonstrations of Evaluation Instruments Mini Movie: on application of latest advancements in Hand Therapy (Time limit: 6 minute’s duration) Essay Competition: on “Practice of Hand Therapy: Indian Vs Global Scenario” (Word limit: 1500 words) Expert “One Liner”: from the experienced hand therapy professionals, in their fields of expertise and interest, to be included in the SHT, India conference souvenir, as golden messages to the amateur hand therapy professionals. Please Note: your session timings, be specific to your topic to avoid repetition, do quote evidence wherever you can. Please be at the conference venue, an hour before your scheduled time to load your presentation. Contact for Scientific Committee Queries: Dr. Punita V. Solanki Email: orthorehab.punita@gmail.com Mobile No.: +91-9820621352 Dr. Charmie A. Dave Mobile No.: +91-9869651798 General Information for the Speakers: Design images so that information to be presented is centered on the image area of the screen. Keep letters and numbers as large as possible, so they are visible to attendees farthest from the screen. For average back-row viewing distances, larger letter height is advised. Use a maximum of 5-6 words per line and a maximum of 4 lines, per slide. For optimum effect, use 10 or fewer words on a slide. Use strong, bold, sans serif typefaces (such as Arial) for reading ease. Avoid using all upper case. Provide ample spacing between words and letters. Word choice should be simple. Use active voice, short sentences with appropriate syntax. Projected images should reinforce spoken words. You might be required to consent to agree that your presentation material, photos and videos might be used for SHT, India conference souvenir to be uploaded on the SHT, India website. Please email your Abstracts up to 500 words in Times New Roman font with 12 font size, 1.5 spacing in justified alignment, in MS-Word doc format & single slide CV in ppt format to orthorehab.punita@gmail.com to include in the SHT, India conference souvenir (On or Before 20th November, 2015) Conference Presentations will include: Oral Presentations: (10 minutes duration) Scientific, Original Research Study & Case Study Presentations Scientific, Secondary Research Study Presentations e.g. Narrative Reviews, Systematic Reviews
  24. 24. REGISTRATION FORM 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Pune, Maharashtra, India Theme: Helping Hands First Name Middle Name Surname Name: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Age/Gender: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Qualifications: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Profession/Affiliation: ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Postal Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mobile Number: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Email Id: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Society for Hand Therapy, India Membership Number: _______________________________________________________ Mode of Payment Indicate: (Demand Draft/Cheque/Net Transfer). Amount Paid: ______________________________________________ Net Transaction/Demand Draft/Cheque Number: _____________________________________________________________ Bank Name: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Bank Branch: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of Payment: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Official Use Registration Serial Number: _____________________________________________________________________________________ Payment Confirmation: __________________________________________________________________________________________ Contact for Further Details Dr. Ganesh Pande: Flat 13, Sitakeshar Sakal Nagar, Baner Road, Pune-411007, Maharashtra, India Mobile No.: +91-9423009353 ⎈ Email: jayaganesh_in@yahoo.com Delegate Fees Members: INR 2000/- Non Members: INR 2750/- Students: INR 2350/- Spot Registration: INR 4000/- (After 1st December, 2015)
  25. 25. 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Venue: Pathology Lecture Hall, B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune-411001, Maharashtra, India. Telephone Number: 020-26128000 Extension: 2345 Theme: (elping (ands Dear Partners, We are proud to announce the 4thAnnual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India on 12th (Saturday) and 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 at Pune. We would expect all our members and non-members interested in the therapy of upper- extremity, to attend this national event. Participants will attend to upgrade their knowledge in this field of therapy and learn about new equipments, books and other resources and opportunities in this specialized area of practice. Our audience will include Hand Surgeons (Orthopaedic Surgeons, Plastic Surgeons and General Surgeons) Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists, Orthotists, Prosthetists and other Allied Healthcare Practitioners interested in Hand Therapy, whoare either into general practice of their respective profession or are specialists in the area of upper-extremity care and rehabilitation.It will be a great opportunity for your business, to displaytherapeutic products, job opportunities, books and other therapy related products. S. No. Available Options for Business Product Advertisement INR 1. Quarter page INR 1,000.00 2. Half page INR 1,600.00 3. Full page INR 3,000.00 4. Inside front cover INR 5,500.00 5. Inside back cover INR 5,000.00 6. Back cover INR 7,000.00 7. Small Banner at the venue: 4x5 INR 7,500.00 8. Large Banner at the venue: 7x8 INR 9,500.00 9. Stall at the venue INR 10,000.00 10. Stationary sponsor (includes folder, writing pad and pen) INR 10,000.00 + stationary 11. Guest speaker’s travel (sponsor’s will get 7x8 banner space) INR15,500.00 12. Lunch sponsor (sponsor’s will get 7x8 banner space) INR 30,000.00 per day 13. Break sponsor INR 10,000.00 per day 14. Conference bag with your Logo (sponsor’s will get 7x8 banner space) INR 30,000.00 We look forward to your participation in this prestigious event at Pune. Warm Regards Office Bearers and Organizers of Society for Hand Therapy, India Dr. Amol Sangekar President ⎈ Dr. Shovan Saha Vice President ⎈ Dr. Mugdha Wagh Shaan Treasurer Dr. Suresh Mani Secretary ⎈ Dr. Prabhakar Chavan Joint-Secretary ⎈ Dr. Punita V. Solanki Executive Committee Member ⎈ Dr. (emant P. Nandgaonkar Ex-Officio) Contact for Further Details: Conference Organizing Secretary: Dr. Ganesh Pande: Flat 13, Sitakeshar Sakal Nagar, Baner Road, Pune-411007, Maharashtra, India. Mobile No.: +91-9 009 ⎈ Email: jayaganesh_in@yahoo.com
  26. 26. 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India 12th (Saturday) & 13th (Sunday) December, 2015 Venue: Pathology Lecture Hall, B. J. Government Medical College & Sassoon General Hospital, Pune-411001, Maharashtra, India. Telephone Number: 020-26128000 Extension: 2345 Theme: Helping Hands Scientific Programme Schedule Timings Day 1 12th December, 2015, Saturday Day 2 13th December, 2015, Sunday 8.00 am - 8.30 am Registration Registration 8.30 am - 9.00 am Breakfast Breakfast 9.00 am - 9.30 am Hand: Prehension and Biomechanics Dr. B. H. Baheti Professor and HOD (Anatomy Department) B. J. Government Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune Email id: bhbahetee@gmail.com Importance of EMG and NCV: Implications in Upper Limb Rehabilitation Dr. Nilesh Palasdeokar Neurologist, Assistant Professor B. J. Government Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune Email id: nilesh.palasdeokar@gmail.com 9.30 am - 10.00 am Physiological Basis of Hand Functions Dr. A. N. Kowale Professor and HOD (Physiology Department) Deputy Dean, B. J. Government Medical College And Sassoon General Hospitals Pune Email id: ankowale@yahoo.co.in Upper Extremity Orthopaedic Injuries & Post Operative Rehabilitation Dr. Ambarish Mathesul Assistant Professor (Orthopaedic Department) B. J. Government Medical College And Sassoon General Hospitals Pune Email Id: math.amb123@gmail.com 10.00 am - 10.30 am Psychological implications in common upper limb conditions: Role of Psychiatrist. Dr. Smita N. Panse Associate Professor (Psychiatry Department) B. J. Government Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune Email id: nikhil.panse@rediffmail.com Tendon Transfers for Upper Extremity Functional Restoration Dr. Nikhil Panse Associate Professor (Plastic Surgery Department) B. J. Government Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune Email id: nikhil.panse@rediffmail.com 10.30 am - 11.00 am Inaugural Ceremony & Welcome Presentation Understanding Contracture: Therapist’s Perspective Dr. Shovan Saha Associate Professor Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal Karnataka, India. EC Member, ACOT, AIOTA. Vice-President, SHT, India Email id: shovansaha@yahoo.com 11.00 am - 11.15 am Tea/Coffee Break Tea/Coffee Break 11.15 am - 11.45 am Clinical Assessment of Wrist and Hand: Occupational Therapist’s Perspective Dr. Punita V. Solanki Consultant Occupational Therapist, NM Medical, Malad West, Mumbai, India Assistant Editor (IJOT) EC Member, SHT, India Marketing Hand Therapy in India Dr. Amol Sangekar OT & Ergonomic Consultant Mumbai, India President of SHT, India Email id: asangekar@rehabcare.org
  27. 27. Timings Day 1 12th December, 2015, Saturday Day 2 13th December, 2015, Sunday 11.45 am - 12.15 pm Clinical Assessment of Wrist and Hand: Occupational Therapist’s Perspective Dr. Punita V. Solanki Consultant Occupational Therapist, NM Medical, Malad West, Mumbai, India Assistant Editor (IJOT) EC Member, SHT, India Email id: orthorehab.punita@gmail.com Congenital Anomalies of Upper Limb Dr. Minakshi Nalbale Pediatric Surgeon Associate Professor (Surgery Department) B. J. Government Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune Email Id: minakshi_dr@rediffmail.com 12.15 pm - 12.45 pm Hand - As A Mirror of Diseases Dr. Anand Hatgaonkar Associate Professor (Radiology Department) B. J. Government Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune Email Id: anandhatgaonkar@gmail.com Helping Hands and Hand Therapy Dr. Hemant Nandgaonkar Assistant Professor (Occupational Therapy Department) Seth GSMC & KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India Ex-Officio, SHT, India Email id: nandgaonkar.hemant@gmail.com 12.45 pm - 1.15 pm Swan Neck Deformity: A Therapist’s Perspective Dr. Vivek Kulkarni Associate Professor Sancheti College of Physiotherapy, Pune Email id: vnkulkarni19@yahoo.co.in Developmental Progression of Hand & Its Clinical Application in Treatment of Cerebral Palsy Dr. Rucha Thorat MSc (OT), NDT Certified Occupational Therapist, Therapy for Kids Clinic, Pune Maharashtra, India Email id: rucha.thorat@gmail.com 1.15 pm - 2.00 pm Lunch Break Lunch Break 2.00 pm - 2.30 pm Psychometric properties of Pneumatic Squeeze Bulb Dynamometer in measuring grip strength, endurance and their correlation with hand anthropometry Dr. Rashi Goel Assistant Professor Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) Screening of Performance Related Upper Limb Injuries Experienced by Indian Musicians Dr. Ajay Malshikare MPT1 (Hand) Assistant Professor Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) A Correlation Study: The Relationship between Body Mass Index & Upper Body Muscular Endurance in Physiotherapists Dr. Amita Aggarwal Assistant Professor Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) Establishing normative data for upper extremity weight bearing capability in adults Pooja M. Ganacharya MPT2 Student Dr. D. Y. Patil College Of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) Splinting series for a patient with bilateral upper extremity trauma Dr. Atishree Kamdar Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) Immediate Effect of Muscle Energy Technique on Gird in Professional Cricket Bowlers: A Randomized Controlled Trial Antariksha A Suryawanshi MPT2 Student Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) 2.30 pm - 3.00 pm Pain Management in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Dr. Surekha Shinde Associate Professor Government Medical College and Hospital, Solapur Email id: sureshinde@gmail.com Hand in Hansen's Disease Dr. Vasudha Belgaonkar Associate Professor (Dermatology Department) B. J. Government Medical College, Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune Email Id: doc_vasudha@yahoo.co.in
  28. 28. Timings Day 1 12th December, 2015, Saturday Day 2 13th December, 2015, Sunday 3.00 pm - 3.30 pm A Study on Influence of Hand Anthropometry on Grip Strength in Geriatric Population Kunal Sanjay Dhamne MPT student in MSK and Hand Conditions Dr. D.Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) A Comparative Study Of Sustained Inferior Capsular Stretching Versus Passive Joint Mobilization In Treatment Of Adhesive Capsulitis Swagata A. Patangankar MPT2 Student Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) Scapular Dysfunction in Guitar Players Nidhi Atulkumar Shah MPT student Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) Comparative study on co- ordination ability among right and left handed individuals using Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test Anwar Gayasi Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) Post Traumatic Stiffness of Hand: Comparative Study of Home Exercises Program and Personal Manual Exercises Program Dr. Pawan Shirsath Physiotherapist Sassoon General Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India (Oral Paper: 10.00 minutes) Low cost adaptive devices to improve functional ability of the bilateral upper limb deficient patient Dr. Nayna Hatwar Wanjari Occupational Therapist Head of OT Department Sir J. J. Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India (Mini Movie: 6.00 minutes) Use of robotics in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation: ArmeoSpring Dr. Charmie A. Dave Occupational Therapist Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, Andheri West, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India (Mini Movie: 6.00 minutes) 3.30 pm - 4.00 pm Tea/Coffee Break Trade Exhibition + Poster Presentation* Tea/Coffee Break Trade Exhibition + Poster Presentation* Essay Competition Winner Announcement 4.00 pm - 4.30 pm Low Technology Adaptive Devices for Dysfunctional Hand Dr. Shovan Saha Associate Professor Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal Karnataka, India. EC Member, Academic Council of Occupational Therapy, AIOTA. Vice-President, SHT, India Email id: shovansaha@yahoo.com GB Meeting’s Announcements and Valedictory Session 4.30 pm - 5.00 pm Prosthetic Hand Bionic Hand Training Mr. Nitin Bagade CPO, Centre Manager OTTO Bock, Pune Maharashtra, India Email id: information@indiaottobock. com
  29. 29. Posters*: 1 Effectiveness of Pain Release Phenomenon in DeQuervain’s Tenosynovitis: A Case Study (Poster Paper: 10.00 minutes) Dr. Roopa Desai Assistant Professor, Dr. Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India 2 The Efficacy of Sensory Integration on Complex Hand Function like Hand Writing in Benign Hypotonia: A Case Series. (Poster Paper: 10.00 minutes) Dr. Kanan Doshi Lakshya Occupational Therapy Clinic Occupational Therapist Ghatkopar, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Please Note: 1. Expert Opinion One Liners will be displayed throughout the two days of the conference and be printed in the Souvenir. 2. EC Meeting will be held on 11th December, 2015, Friday evening amongst the Office Bearers of Society for Hand Therapy, India and the Organizing Committee of the 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy, India. 3. General Body Meeting will be held on 12th December, 2015, Saturday evening after 5.00 pm We thank all the chairpersons (Dr. Vivek Kulkarni, Dr. Shovan Saha, Dr. Punita V. Solanki, Dr. Ganesh Pande, Dr. Hemant P. Nandgaonkar, & Dr. Sayed Esa), moderators (Dr. Ganesh Pande, Dr. Yogita Chhawchhria, & Dr. Smita Ingle), and scientific presentation’s judges/reviewers (Dr. Nikhil Panse, Dr. Snehal P. Desai, Dr. Chaya Verma, Dr. Vivek Kulkarni, Dr. Amol Sangekar, Dr. Shovan Saha, & Dr. Kanan Doshi) for their active contribution through two days of the conference.
  30. 30. Abstracts (Oral Papers, Poster Papers, Mini Movies & Essay Submissions)
  31. 31. Oral Papers O1 Title: Psychometric properties of Pneumatic Squeeze Bulb Dynamometer in measuring grip strength, endurance and their correlation with hand anthropometry. Authors: Dr. Rashi Goel1, Dr. Pawan Sharma2, Dr. Tushar J. Palekar3 Designation: 1Assistant Professor, 2Assistant Professor, 3Principal & Professor Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, Maharashtra, India Introduction: Grip strength is often used in clinical settings as an indicator of overall physical strength and well-being of an individual. Hand therapists often assess grip strength because it's an easy and non-invasive test that measures the overall muscle power accurately. The Baseline Hydraulic Hand Dynamometer is an inexpensive way to reliably measure hand and finger strength. The Pneumatic Squeeze Bulb dynamometer has been previously tested, and it has been shown to be a reliable instrument to evaluate muscular strength in healthy children. However, studies pertaining to its suitability for the measurement of grip strength and endurance and their correlation with hand anthropometrics are rare. So, the present study is an endeavor to evaluate the psychometric properties of Pneumatic Squeeze Bulb Dynamometer in healthy adults and correlate their values with anthropometrics of the hand. Methodology: 70 healthy subjects fulfilling the selection criteria participated in the study. Height and weight were measured to calculate Body Mass Index (BMI). Hand anthropometrics namely hand shape, palm width, individual finger lengths and perimeters of the dominant hand were measured. Grip strength and isometric grip endurance of the dominant hand were measured with the Baseline Hydraulic Hand Dynamometer and Pneumatic Squeeze Bulb Dynamometer as prescribed by the American Society of Hand Surgeons. Results: Karl Pearson correlation test was used to assess the findings of the study with alpha level set at 0.05. Pneumatic Squeeze Bulb Dynamometer showed high intra rater reliability (ICC= 0.87; 95% C.I. 0.76- 0.93) for grip strength and moderate intra rater reliability (ICC= 0.64; 95% C.I. 0.30-
  32. 32. 0.76) for isometric grip endurance. Strong correlation was found between grip strength (r=0.732, p=0.000) and grip endurance (r=0.881, p=0.000) for both dynamometers. For Pneumatic Squeeze Bulb Dynamometer, grip strength showed strong positive correlation with Body Mass Index (r=0.731, p=0.000), palm width (r=0.752, p=0.000), P3 (r=0.725, p=0.000), P4 (r=0.706, p=0.000) P5 (r=0.748, p=0.000); and moderate positive correlation with thumb length (r=0.581, p=0.000), index finger length (r=0.572, p=0.000), middle finger length (r=0.6, p=0.000), ring finger length (r=0.674, p=0.000), little finger length (r=0.5, p=0.000), P1 (r=0.652, p=0.000) and P2 (r=0.494, p=0.000). However, grip endurance showed weak positive correlation with Body Mass Index (r=0.216, p=0.213); weak negative correlation with palm width (r=-0.352, p=0.038), index finger length (r=- 0.258p=0.134), middle finger length (r=-0.298, p=0.082), ring finger length (r=-0.312, p=0.068), little finger length (r=-0.373, p=0.027), P1 (r=-0.323, p=0.068), P3 (r=-0.364, p=0.032), P4 (r=-0.354, p=0.037) and P5 (r=-0.389, p=0.021) and very weak negative correlation with thumb length (r=- 0.135, p=0.439) and P2 (r=-0.170, p=0.329). Conclusion: Pneumatic Squeeze Bulb Dynamometer proves to be a valid and reliable assessment tool available for the hand therapists for evaluating hand grip strength and endurance. Further, the study also illustrates positive correlation of grip strength with Body Mass Index, palm width, finger lengths and finger parameters. Key words: Grip endurance, reliability, validity. Corresponding Author’s Email id: rashigoelphysio@gmail.com O2 Title: A Correlation Study-The Relationship between Body Mass Index and Upper Body Muscular Endurance in Physiotherapists. Authors: Dr. Amita Aggarwal1, Dr. Tushar Palekar2 Designation: 1Assistant Professor, 2Professor and Principal. Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pimpri, Pune-18. Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess a correlation between Body mass index (BMI) and upper body muscular endurance and to find an impact of obesity on pushups, an upper body endurance measure. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 150 physiotherapists with mean age17-24 years (19± 1.93) without any upper limb pain. BMI was assessed using height and weight measures .Upper body muscular endurance was assessed with push up test. Relationships were explored using
  33. 33. Pearson s correlation coefficient test (r).ANOVA was used for comparison of pushups among various BMI categories. Results: No linear correlation was found between BMI and upper body muscular endurance (r = − . 3 . Among BM) categories, statistically non-significant but clinically significant negative impact was found of obesity on the upper body endurance measure. Conclusion: Obesity affects the endurance component of fitness by abating overall performance level. Keywords: Body mass index, Endurance, Pushup test. Corresponding Author’s Email id: amita.goyal@dpu.edu.in O3 Title: Splinting series for a patient with bilateral upper extremity trauma. Authors: Dr. Atishree Kamdar 1, Dr. Shovan Saha2 Designation: MOT Student, Currently Occupational Therapist in Private Practice1; Associate Professor2 Affiliation: Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal Introduction: Hand splints are powerful tool and play the typical role of prevention, protection and correction. The significance of this study has been the sheer number of splints that was tailor made for a client that paved the way for a reasonably satisfactory return of functions. Abstract: A 28 years old female, working as an anatomist met with a railway accident leading to bilateral upper limb multiple injuries such as fractures, muscle tear, tendon injuries, skin loss, finger amputation in her bilateral upper extremity. Thereafter, she underwent series of surgeries and was referred for Occupational Therapy services soon after that. Besides undergoing various rehabilitation regimes she was administered with a series of 22 splints in a span of 7 months. These splints were made out of low temperature thermoplastic, aluminum, soft leather and cotton tape and were given to the client for various purposes at different phases. Results: Splints contributed effectively in client s early return to her ADL and )ADL tasks such as brushing, eating, combing, holding handbags, operating her cabin door, serving meals, cleaning bathroom etc. Most importantly, it facilitated her return to work, i.e. cadaver dissection and black board teaching to her students. Conclusion: Series of splints given to the client had a significant role to play in her early recovery leading to her meaningful return to work. Keywords: serial splinting, bilateral upper limb trauma.
  34. 34. Corresponding Author’s Email id: dr.atishree@gmail.com O4 Title: A Study on Influence of Hand Anthropometry on Grip Strength in Geriatric Population Authors: Kunal Sanjay Dhamne1, Dr. Tushar J. Palekar2 Designation: MPT student in MSK and Hand Conditions1, Professor and Principal2 Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune Background: Hand grip strength (HGS) is an important test to evaluate hand functions and is physiological variable that is affected by a number of factors including age, gender, body size hand length, hand width and posture. There is good evidence that HGS is a strong indicator of health status, based on the incidence of disability, morbidity, and mortality in adult population. Hand anthropometry involves various factors like finger span, finger length, perimeters of hand, hand circumference. As the age increases grip strength tend to decrease due to various factors including weak hand muscles. Objectives: 1] To examine the anthropometry of the hand of study samples 2] To examine the grip strength of study samples 3] To find the co-relation between hand anthropometry and grip strength Method: Subject fulfilling the inclusion criteria will be taken into the study after getting an informed written consent. All the participants will be evaluated for grip strength using Jamar hand dynamometer. Subjects having same grip strength will be kept under same group. Detailed hand anthropometric examination will be taken for all the subjects. Hand muscle strengthening protocol for two weeks, will be administered. After the completion of strengthening protocol, subjects will be re-assessed for grip strength. Data will be analyzed statistically. Results and Conclusion: Awaited. It will be presented at the conference. Keywords: grip strength, hand anthropometry. Corresponding Author’s Email id: kunalsd789@gmail.com O5 Title: Scapular Dysfunction in Guitar Players Authors: Nidhi Atulkumar Shah1, Dr. Apurv Shimpi2 Designation: MPT student1, Associate Professor2 Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune 1, Sancheti Institute College of Physiotherapy, Pune 2 Background: Playing guitar can lead to asymmetric postures and can affect shoulder stability. Objective: To assess presence of scapular dysfunction in professional guitar players.
  35. 35. Method: Lateral scapular slide test was performed at the spine of scapula and inferior angle in 20 professional guitar players (18-40 years) compared with 20 age matched non-players at 0°, 45° and 90°of shoulder with both limbs loaded with ½ kg weight measured with vernier caliper . Analysis was done by unpaired t test. Results: Scapular dysfunction in guitar players was seen in the form of asymmetric scapula at rest in 25% players and dyskinetic scapula in 20% players. 100% of non-players had normal scapula. Comparison at the level of spine of scapula showed no significant difference (p>0.05) but, at the inferior angle showed a significant difference at 0° (1.37cm), 45° (1.93cm) and 90° (2.15cm) which was more in the players (p<0.05). Conclusion: There exists dysfunction of scapular stabilizers in professional guitar players at level of inferior angle Keywords: guitar players, asymmetry, dyskinesia, dominant shoulder Corresponding Author’s Email id: nidhi8_shah@rediffmail.com O6 Title: Post Traumatic Stiffness of Hand: Comparative Study of Home Exercises Program and Personal Manual Exercises Program Author: Dr. Pawan Shirsath1, Dr. Ganesh Pande2 Designation: Physiotherapist1 Head of Rehabilitation Unit2 Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, B. J. Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune Corresponding Author’s Email id: pawanshirsath@yahoo.co.in Aim: To compare the effectiveness of home exercise program versus personal manual exercises in post traumatic hand stiffness. Method: 20 patients with diagnosed post traumatic hand stiffness were selected from age group of 50 to 65. The comparison is done on the basis of strength and range of motion with appropriate outcome measures. Results: The patients from mentioned age group treated with personal manual exercises showed significant improvement than the group treated on home exercises program. Corresponding Author’s Email id: pawanshirsath@yahoo.co.in O7 Title: Screening of Performance Related Upper Limb Injuries Experienced by Indian Musicians. Authors: Dr. Ajay Malshikare1, Dr. Tushar Palekar2 Designation: MPT1 (Hand), Asst. Prof1, Professor & Principal2 Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune.
  36. 36. Aim: To screen for performance related upper limb injuries experienced by Indian Musicians. Objective: To screen performance related upper limb injuries experienced by Guitar, Sitar, Keyboard, Harmonium, and Tabla Players. Methodology: 100 Musicians from age group of 20-60 years, who fulfill inclusion criteria, were invited to participate in this survey. Every musician was given a questionnaire to fill as per their experience about performance related symptoms and problem faced in past or present in upper limb. Results: 66 Musicians out of 100 were having some or the other, performance related symptom or problem experienced in upper limb. Conclusion: This study proves that, musical instrumentalist who participated in this study (100 Musicians) are experiencing performance related upper limb injuries (66%). Symptoms such as significant pain in musculoskeletal system, abnormal sensation were noticed in finger tips, weakness in muscles and loss of sensation in fingers. Keywords: musicians, upper limb injury Corresponding Author’s Email id: ajaymalu29@gmail.com O8 Title: Establishing normative data for upper extremity weight bearing capability in adults Authors: Pooja M. Ganacharya1, Dr. Tushar Palekar2 Designation: MPT 2 Student1, Professor & Principal2 Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune. Aim: Establishing normative data for upper extremity weight bearing capability in adults Objective: To Establish normative data for upper extremity weight bearing capability in adults using a push off test. Methodology: 200 Normal individuals from age group of 20-40 years, who fulfill inclusion criteria, were invited to participate in this survey. Every individual was asked to weight bear maximally through a dynamometer that was positioned according to the push off test, 3 readings were taken out of which best was considered to be their true reading. This test was performed on both dominant and non-dominant hand. Results: Sample collection in progress. To be presented at conference. Keywords: weight bearing, push-off test Corresponding Author’s Email id: poojaganacharya29@gmail.com
  37. 37. O9 Title: Immediate Effect of Muscle energy technique on Gird in professional cricket bowlers: A Randomized Controlled Trial Authors: Antariksha A Suryavanshi1, Dr. Venus Pagare2, Dr. Tushar Pakekar3 Designation: MPT 2 Student1, Professor2, Professor & Principal3 Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune. Aim: To find the immediate effectiveness of Muscle Energy Technique (MET) on internal rotation range of motion in cricket bowlers with GIRD and compare it with that of control group. Methodology: Inclusion criteria for the study was age 18 to 30 years, true GIRD > 10 degrees and cricketers involved in competitive cricket. 30 fast bowlers with GIRD >10° were randomly allocated to either MET or control group. MET was directed towards the gleno-humeral abductors and internal rotators (IR) and external rotators (ER) range of motion (ROM) were measured using universal goniometer before and immediately after 3 repetitions of MET. No treatment was given to the control group and measurements were taken after 5 minutes of rest. Result: MET group showed greater improvement in IR ROM immediately following application of MET as compared to the control group. Conclusion: MET directed towards GHJ abductors can improve internal rotation ROM in cricket bowlers with GIRD. This immediate increase in GHJ posterior shoulder ROM following MET can help in the prevention and treatment of shoulder injuries associated with pathologic GIRD and posterior shoulder tightness. Keywords: posterior shoulder tightness, sports, injury, flexibility, fast bowlers, Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit. Corresponding Author’s Email id: antarikshasuryawanshi@gmail.com O10 Title – A Comparative Study of Sustained Inferior Capsular Stretching Versus Passive Joint Mobilization in Treatment of Adhesive Capsulitis Authors: Swagata A. Patangankar1, Dr. Soumik Basu2, Dr. Tushar Palekar3 Designation: MPT 2 student1 , MPT musculoskeletal conditions and sports physiotherapy2, Professor & Principal3 Affiliation: Dr. D.Y. Patil College of physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune. Aim: To compare the effectiveness of sustained inferior capsular stretching versus passive joint mobilization in the treatment of Adhesive Capsulitis.
  38. 38. Methodology: 30 patients grade II Adhesive Capsulitis were randomly allocated to equal groups of 15 each to receive either sustained inferior capsular stretching or passive joint mobilization. The outcome measures used were goniometer measurements and VAS on day 1 and day 14 of treatment. Results: Still sample collection is going on, and will complete till this month end. Keywords: Adhesive capsulitis, passive joint mobilization, inferior capsular stretching Corresponding Author’s Email id: spatangankar525@gmail.com O11 Title: Comparative study on co-ordination ability among right and left handed individuals using Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test Authors: Dr. Anwar Gayasi1, Dr. Rashi Goel2, Dr. Tushar Palekar3 Designation: Student1, Associate Professor2, Principal3. Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Pimpri, Pune-18. Introduction: Co-ordination is the ability to execute smooth, accurate, controlled motor responses. The ability to produce these responses is dependent on somato-sensory, visual and vestibular input as well as a fully intact neuromuscular system from the motor cortex to the spinal cord. Eye hand co- ordination is a part of the mechanisms of performing everyday tasks; in its absence most people would be unable to carry out even the simplest of actions. So the present study is aimed to compare the co-ordination ability among right and left handed individuals using Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test. Methodology: The cross sectional study was done with a sample size of 30. Healthy normal individuals were selected conveniently based on the selection criteria (15 right handed and 15 left handed). Jebsen Taylor hand function test unit with all of its seven subsets was performed by each subject recruited. Result: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software version 16. Independent t-test was used to compare both the groups. The mean value of total time taken to perform the test was 40.94 seconds for right handed individuals and 45.31 seconds for the left handed individuals (p value= 0.023). After the total scores were analyzed, the individual seven items were compared. The mean values of the seven tasks showed that right handed individuals were better in all the tasks except one task i.e. stacking checkers. Unpaired t-tests for individual tasks were done and two tasks had significant p values i.e. task 1 (writing a short sentence p value = 0.04) and task 4 (simulated feeding p value = 0.022). Conclusion: There is a significant difference between the coordination ability among right and left handed individuals. After comparing the fine motor task, weighted and non-weighted functional task
  39. 39. among the right and left handed individuals, it was seen that there is a significant difference in the fine motor task but there was no significant difference in weighted and non-weighted functional task. Therefore, we propose right handed individuals to have a better coordination than left handed individuals which might prove useful for rehabilitation after an injury. Key words: Hand dominance, fine motor task, gross motor function. Corresponding Author’s Email id: gayasi.physio@gmail.com Poster Papers P1 Title: Effectiveness of Pain Release Phenomenon in De Quervain s Tenosynovitis: A Case Study Authors: Dr. Roopa Desai1, Dr. Tushar J. Palekar2 Designation: Assistant Professor1, Professor and Principal2 Affiliation: Dr. D.Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pimpri, Pune. Introduction: De Quervain s disease is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the thumb abductors at radiostyloid process. Various forms of physiotherapy may be used in the treatment of patients with De Quervain s Tenosynovitis including Cryotherapy, Ultrasound, iontophoresis, taping and exercises. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Pain Release Phenomenon (PRP) in a 39 year old male patient presenting with radial wrist pain of 6 weeks duration, diagnosed as De Quervain s Tenosynovitis on Right side. Poster Presentation
  40. 40. Clinical Features: The primary clinical feature was Wrist pain at radial styloid process on Right side. Patient also experienced thumb pain while writing, pinching and grasping .Difficulty in using wrist, hand and thumb especially ulnar deviation and thumb adduction, with VAS of 6 on activity. On examination, Finkelstein test was positive. Range of motion was painful and reduced at Wrist Extension and Radial Deviation. Intervention and Outcome Measure: The treatment approach consisted of Pain Release Phenomenon along with Ultrasound and Taping. The outcome measures included Visual Analog Scale and Quick DASH disability/symptom Score. Patient had 100% pain relief after 4 sessions of treatment. Conclusion: Pain Release Phenomenon appears to be a promising treatment for De Quervain s Tenosynovitis along with Ultrasound and Taping. Key Words: Radial wrist pain, Tenosynovitis, De Quervain s, Pain Release Phenomenon. Corresponding Author’s Email id: roopatubachi@rediffmail.com P2 Title: The Efficacy of Sensory Integration on Complex Hand Function like Hand Writing in Benign Hypotonia: A Case Series. Authors: Kanan Doshi1, MOT, Rucha Thorat2, MOT Designation: Occupational Therapist Affiliation: Lakshya Occupational Therapy Clinic, Ghatkopar, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India & Consultant at Shishu Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India1 Therapy for Kids, Pune, Maharashtra, India2 Abstract: This case series investigates the effects of sensory integration on complex hand functions in benign hypotonia. 3 case studies were used, children aged between 5- 10 years with no neuro pathological involvement, no sensory processing disorders. They were referred by school for hand writing issues like slow speed and illegibility. They were assessed on criteria for hypotonia, clinical observation and sensory profile, goal attainment scale was formed in consultation with parents. They underwent three months of sensory integration program along with occupational therapy intervention. At the end of three months they showed significant improvement in speed and legibility of hand writing. This case series implies that a complex hand function like hand writing can improve in benign hypotonia with sensory integration therapy. Corresponding Author’s Email id: kanandoshi@gmail.com
  41. 41. Mini Movies M1 Title: Low cost adaptive devices to improve functional ability of the bilateral upper limb deficient patient Presenter: Nayna Hatwar-Wanjari Designation: Occupational Therapist and In-charge of Occupational Therapy Department Affiliation: Sir J. J. Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Abstract: One of the most important problem for the bilateral above elbow amputee is inability to manage his basic ADL (Activities of daily leaving) independently. The mini movie is about a 32 yrs. Old, unmarried male patient, who is residing in a small village in Yawatmal district of Maharashtra. Patient was electrician by occupation. He met with train accident near Bhopal and emergency bilateral above elbow amputation was done on 29/4/15 at Bhopal medical college and then patient was referred to J. J. Hospital Mumbai on 5/5/15. Patient was referred to Occupational therapy department of J. J. Hospital on 14/5/15. When the patient came to occupational therapy dept. he was in a state of depression as it was life changing incident for him. He was the only earning member in his family. He was totally dependent on his mother for his ADL. Lot of motivation was done because in the rehabilitation of the high bilateral upper limb amputee, the success achieved is directly related Mini Movie Presentation
  42. 42. to the motivation. I have design and develop 3 adaptive devices for him and given training how to use the device. In the movie you can see how he is donning and doffing the adaptive device by himself also single device can be used for eating, brushing and writing purpose. He is completely managing brushing right from taking tooth paste to cleaning mouth. The second adaptive device was given to left side for glass holding, which is required during eating and brushing activity. Third adaptive device was for cleaning himself after defecation. The main features of adaptive device – 1) It can be given as early as possible post operatively.( In presence of wound also) 2) Patient is not dependent on others to wear the device 3) Low in cost 4) Light in weight 5) Help to reduce stump edema also 6) Help to improve quality of life 7) Help to improve functional ability in spite of limitation. 8) Help to gain patients confidence Mini movie shows patient has become functionally independent in basic ADL and his quality of life has improved. Corresponding Author’s Email id: nayna.wanjari@gmail.com M2 Title: Use of robotics in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation: ArmeoSpring Presenter: Dr. Charmie Dave Designation: Occupational Therapist Affiliation: Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, Andheri West, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Abstract: ArmeoSpring is an exoskeleton that uses arm weight support spring systems and augmented feedback to assist with self initiated, self directed, repetitive, functional, task oriented movements. Currently the most widely used arm and hand rehabilitation exoskeleton; it is based on research and development conducted under Prof. D. Reinkensmeyer at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) and at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC). It essentially comprises of two components: 1. The Arm Weight Support which is an ergonomic and adjustable exoskeleton with integrated springs. It embraces the whole arm, from shoulder to hand, and counterbalances the weight of the patient's arm, enhancing any residual function and neuromuscular control, and assisting active movement across a large 3D workspace. 2. Augmented Performance Feedback: The Armeo software contains an extensive library of game-like movement exercises supported by a
  43. 43. virtual-reality training environment that is both motivating and informative, clearly displaying the functional task along with immediate performance feedback. The motivating and self-initiated exercises include proximal and distal components, specifically related to grasp and release pro- / supination, wrist flexion / extension, reach and retrieval function. The equipment detects even trace amounts of movement and function and facilitates intensive reach and grasp exercises at an early stage of therapy. Assessment tools: Besides functional exercises, the system contains exercises specifically designed to assess the motor ability and coordination of patients. Built-in sensors record the active arm movement at each joint during all therapy sessions and the performance data is stored in the computer, where it can be used to assess and document the patient s progress, to determine the next appropriate challenge and to promote the optimum therapy and best possible outcomes. The Armeo software supplies accurate assessments through the options A-MOVE, A-GOAL and A-ROM. Taking into account the contraindications and every patient s individual profile, indications for the use of the ArmeoSpring are Stroke, Multiple sclerosis (MS), Cerebral palsy (CP), Recovery from neurosurgical interventions, Spinal cord injuries (SCI), Traumatic brain injury (TBI), Endoprosthesis; follow-up care for elbow and shoulder endoprosthesis, Muscle diseases, Hemiplegia, Parkinson s disease and other movement disorders, Upper limb ataxia, Neuropathies e.g. Guillain- Barré syndrome). ArmeoSpring is currently being used at Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, Andheri (W), Mumbai as an adjunct to conventional Therapy. Corresponding Author’s Email id: charmiedave@gmail.com
  44. 44. Essays E1 Title: Practice of Hand Therapy: Indian Vs. Global Scenario Author: Dr. Rashi Goel Designation: Assistant Professor Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, Maharashtra, India One hand I extend into myself, the other towards others. The practice of hand therapy has grown exponentially over the past nearly 40 years ago, owing to its roots which originated during the Vietnam war; when Dr. James Hunter recognized the vital importance of bringing hand surgeons and occupational and physical therapists together in the same facility, working as a team to achieve the best possible outcomes for the patients. The hand surgery and therapy have become such areas of specialization comes to no surprise when one considers the extent to which the hand is represented within the homunculus. A/c to Society for Hand Therapy, India; Hand therapists are certified or licensed occupational therapists or physical therapists, who through advanced continuing education, clinical experience and independent study have become proficient in the treatment of pathological upper-quarter conditions resulting from trauma, disease, or congenital or acquired deformity. Hand therapists use a problem- solving method to develop treatment programs & patients receive treatments tailored to their needs. The ultimate objective of rehabilitation is for patients to return to full independence, managing their former occupations and hobbies wherever possible. To achieve this, everyone including patients must have a clear understanding of the aims and importance of hand rehabilitation. A/c to American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Hand Therapy provides treatments without an operation, help with recent or long-lasting pain, help to reduce sensitivity from nerve problems, learning to feel again after a nerve injury, learning home exercise programs to help with movement
  45. 45. and strength, how to make splints to help prevent or improve stiffness, learning to complete everyday activities with special tools and help getting back to work. If surgery is needed, hand therapists can provide assistance with helping wounds heal, preventing infection, scar management and reducing swelling. Practice of Hand Therapy has undergone tremendous changes since its beginning. The use of horse hairs for determining coetaneous sensation by Von Frey in 1895 has reformed into Semmes Weinstein Monofilament Testing today. A study done in Isreal in 2013 had emphasized over computer-based rehabilitation, the tele- rehabilitation. In India, there is an emerging field of video based gaming rehabilitation based on virtual reality for upper limb rehabilitation following stroke. There is definitely an added benefit but the therapist s skills do affect some of the measurements. )t is not, however, superior to traditional treatment and cannot replace the therapist. Indian scenario is quite different from across the world when it comes to the curriculum of Hand Therapy. Only some universities offer a post- graduate degree in hand rehabilitation. This is open for both occupational and physical therapist after completing graduation in their respective fields. These individuals can be called (and Therapists in )ndia. Further, only some universities incorporate hand splinting, POP making, in their masters curriculum lacking universality. In India, Hand therapists are still unaware of their momentousness in this field. This is because of lack of recognition for their work. Most of the referring physicians are often not open to discussions with their therapists as we ourselves are dependent on the surgeons for dictating us when to start mobilization especially when the cases deal with flexor and/or extensor tendon repairs. I myself have witnessed the same. Many a times, we ourselves are unaware of the surgical techniques used in a particular surgery and have to obey the rules set by the hand surgeon. Now a days, if a surgeon does not acknowledge the vital role of the therapist in the overall management of patients with disorders of the hand, he would be called a short- sighted surgeon. The scenario outside India is totally different. Let us take an example of Zion Harvey, the 8 years old boy on whom world s first bilateral hand transplant was performed at the Children s (ospital of Philadelphia, few months back. This extraordinary accomplishment was possible with the combined efforts of world-class abilities of the physicians, nurses, therapists and other staff. Post surgery, he had spent a week in C(OP s Pediatric )ntensive Care Unit, then he was moved to a medical unit and eventually moved to an inpatient rehabilitation unit where he underwent rigorous hand therapy several times a day and is still undergoing. In India, it is easy to do clinical research but there is a big lacuna in this area. No doubt, there is abundance of patients; nevertheless, the reasons for limited research are the lack of time constraints
  46. 46. because of greater number of patients then the available expertise, lack of funding, insufficient documentation, etc. Moreover the independent working therapists often lack in their knowledge updation through upcoming journals as these are not readily available for consultation. This is, however, not the case with academic institutions as they have yearly subscriptions to various journals but they ultimately lack in specialization in this field due to which this vital resource remains unused. At the assessment level, )ndian scenario involves the use of SWMT for sensory evaluation, oxford s manual muscle testing, Jamar dynamometer, pinch meter for motor function, various norm and criterion referenced tests as Jebson Taylor for hand function, 9 hole peg test for coordination, DASH for functional evaluation; to name a few. In US, new techniques of objective evaluation are also at our disposal that includes video recording, electrogoniometers, optoelectronic and electromagnetic trackers, and instrumented gloves for kinematic evaluation, dynamometers, including isokinetic and isometric devices, work simulators, refined techniques of evaluation of dexterity and finger coordination, of measurement of tactile and thermal discrimination, and so on. These systems can be enhanced by way of visual feedback. All these need to be incorporated in an Indian setup for a better evaluation of every patient undergoing hand therapy. A/c to Journal of Hand Therapy, 2004; hand therapists can adopt an Evidence Based Practice Approach but must be prepared to deal with the challenge of uncertainty when evidence is lacking. This evidence is a grave need of the hour. Human hand is a multifaceted tool; therefore it is not surprising that treating its dysfunction is a complicated and often daunting topic. Due to its enormous capacity for motion, opportunity for injury and disease plus its psychological value, the restoration of dexterity and function pose one of the greatest challenges in its rehabilitation. Many leaders in hand therapy - MacDermid, Jansen, Valdes, Szabo, LaStayo to name a few have eloquently described the vision and process of evidence-based decisions for hand therapists in various articles over the past decade. Study done on 600 Certified hand Therapists in 2013 in Madison, USA, concluded that clinical decisions made by CHTs are not the simple combination of specific values on two dimensions, but rather, CHTs are dynamic information processors with personal experiences and beliefs that lead to a unique cognitive and behavioral signature. Despite the imperative for evidence-based decisions, many healthcare professionals, including hand therapists, do not use research findings for clinical decisions at an optimal level. In my view, hand therapists need to move away from opinion or set protocols towards evidence based treatment guidelines. We do have ample opportunities to discuss among other therapists, orthotics and prosthetics regarding the rehabilitation. And we have many journals namely Hand
  47. 47. Clinics, Journal of Hand Surgery, Journal of Hand Therapy, social sites focusing on hand therapy, etc. However, the value of treatment guidelines must be tested, not assumed, regardless of the development process. The ultimate aim of hand therapy is to apply sound clinical reasoning to determine the needs of their clients with upper extremity problems. Good clinical reasoning skills are required in order for hand therapists to move beyond therapy protocols, to think critically about their clients needs & to provide safe and creative treatment. Clinical Reasoning allows therapists to treat their clients as unique people with individual needs while applying appropriate & safe treatment. A/c to a recent exploratory study done on 249 hand therapists in New York USA, the ICF component of participation in the provision of hand care was evaluated. They said that a gap in current knowledge exists regarding how therapists evaluate patient difficulty participating in life situations. In the end, hand therapy would be more successful if we understand our inseparable role in rehabilitation. )t s rightly said, God helps those who help themselves . We should not only accept the challenges but also stay ahead of them. To achieve that, we need to amalgamate our sound knowledge base of complex anatomy and biomechanics of hand and related structures, clinical experience gained through the years combined with regular meetings, seminars, Continuing Medical Education Programs, etc. We have the ability to change, evolve and be exceptional. We should be willing to explore new ways to recruit, teach, start educational programs, and support hand therapy for its development. We cannot alter the past, but the future is very much in our hands. Corresponding Author’s Email id: rashigoelphysio@gmail.com E2 Title: Practice of Hand Therapy: Indian Vs. Global Scenario Author: Dr. Jyotsna Gaikwad Designation: Occupational Therapist Affiliation: LTMMC & LTMG Hospital, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Few months back, a patient from rural area, case of one month old right mutilated hand injury; laborer by occupation was referred to our department. He was very depressed and had left hope regarding use of his right hand ever. We counseled him and provided him with best therapy exercises and splints and to his belief; it was a miracle in his life as he could use his right hand as before. At same instance, we had one more case of right thumb amputation in a patient, student by occupation for rehabilitation. He needed prosthesis for his hand to perform fine motor activities but he could not afford the cost of it, so we fabricated thumb prosthesis with help of orfit material and he could overcome difficulties in fine motor tasks with prosthesis on. Since then questions are bothering
  48. 48. my mind that why is practice of hand therapy so limited and why can t people in rural reach our services and afford it? History states that India has been the pioneer in the field of hand therapy. Dr. Paul Brand worked with leprosy patients and his work led to development of hand surgery and hand therapy, but this was 50years back. Dr. Sterling Bunnell started setup in Army hospitals in U.S. which focused on upper limb injuries. As war ended, surgeons formed ASSH and then later ASHT was formed. Hand therapy is still in developing stage in India and reverse is the scenario globally. In India, 50 years back, there was no awareness of hand therapy among people as well as professionals and neither the scope of practice. People did not know importance of work, after hand injuries they use to just depend on others for the same. Rural areas didn t have information about disabilities and its effect on patient s life and this led to hopelessness and thus no access to Community Rehabilitation. But after so many years hand therapy is developing, we are getting referrals from other professionals; we have proper Rehabilitation team and conduct clinics to assess the progress of patients. Other countries offer client centered services that enable people to engage in occupations of life. They conduct awareness programs regarding disabilities and how to overcome them, publish journals and magazines and injury prevention programs that help people and other professionals to understand the importance of hand therapy. Also they provide Tele-rehabilitation and internet access to patients to solve their queries. With the help of electronic media and global information exchange we can access the therapy interventions and protocols and help in development of hand therapy. IFSHT, the practice of Hand Therapy, lists clinics that are open to hosting visitors, lists organizations that offer hand therapy volunteer opportunities, lists Hand Therapy relevant websites and much more. IFSHT also contributes articles about Hand Therapy to the IFSSH E-zine, which is an open- access publication. The IFSHT Update contains information about Hand Therapy and upcoming meetings worldwide and is published four times a year in Hand Therapy journals as well as on the IFSHT website. IFSHT also offers a Hand Therapy connections e-newsletter, which may be subscribed to via the IFSHT website. Similarly in India, our experienced hand therapists have formed the Indian Society of hand therapists {ISHT} which performs for the betterment of hand therapy in India by hosting conferences, conducting research studies and presentations of budding hand therapists. ISHT also works in collaboration with Hand surgeons Association which is obviously to improve quality care of patients. Abroad, Hand Rehabilitation costs are covered under Mediclaim policies and thus people afford to seek services related to super specialist professionals. But in India, hand therapy is institutional
  49. 49. based due to the escalating cost of healthcare and people don t opt for skilled professionals due to economic constraints and shortfalls in service provision. Here, in Rajiv Gandhi yojana only lower extremity prosthesis is covered, we need to work on this as we know hands are equally important for the patients. So we should try our level best to include upper extremity splints and prosthesis under mediclaim policies which will help the poor to have access to best possible services. In developed countries, various certification courses, masters courses, diploma courses , distance learning courses , prosthetic hand and robotic hand, advances in splinting are provided that helps in better education, updating the knowledge and training of hand therapist. Recently, in India, ISHT has also started certification exams in hand therapy to give best hand therapists. Our therapists are working very hard to meet the global scenario and with their enthusiasm and dedicated services we will meet the horizons of hand therapy. Ergonomic education and its implementation is very important in other countries .Therapists are involved in Industrial Rehabilitation as well as they tackle the issues that affect the human occupations and deal with primary healthcare, its promotion and prevention. In India also we have started focusing on ergonomic education to prevent cumulative trauma disorders and accidental injuries as here majority of injuries are due to this conditions. Thus we should aim at providing educational programs regarding the same in industries to prevent accidents and cumulative trauma disorders. We in India also have to focus more on the documentation as it will help us to know effective progress of the patient. It is thus of prime importance globally. I would like to end with one more experience that I came across while working in hand therapy unit. I had a female patient; she wanted to improve her hand functions and range of motion after burns just because she had to put mehendi on her hands for her marriage. It really sounded very touchy to me and with all possible therapy, splints and information from electronic media we were able to complete her wish. Thus from this we can say that we take patient s psychological, social as well as cultural view into consideration while treating the patients. Thus hand therapist deals with overall function of the patient Thus with the help of electronic media, internet , search engines we can seek the information regarding the progress of hand therapy globally and we can implement it in India for improving the quality care to patients and improve our professional standards. Also we can share our knowledge and new technologies with other countries for the betterment of patients. Thus, the future of India lies in being proactive in relation to global and local trends. Corresponding Author’s Email id: gaikwad.jyotsna@gmail.com
  50. 50. E3: Title: Practice Of Hand Therapy: Indian Vs. Global Scenario Author: Dr. Amita Aggarwal Designation: Assistant Professor Affiliation: Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, Maharashtra, India Hand therapy is defined as the art and science of rehabilitation of the upper limb which includes the hand, wrist, elbow & shoulder girdle. The Physiotherapists are involved with the management of hand injuries along with Occupational therapists in the Indian setting. Physiotherapists are working specifically to increase the range & strength after figuring out the restricting structure affecting function while Occupational therapists are involved with the simulating the functional tasks involved in clients working environment and utilizing everyday items in play to ease hand therapy of pediatric patients. Looking across the world, IFSHT (International Federation of Societies for Hand Therapy) has most of the qualified hand therapists as occupational therapists. The most extreme examples of this are Turkey where only physiotherapists specialize and Denmark where 99 percent of hand therapists are occupational therapists. The origin of hand therapy in India was as early as civilizations whose sculptures hand gestures predict various mudras. Same are used in yogasanas, Natya Shastra and Asian martial arts. In respect to the global scenario, it is the US government that played a foremost role in the development of hand rehabilitation especially after world war when the soldiers were affected in greater part. It was an impulse for development of upper extremity functional assessment and dynamic splintage (Melvin 1985) Most of the traumatic hand injuries like crush hand injury, mallet finger, tendon injuries are managed surgically. Following a surgical intervention many surgeon's dictates the treatment to be given while others allow independent intervention by the hand therapists. This trend varies as many experienced surgeons understand the importance of hand therapy and refer patients within correct time while others underestimate or lack awareness in the field of hand therapy. Myriad evidence supports the concept that early controlled motion is beneficial to both tendon healing and the accretion of strength while also decreasing adhesions and work of flexion. So the decisions for postoperative rehabilitation are generally made in conjunction with the surgeon. In Indian scenario interventions when done independently by the physical therapist and Occupational therapists involve using given protocols or experience based treatments based on an
  51. 51. assessment. Discontinuation of the protective orthosis and return to function is based upon adherence and response to the treatment of patients. Various other conditions generally referred directly to hand therapists include patients with post-fracture stiffness, CMC joint osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid arthritis, spastic hand in Cerebral palsy etc. Globally most studies reviewed in 1930 explicates that to manage most of the hand injuries, surgical intervention was done immediately while in the 1950s improved surgical and orthotic options including moldable plastics, therapeutic aids increased a demand for hand therapy. In 1970 conservative treatment was redefined with a consensus that in the absence of large articular surface disruption or subluxation, non-operative treatment will be favored. In respect to immobilization using splints, earlier at least 4 to 6 weeks immobilization was agreed upon. But more recent publications include high percentages of good and excellent results using early motion keeping an account of age and health in mind. Hand therapists are responsible for care that client receives using occupation and ADL based assessment. An assistant aids in goal setting and contributing ideas to clients program. In some state, therapy assistant needs a license to practice. Based on a vision of hand therapists, professionals in India found less training sessions scheduled for up-gradation. These findings were in accordance to the primary healthcare scenario in India (Devdas and Elias, 2008). Also, some reported that the hand therapy certification programs running are less. Professionals after graduation are confused for post-graduation in hand compared to sports or pediatric therapy. This trend is running because of lack of awareness of scope and practice in hand as specialists. To widen up learning in hand, Hand therapy skill courses are best sources. Since the establishment of Indian society of hand therapy in 2009 various initiatives have been taken to organize workshops, conferences and courses specifically addressing upper extremity rehabilitation approach. Newsletters, recent advances all add to it. This calls up to create an awareness among professionals along with patients about the importance of this field along with various new equipment s and splints specifically designed to improve upper limb rehabilitation In accordance to various countries hand therapy associations were established in the 1980s. Australian hand therapy association came into existence in 1982. In 1997, Argentina and Belgium decided to constitute the South American society of Hand Therapist in a framework of VI Congress of South American Federation for Surgery of Hand (FSCM), Argentina. Various societies have formed to coordinate activities of hand surgery and rehabilitation societies around the world. Another non- profitable organization like ISSPORTH (International society for sports traumatology of hand)
  52. 52. educates athletes, trainer and physician alike about gradations of athletic hand and wrist injuries. So hand therapists have a wider scope for practice. There is even need of professional competency standards in hand therapy. Globally practice settings and health care systems for hand therapists varies. In general, hand therapists work in hospitals, Rehabilitation centers and private institutes while many are directly involved with home services. To maintain high standards in the practice of hand therapy and to achieve an advanced level of professional knowledge HTCC (Hand Therapy Certification) envisioned a two-step process of certification and re-certification. This encourages participation in continuing education and professional development initiative. Therapist licensed or certified Occupational therapists or Physiotherapists residing in US or Canada, who had a minimum of 5 years of clinical experience, including 2000 hours or more in direct practice in hand therapy can appear for the examination. In India by 2013 certification examination in hand therapy was announced by Indian society for Hand Therapy. The IFFSH conference (Combined International Congress of Hand Therapists and Hand Surgeons held in New Delhi, March 2013) made an impact among the ISSH (Indian society for surgery of hand) hand surgeons to make a separate society for Hand Therapist. Complete acknowledgment to IFSHT and the International Federation for Surgeons as well who realized the importance of both disciplines coexisting and that is why today there is an initiative on the part of the surgeons also to recognize hand therapy practice. The present scenario calls up for more research within the field of hand therapy and to spread information about hand therapy practice across different countries. Currently clinical practice within the specialty of hand therapy differs widely throughout the world. Introduction of competency standards, thorough and comprehensive knowledge will further strengthen professional formalized education programs. Corresponding Author’s Email id: amita.goyal@dpu.edu.in
  53. 53. Expert Opinion One Liners
  • AtulDwivedi

    Sep. 19, 2018

Souvenir of 4th Annual National Conference of Society for Hand Therapy (SHT), India. 12th & 13th December, 2015 at Pune

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