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Large Animal Rescue SA SES capability

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Presentation by Ben Birbeck of South Australian State Emergency Service at the 2016 Horse SA AGM.
http://www.horsesa.asn.au/emergency/large-animal-rescue/
http://www.ses.sa.gov.au/site/home.jsp

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Large Animal Rescue SA SES capability

  1. 1. Version 1.1 Large Animal Rescue
  2. 2. Why emergency services? • Fire and Emergency Services Act 2005 – Function of SES to ‘Undertake rescue’ Version 1.1 Large Animal Rescue – Rescue means ‘safe removal of persons or animals from actual or threatened danger or physical harm’
  3. 3. Its not new Version 1.1 Large Animal Rescue
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  6. 6. Version 1.1 Large Animal Rescue All about public safety
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  9. 9. Version 1.1 Large Animal Rescue Addressing the risk
  10. 10. Version 1.1 Large Animal Rescue
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  12. 12. Version 1.1 Large Animal Rescue
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  17. 17. Information is a guide only. Seek independent advice for your own situation In an Emergency 1. Dial 000 Never try to rescue a horse yourself. This call is free & so is the response 2. Call your Vet: Or work with the emergency responders to find one. The horse owner pays for the vet. If the owner is unknown, RSPCA/PIRSA may be called. Remember- a potential rescue can also be a horse welfare situation 3. Stay calm: Horses respond to human anxiety. Unless you are completely calm, you might inadvertently stress your horse even more. Keep your phone line clear 4. Calm your horse: Keep the accident scene as quiet as possible. Food is a good natural tranquilliser. A “friend” horse nearby may help. Remember, flashing lights and sirens will give you a sense of relief but may have the opposite effect on the horse. If possible (and safe) place a halter on the horse 5. Let the emergency services do their job: There are procedures to follow to ensure human safety as well as the horse. Be ready to follow instructions. Working Safely with Emergency Responders
  18. 18. Version 1.1 Large Animal Rescue Further information: Ben.Birbeck@sa.gov.au 0427 749 312

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