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Chapter 3
Graphical descriptive techniques –
Nominal data
Chapter outline
3.1 Graphical techniques to describe nominal data
3.2 Selecting the appropriate chart: Which chart is best...
Learning Objectives
LO1 Construct charts to summarise nominal data
LO2 Use excel to draw appropriate charts for nominal
da...
Introduction
In this chapter, we introduce graphical and tabular
statistical methods that allow managers to summarise data...
3.1 Graphical techniques to describe
nominal data
The graphical presentations shown here are used
primarily for nominal da...
3.1 Graphical techniques to describe
nominal data
The only allowable calculation on nominal data is to count
the frequency...
Bar charts
The bar chart is mainly used for nominal data.
A bar chart graphically represents the frequency of each
categor...
Another useful chart to present nominal data is the pie
chart.
The pie chart is a very popular tool used to represent
the ...
Example 1
(Example 3.1, page 46)
A magazine readership survey carried out in New Zealand (Roy
Morgan, March 2012) shows th...
Example 1…
3.11
Women’s Magazine Readership , New Zealand, 2012
Example 1 – Solution
Identifying the technique
As the data are nominal, the only technique is to count
the number of occur...
Example 1 – Solution…
3.13
Bar chart - Using Excel
3.14
Example 1 – Solution…
3.15
Example 1 – Solution…
Pie chart - Calculating manually
In constructing a pie chart, the size of a slice of the circle...
3.16
Example 1 – Solution…
Pie chart - Calculating manually
Angle = (10/100)(3600) = 360
3.17
Example 1 – Solution…
Pie chart – Manually/Using Excel
3.2 Selecting the appropriate chart:
Which chart is best?
Which chart is best – bar or pie chart?
•  Depends on what you w...
Example 2
(Table 3.5, page 53)
If the focus is to compare the size of frequency of
various categories, a bar chart is more...
If the focus is on the distribution of each category either
pie or bar chart may be appropriate.
3.20
Model 2010 2011
1 To...
If the focus is on the change in market share, a bar
chart may be appropriate.
3.21
Example 2…
Component bar chart
A component bar chart represents all categories within
a single bar.
The bar is partitioned into compo...
Example 3
(Table 3.8, page 59)
3.23
Example 3…
3.24
The shares of likelihood in 2008 and 2010 can be
compared by displaying them in a component bar chart.
3.3 Graphical techniques to describe
ordinal data
When the data are ordinal (or ranked), treat the data as
nominal and use...
3.4 Describing the relationship between
two nominal variables
So far we’ve looked at tabular and graphical
techniques for ...
Describing the relationship between two
nominal variables…
Two ways to describe
•  A cross-classification table (or contin...
A cross-classification table is used to describe the
relationship between two nominal variables.
A cross-classification ta...
Example 4 - Newspaper Readership Survey
(Example 3.7, p68)
XM03-07 In a major Australian city there are four competing new...
Example 4…
Newspaper readership and occupation
3.30
By counting the number of times each of the 12
combinations occurs, we produce Table 3.9.
3.31
Example 4 – Solution
The frequencies can be depicted in graphical form
using a bar chart.
3.32
Example 4 – Solution…
If occupation and newspaper readership are related,
then there will be differences in the newspapers read
among the occupa...
3.34
Example 4 – Solution…
Example 4 – Solution…
Interpretation:
Notice that the relative frequencies in the rows 2 (white-collar)
and 3 (Professiona...
Graphical descriptive techniques – Nominal data Assignment Help
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Graphical descriptive techniques – Nominal data Assignment Help

  1. 1. Chapter 3 Graphical descriptive techniques – Nominal data
  2. 2. Chapter outline 3.1 Graphical techniques to describe nominal data 3.2 Selecting the appropriate chart: Which chart is best? 3.3 Graphical techniques to describe ordinal data 3.4 Describing the relationship between two nominal variables
  3. 3. Learning Objectives LO1 Construct charts to summarise nominal data LO2 Use excel to draw appropriate charts for nominal data LO3 Determine which chart is best for nominal data under a given circumstance LO4 Use charts to describe ordinal data LO5 Use various tabular and graphical techniques to analyse the relationships between two nominal variables.
  4. 4. Introduction In this chapter, we introduce graphical and tabular statistical methods that allow managers to summarise data visually in order to produce useful information – a technique often used in decision making We also discuss ways to use the techniques introduced in an effective and accurate way. 3.5
  5. 5. 3.1 Graphical techniques to describe nominal data The graphical presentations shown here are used primarily for nominal data. These graphical tools are most appropriate when the raw data can be naturally categorised in a meaningful manner. 3.6
  6. 6. 3.1 Graphical techniques to describe nominal data The only allowable calculation on nominal data is to count the frequency of each value of the variable. We can summarise the data in a table that presents the categories and their counts called a frequency distribution. A relative frequency distribution lists the categories and the proportion with which each occurs. The methods presented apply to both •  the entire population, and •  a sample selected from the population. 3.7
  7. 7. Bar charts The bar chart is mainly used for nominal data. A bar chart graphically represents the frequency of each category as a bar rising vertically from the horizontal axis. The height of each bar is proportional to the frequency of the corresponding category. 3.8
  8. 8. Another useful chart to present nominal data is the pie chart. The pie chart is a very popular tool used to represent the proportions of appearance for nominal data. A pie chart is a circle that is subdivided into slices whose areas are proportional to the frequencies (or relative frequencies), thereby displaying the proportion of occurrences of each category. 3.9 Pie charts
  9. 9. Example 1 (Example 3.1, page 46) A magazine readership survey carried out in New Zealand (Roy Morgan, March 2012) shows that women’s magazines are the most popular magazines, having the largest readership and increasing yearly sales. The survey results of 300 readers were recorded and are given below in coded form. The top six magazines considered here are (1) Australian Women’s Weekly (NZ Edition); (2) NZ Woman’s Weekly; (3) NZ Woman’s Day; (4) New Idea; (5) Next; and (6) That’s Life. The data, using the codes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, are listed below. Create the frequency distribution table and construct a bar chart and a pie chart to summarise the data. 3.10
  10. 10. Example 1… 3.11 Women’s Magazine Readership , New Zealand, 2012
  11. 11. Example 1 – Solution Identifying the technique As the data are nominal, the only technique is to count the number of occurrences (also known as frequencies) of each value and then convert these counts to proportions. The frequencies are presented using a bar chart. The proportions (market share of each magazine) are presented in a pie chart. 3.12
  12. 12. Example 1 – Solution… 3.13
  13. 13. Bar chart - Using Excel 3.14 Example 1 – Solution…
  14. 14. 3.15 Example 1 – Solution… Pie chart - Calculating manually In constructing a pie chart, the size of a slice of the circle is proportional to the percentage corresponding to that category. For example, the angle between the lines demarcating the Australian Women’s Weekly (NZ Edition) readers is 17.4 × 3.6 = 62.4o. The angles of the pie chart for the other five categories are calculated similarly, as shown in the table below:
  15. 15. 3.16 Example 1 – Solution… Pie chart - Calculating manually
  16. 16. Angle = (10/100)(3600) = 360 3.17 Example 1 – Solution… Pie chart – Manually/Using Excel
  17. 17. 3.2 Selecting the appropriate chart: Which chart is best? Which chart is best – bar or pie chart? •  Depends on what you want to emphasize •  If the focus is to compare the size or frequency of various categories, a bar chart may be appropriate •  If the focus is on the distribution (or share) of each category, use a pie chart 3.18
  18. 18. Example 2 (Table 3.5, page 53) If the focus is to compare the size of frequency of various categories, a bar chart is more appropriate. 3.19 Rank Model 2010 2011 1 Toyota 214,718 181,624 2 Holden 132,923 126,095 3 Ford 95,284 91,243 4 Mazda 84,777 88,333 5 Hyundai 80,038 87,008 6 Nissan 62,676 67,926 7 Mitsubishi 62,496 61,108 8 Volkswagen 38,016 44,740 9 Subaru 40,025 34,011 10 Honda 40,375 30,107 Total 851,328 812,195 Sales Table 3.5 New passenger vehicle sales in Queensland by top 10 individual car models, 2010 and 2011
  19. 19. If the focus is on the distribution of each category either pie or bar chart may be appropriate. 3.20 Model 2010 2011 1 Toyota 25.2 22.4 2 Holden 15.6 15.5 3 Ford 11.2 11.2 4 Mazda 10.0 10.9 5 Hyundai 9.4 10.7 6 Nissan 7.4 8.4 7 Mitsubish 7.3 7.5 8 Volkswage 4.5 5.5 9 Subaru 4.7 4.2 10 Honda 4.7 3.7 Total 100.0 100.0 Market  share  (%) Rank Table 3.5 New passenger vehicle sales in Queensland by top 10 individual car models, 2010 and 2011 Example 2…
  20. 20. If the focus is on the change in market share, a bar chart may be appropriate. 3.21 Example 2…
  21. 21. Component bar chart A component bar chart represents all categories within a single bar. The bar is partitioned into components, with the height of each component proportional to the frequency of the category that it represents. Component bar charts offer a good alternative to using two pie charts, when a comparison of two breakdowns is desired. 3.22
  22. 22. Example 3 (Table 3.8, page 59) 3.23
  23. 23. Example 3… 3.24 The shares of likelihood in 2008 and 2010 can be compared by displaying them in a component bar chart.
  24. 24. 3.3 Graphical techniques to describe ordinal data When the data are ordinal (or ranked), treat the data as nominal and use a bar or pie chart. For example, consider the average weekly household income for the 5 income quintiles (Example 3.6, page 60). 3.25
  25. 25. 3.4 Describing the relationship between two nominal variables So far we’ve looked at tabular and graphical techniques for one nominal variable. Now we will look at the relationship between two nominal variables using either tabular or graphical techniques. 3.26
  26. 26. Describing the relationship between two nominal variables… Two ways to describe •  A cross-classification table (or contingency table or cross-tabulation table) •  A variation of a bar chart 3.27
  27. 27. A cross-classification table is used to describe the relationship between two nominal variables. A cross-classification table lists the frequency of each combination of the values of the two nominal variables. 3.28 Describing the relationship between two nominal variables…
  28. 28. Example 4 - Newspaper Readership Survey (Example 3.7, p68) XM03-07 In a major Australian city there are four competing newspapers: N1, N2, N3 and N4. To help design advertising campaigns, the managers of the newspapers need to know which segments of the market are reading their newspapers. A survey was conducted to determine whether the newspaper readership and occupation are related. A sample of newspaper readers was asked to report which newspaper they read: N1, N2, N3, N4, and to indicate whether they were blue-collar worker (1), white-collar worker (2), or professional (3). 3.29
  29. 29. Example 4… Newspaper readership and occupation 3.30
  30. 30. By counting the number of times each of the 12 combinations occurs, we produce Table 3.9. 3.31 Example 4 – Solution
  31. 31. The frequencies can be depicted in graphical form using a bar chart. 3.32 Example 4 – Solution…
  32. 32. If occupation and newspaper readership are related, then there will be differences in the newspapers read among the occupations. An easy way to see this is to convert the frequencies in each row (or column) to relative frequencies using each row (or column) total. That is, compute the row (or column) totals and divide each frequency by its row (or column) total. 3.33 Example 4 – Solution…
  33. 33. 3.34 Example 4 – Solution…
  34. 34. Example 4 – Solution… Interpretation: Notice that the relative frequencies in the rows 2 (white-collar) and 3 (Professionals) are similar and that there are large differences between row 1 (blue-collar) and rows 2 and 3. This tells us that •  blue collar workers tend to read different newspapers from both white-collar workers and professionals; and •  white-collar workers and professionals are quite similar in their newspaper choices. 3.35

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