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VTA North County Open House Presentation April 2014

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More info: http://bit.ly/1lEOxm9. This presentation provides an overview of VTA's active and planned projects in the North County, presented at an April 9, 2014 open house in Mountain View. The projects covered include the Light Rail Efficiency Program, El Camino Real Bus Rapid Transit, Silicon Valley Express Lanes, and a study to improve bus service in the area. All the projects are located in or affect Mountain View, Palo Alto, Sunnyvale and surrounding communities.

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VTA North County Open House Presentation April 2014

  1. 1. Light Rail Efficiency Project Mountain View Double Track Project Mountain View Local Projects Open House
  2. 2. 2 2017 Service Plan
  3. 3. 3 Mountain View Double Track Project Phase I: Adds a second main line LRT track (approximately 1,400) feet between Mountain View Transit Center and State Route 85 Caltrain Realignment: Shifts existing Caltrain track to create space for second light rail track Phase II: Extends second main line LRT track over a distance of approximately 3,000 feet from State Route 85 to Whisman LRT Station
  4. 4. 4 Why Are We Doing the Project? Double Track will allow VTA to: • Introduce new service from Mountain View to Alum Rock • Increase connectivity with Caltrain and the future Milpitas BART station • Serve growing residential and commercial development • Respond to demand at Levi’s Stadium • Improve system-wide on-time performance, reduce train bunching
  5. 5. 5 Mountain View Double Track – Phase I Phase I: Construction will occur between mid 2014 to mid 2015. No major impacts to service will occur during this period.
  6. 6. 6 Caltrain Realignment Caltrain Realignment: Existing Caltrain Tracks will need to be realigned between Evelyn Station and Highway 237. Construction will occur between mid 2014 to late 2014.
  7. 7. 7 Mountain View Double Track – Phase II Phase I: Construction will occur between early 2015 to late 2015. Will require Closure of Evelyn Station.
  8. 8. 8 Evelyn Station Closure Evelyn is located where second light rail track will be constructed Discontinuation of service will begin January 2015 Average Daily Weekday Boardings: 66 (2nd lowest of 59 stations)
  9. 9. EL CAMINO REAL BUS RAPID TRANSIT Would upgrade the current 522 Rapid Bus to BRT status by making changes to El Camino Real and The Alameda that make transit FAST, FREQUENT AND RELIABLE and make WALKING and BICYCLING along the corridor SAFER.
  10. 10. Making Stops Faster BRT stations would function like light rail stations, allowing passengers to purchase fares or tap Clipper Cards at stations and board through all three doors. Increasing Transit Travel Speeds In some parts of the corridor, a general use lane could be converted into a bus-only lane, allowing the BRT to bypass traffic. Transit signal priority would allow an approaching BRT bus to hold a green light. EL CAMINO REAL BUS RAPID TRANSIT
  11. 11. Making Bicycling and Walking Safer El Camino Real is designed for cars and can be a scary and dangerous place to bicycle or walk. Many bicycle and pedestrian collisions occur each year and some are fatal. In parts of the corridor with bus-only lanes, bicycle lanes could be installed (if the city approves). Crossing distances would be shortened and new intersections, signals and crosswalks can be added to make El Camino Real less of a barrier between neighborhoods. Median BRT stations would act as pedestrian refuges. EL CAMINO REAL BUS RAPID TRANSIT
  12. 12. How Bus-Only Lanes Work In some parts of the corridor, the bus-only lane would be in the center of the street, adjacent to the median. BRT stations would be in the middle of the street. The eastbound and westbound stations would be on opposite sides of the intersection . Bus-Only Lanes WB BRT Station EL CAMINO REAL BUS RAPID TRANSIT
  13. 13. How Bulbout Stations Work In parts of the corridor with bulbout stations, the curb would be extended out to the travel lane. The BRT would stop in the travel lane while passengers board—approximately a 20-second duration. BRT stops in lane Bulbout BRT Station EL CAMINO REAL BUS RAPID TRANSIT
  14. 14. Project Alternatives and Environmental Analysis Seven project alternatives—ranging from doing nothing to building 14 miles of bus-only lanes—are currently being studied by VTA. A Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR), which analyzes the impact that the project will have across 17 categories will be released in late Summer, 2014. VTA’s Board of Directors will choose a locally preferred alternative after the public comment period for the DEIR. EL CAMINO REAL BUS RAPID TRANSIT
  15. 15. Public Outreach and City Coordination 2010 to presentMonthly meetings with city staff Summer, 2011 City Council, committee presentations Fall, 2011 Open House community meetings Spring , 2012 City Council, committee presentations Fall, 2012 VTA Board of Directors workshop, mtg. February, 2013 Environmental Scoping meetings EL CAMINO REAL BUS RAPID TRANSIT
  16. 16. Silicon Valley Express Lanes City of Mountain View Open House Council Meeting April 9, 2014
  17. 17. What are Express Lanes? • Express Lanes are converted carpool lanes that offer solo drivers the opportunity to use carpool lanes for a fee. 17
  18. 18. Why are Express Lanes being developed? • To provide congestion relief through more effective use of existing roadways (e.g., use of existing carpool lanes) • To provide commuters with a new mobility option • To provide a new source of funding for transportation improvements including public transit 18
  19. 19. Who can use Express Lanes? • SOLO DRIVERS can use Express Lanes for a fee. • CARPOOL USERS Eligible vehicles with two or more people per car (in addition to transit and motorcycles) travel in Express Lanes FREE of charge. 19
  20. 20. Why drivers use Express Lanes • Drivers choose to use Express Lanes for a variety of reasons at different times, but the most reported reasons are: • Time Savings • Ease of Commute • Convenience 20
  21. 21. FasTrak 21 NO TOLL BOOTHS FEES AUTOMATICALLY DEDUCTED FROM ACCOUNT FASTRAK TRANSPONDER ATTACHES TO WINDSHIELD
  22. 22. How Much Do Solo Drivers Pay? • Range of cost on SR 237 has been between $0.30 and $4.75, with an average toll less than $2.00 • Pricing changes as the number of drivers increases and decreases to ensure a free flow of traffic • When more cars are on the roadway, the price to enter express lanes is higher. When there are fewer cars driving, the cost is lower 22
  23. 23. Digital Signage and Pricing 23
  24. 24. How Do I Pay? • Step 1: Visit bayareafastrak.org to learn about FasTrak • Step 2: Purchase a toll tag through FasTrak or at retail locations • Step 3: Register your new toll tag immediately to a new or existing FasTrak account online or by phone at (877) 229-8655. • Step 4: After you have completed the registration process, mount toll tag in your vehicle and begin enjoying the benefits of FasTrak. 24
  25. 25. How Are Toll Revenues Used? • Operations, maintenance and enforcement • Revenue to stay within corridor • Any remaining revenues to be used for transportation improvements including transit 25
  26. 26. Where /When Can I Use Express Lanes? • SR 237 Express Lanes • Phase 1 (in operation March 2012) • Phase 2 (2016 pending funding) • SR 85 Express Lanes - 2017 pending funding • US 101 Express Lanes - 2017 pending funding 26
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  28. 28. SR 237 Express Lanes Data • Up to 10,000 solo drivers use the SR 237 Express Lanes each week • Solo drivers have saved up to 20 minutes • Drivers in the general purpose lanes are saving up to seven (7) minutes 28
  29. 29. SR 237 Express Lanes – Phase 2 • Project Description • 1-lane Express Lane (convert 1-lane HOV lane from existing Phase 1 terminus to approximately Mathilda Ave.) • Project length: 4 miles • Environmental Clearance • Summer 2014 • Project Opening • Targeting 2016, funding dependent 29
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  32. 32. SR 85 Express Lanes • Project Description • 1-lane Express Lanes (convert 1-lane HOV lane from US 101 interchange in San Jose to US 101 interchange in Mountain View) • 2-lane Express Lanes (add another lane between the SR87 and I-280 interchanges) • Project length: 24 miles • Environmental Clearance • Circulation December 2013 • Approval Fall 2014 • Project Opening • Targeting 2017, funding dependent 32
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  34. 34. US 101 Express Lanes • Project Description • 1-lane Express Lanes (convert 1-lane HOV lane from Cochrane Rd. in Morgan Hill to SR85 interchange in Mountain View) • 2-lane Express Lanes (add a new lane between Dunne Ave. and SR85 interchange in San Jose, between Blossom Hill Road and Mathilda Dr. in Sunnyvale; and convert 2- lane HOV lanes from SR85 interchange in Mtn View to the county line in Palo Alto) • Project length: 36 miles • Environmental Clearance - Fall 2014 • Project Opening - Targeting 2017, funding dependent 34
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  36. 36. NORTH CENTRAL COUNTY BUS IMPROVEMENT PLAN PURPOSE The planned Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) services on El Camino Real and Stevens Creek may change travel demand on local bus routes that cross these corridors. Additionally, the cities in this area (Mountain View, Sunnyvale, Santa Clara and Cupertino) are intensifying land uses in areas that are not easily accessible by BRT so it may be necessary to make changes to local bus service to meet a changing rider demand. The Plan will make recommendations that will flow into VTA’s scheduled service adjustment process. GOALS Improve connectivity of local routes with the BRT routes Explore whether new service types or new routes are needed Improve overall transit service in the study area while being cost effective Collect input from the communities in the study area
  37. 37. NORTH CENTRAL COUNTY BUS IMPROVEMENT PLANSTUDY AREA
  38. 38. NORTH CENTRAL COUNTY BUS IMPROVEMENT PLAN SCHEDULE 2014 April Existing Conditions Analysis May Development of Draft Recommendations June Review Draft Recommendations with City Staff July Community and City Council Meetings August Final Recommendations released 2015 VTA’s Biennial Service Changes 2018 Service Changes relating to opening of BRT routes
  39. 39. Rider Surveys New Bus Stop Designs Easy To Work With TRANSIT PASSENGER ENVIRONMENT PLAN Prioritizing Improvements Stop Percentiles RidershipPercentages Most of VTA’s bus riders come from a small percentage of stops. 21% of bus riders come from the top 1% of bus stops. 50% of bus riders come from 5% of bus stops. That tells us we need to prioritize improvements to high-ridership stops to ensure the maximum rider benefit per dollar spent.
  40. 40. Prioritizing Improvements New Bus Stop Designs Easy To Work With TRANSIT PASSENGER ENVIRONMENT PLAN Rider Surveys In the past, decisions about how to improve bus stops were made with good intentions, but not with data regarding which bus stop amenities riders value most. VTA surveyed riders in the summer of 2013 and found that transit information is the most desired amenity, followed by shelter and seating. This information will inform which types of improvements are installed.
  41. 41. Prioritizing Improvements Easy To Work With TRANSIT PASSENGER ENVIRONMENT PLAN Rider Surveys New Bus Stop Designs Many of VTA’s boxy, blue shelters are approaching the end of their 20-year lifetime. They will need to be replaced in the coming decade so we’re looking at new, more functional, more aesthetically pleasing shelter designs.
  42. 42. Prioritizing Improvements TRANSIT PASSENGER ENVIRONMENT PLAN Rider Surveys New Bus Stop Designs Easy To Work With In the past, VTA’s thinking about bus stop design has been somewhat rigid and it hasn’t been easy for cities, developers and the public to know how to work with VTA. The Transit Passenger Environment Plan explains all of VTA’s policies about bus stops and makes it easy to work with us.

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