Advanced searchingomnifile

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Advanced searchingomnifile

  1. 1. Advanced Searching in Omnifile
  2. 2. Start at the library homepage: http://www.scu.edu/library/
  3. 5. Click on O in the Alphabetical List of Databases
  4. 6. Click on O in the Alphabetical List of Databases
  5. 7. The 2 nd database listed is Omnifile.
  6. 8. Click on it.
  7. 9. You are now looking at the Advanced Search screen.
  8. 10. Let’s look a little closer at the search boxes.
  9. 11. Let’s look a little closer at the search boxes.
  10. 12. Let’s imagine we wanted to look for articles that might help us answer this question: “Does all the violence in some video games make children more violent?”
  11. 13. The first thing we need to do is decide what the most important KEYWORDS in that question are.
  12. 14. It is important to just use the most concrete, unambiguous words when searching library databases.
  13. 15. Our question again: “Does all the violence in some video games make children more violent?”
  14. 16. “ Does all the violence in some video games make children more violent?”
  15. 17. “ Does all the violence in some video games make children more violent?”
  16. 18. “ Does all the violence in some video games make children more violent?”
  17. 19. Let’s put children in one box
  18. 20. and violence in another.
  19. 21. In the third, put “video games” .
  20. 22. Notice the quotes around the phrase “video games” .
  21. 23. You need to put quotes around phrases in most databases.
  22. 24. And now we are ready to click
  23. 25. You are now looking at the search results.
  24. 26. There’s a lot to notice! Let me point out a few very important things . . .
  25. 27. Notice how many articles were retrieved.
  26. 28. Notice how many articles were retrieved.
  27. 29. Notice the links to the Full Text .
  28. 30. Notice the links to the Full Text .
  29. 31. You won’t ALWAYS see this, but more on that later…
  30. 32. Often you have your choice of HTML or PDF . HTML PDF
  31. 33. HTML is a webpage version of the original printed article . HTML
  32. 34. PDF is a photograph of the original printed article, with all the graphics, layout, etc. PDF
  33. 35. The PDF is usually the better choice for research papers. For one thing, it has page numbers! PDF
  34. 36. All of these 163 Results are ARTICLES in periodicals.
  35. 37. However, not all are from SCHOLARLY or PEER-REVIEWED journals.
  36. 38. There’s an easy way to find out which are most likely to be from scholarly journals.
  37. 39. Click on this box in the Refine your results panel.
  38. 40. Click on this box in the Refine your results panel. ✔
  39. 41. A little box will pop up.
  40. 42. Click the Update button.
  41. 43. That sure made a BIG difference!
  42. 44. 35 instead of 163 !
  43. 45. There are a couple other things it is important to notice here.
  44. 46. They have to do with LANGUAGE.
  45. 47. You need to think of library databases as having their own languages .
  46. 48. These languages appear as SUBJECTS here .
  47. 49. Look closely at these 1 st two records. Notice that all 3 of our search terms appear as SUBJECTS here .
  48. 50. children , violence & video games are all among the SUBJECTS in the 1 st article here .
  49. 51. In the 2nd article, though, only violence is among the SUBJECTS .
  50. 52. However, the other two IDEAS are there in the SUBJECTS .
  51. 53. They are expressed by different terms, though .
  52. 54. children is expressed by the phrase child development
  53. 55. And video games is expressed by the phrase computer games
  54. 56. Sounds rather nitpicky, doesn’t it?
  55. 57. Hard to believe those details are that important, isn’t it?
  56. 58. But, you have to remember –
  57. 59. You are not searching GOOGLE !
  58. 60. This nitpicky stuff often makes a huge difference in these databases .
  59. 61. So, the next step is to make some changes in our original search based on what we just learned!
  60. 62. Remember this search?
  61. 63. We used one box for each of our 3 ideas.
  62. 64. And, each idea was expressed by a single word or phrase.
  63. 65. We just learned that there is more than a single way to express two of those ideas.
  64. 66. children can be expressed by the phrase “child development” .
  65. 67. ” video games” can be expressed by the phrase “computer games” .
  66. 68. Don’t be scared <ul><li>but, this is going to get a little technical now . . . </li></ul>
  67. 69. Maybe you noticed that these boxes are connected by the Boolean AND.
  68. 70. Maybe you noticed that these boxes are connected by the Boolean AND.
  69. 71. YES! We are speaking Boolean here. This is a Boolean search statement you are looking at.
  70. 72. And, we are about to make it a more complex Boolean search statement.
  71. 73. We are are going to use the Boolean OR in two of our search boxes.
  72. 74. This is how we can use the two subject phrases we discovered – “computer games” & “child development”
  73. 75. This is how we can use the two subject phrases we discovered – “computer games” & “child development”
  74. 76. Notice that the search box expanded so we could type “or computer games”
  75. 77. There is actually a little shorthand device that would be useful here.
  76. 78. Because the root child is part of both of the search terms in that one box, we can do this:
  77. 79. Using the * at the end of a string of characters like child* tells the computer program to retrieve all forms of that word, including child child’s children childhood and, of course, any phrases including any of those words. It’s like you said this: child or child’s or children or childhood
  78. 80. Cool, eh?
  79. 81. So, if we make that final change to our search . . .
  80. 82. We end up with 46 results
  81. 83. Not a HUGE difference, but those additional ones could be the best!
  82. 84. Notice that the computer retained our limit to Scholarly (Peer Retrieved)
  83. 85. There’s one more thing you need to know about . . .
  84. 86. Let’s scroll down to view more Results
  85. 87. The first 7 items all have links to the fulltext of the articles.
  86. 88. However, when we get to item 8 . . .
  87. 89. There is no link to either HTML or PDF fulltext.
  88. 90. That doesn’t mean, however, that this article is not available to you.
  89. 91. In fact, the fulltext is available in two quick clicks.
  90. 92. The key is this link
  91. 93. Click on Find It @ SCU Libraries
  92. 94. Another tab will open in your browser. . .
  93. 95. In the best possible case, this is what you will see there.
  94. 96. These are instructions for getting that article.
  95. 97. There are many options for this particular article.
  96. 98. The best is that first one…
  97. 99. You can go directly to fulltext of that Article . . .
  98. 100. by clicking on EBSCOHost
  99. 101. You won’t always see that option . . .
  100. 102. Sometimes you will only get a link to the Journal
  101. 103. That link will take you to a list of the issues of the Journal and you will still have to search for that specific article.
  102. 104. If we do not have access to the journal in a database, but only in its PRINT form, then this option will be at the top.
  103. 105. If we do not have a subscription to this journal at all, you will get this option.
  104. 106. If you click on that, you will be asked to log in using your ACCESS card barcode, and you can request a copy of the article be sent to you by email.
  105. 107. That’s probably enough for now . . .
  106. 108. Go and search ONMIFILE!

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