Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Surface Mount Technology

2,037 views

Published on

SURFACE MOUNT TECHNOLOGY WITH IS USE FULL IN CHIP DESIGING IN ALL THE LATEST ELECTRONICS GOODS.

Published in: Engineering
  • Beating The Odds Has Never Been Easier ... Watch how he does it ... ♣♣♣ http://t.cn/A6hP86vM
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Winning the Lottery is Based on This [7 Time Winner Tells All]  http://t.cn/Airfq84N
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Surface Mount Technology

  1. 1. BY S.NAVYA PRAVALIKA AND M.L .SINDHURI
  2. 2. A method of assembling printed wiring boards or hybrid circuits, where components are attached to pads on the board surface, as distinct from through-hole technology, where component leads are inserted into holes.
  3. 3. There are 3 major types of Surface Mount Assemblies:  Type I (Full SMT board with parts on one or both sides of the board)  Type II (Surface mount chip components are located on the secondary side of the Printed Board (PB). Active SMCs and DIPs are then found on the primary side)  Type III (They use passive chip SMCs on the secondary side, but on the primary side only DIPs are used)
  4. 4. •SURFACE MOUNT DESIGN •SOLDER PASTE APPLICATION •COMPONENT PLACEMENT •SOLDERING •CLEANING •REPAIR/REWORK
  5. 5. SURFACE MOUNT DESIGN
  6. 6. It depends on a number of factors • Market needs • Function • Package moisture sensitivity • Thermal and solder joints reliability • As the packaging density increases, thermal problems are compounded, with a potential adverse impact on overall product reliability
  7. 7. Feed mechanism used to load components into a pick-and-place machine SMD pick-and-place machine (with simulated motion blurs)
  8. 8.  Soldering is a process in which two or more metal items are joined together by melting and flowing a filler metal into the joint, the filler metal having a relatively low melting point.
  9. 9.  INFRARED SOLDERING  CONVENTIONAL HOT GAS SOLDERING
  10. 10. ADVANTAGES •Easy setup •No compressed air required •No component-specific nozzles (low costs) •Fast reaction of infrared source DISADVANTAGES •Central areas will be heated more than peripheral areas •Temperature can hardly be controlled, peaks cannot be ruled out •Covering of the neighboured components is necessary to prevent damage, which requires additional time for every board •Surface temperature depends on the component's reflection characteristics: dark surfaces will be heated more than lighter surfaces
  11. 11. During hot gas soldering, the energy for heating up the solder joint will be transmitted by a gaseous medium. This can be air or inert gas (nitrogen)
  12. 12. ADVANTAGES •Simulating reflow oven atmosphere •Switching between hot gas and nitrogen (economic use) •Standard and component- specific nozzles allow high reliability and reduced process time •Allow reproducible soldering profiles DISADVANTAGES •Thermal capacity of the heat generator results in slow reaction whereby thermal profiles can be distorted •A rework process usually undergoes some type of error, either human or machine-generated, and includes the following steps: 1. Melt solder and component removal 2. Residual solder removal 3. Printing of solder paste on PCB, direct component printing or dispensing 4. Placement and reflow of new component
  13. 13. •A specially formulated alloy in wire form is designed to melt at the low temperature of around 136 degrees F, 58 degrees C. It eliminates the potential for damage to the circuit, adjacent components, and the device itself. •Liquid flux and a soldering iron are used to melt this low temperature alloy that is specially formulated to stay molten long enough to react with existing solder. The SMT device can then be easily removed with a vacuum pen
  14. 14. Apply Low Residue Flux to all the leads on the SMD you're removing
  15. 15. With a soldering iron, melt the low temperature alloy
  16. 16. Easily lift device off the board with a vacuum pen
  17. 17. •Finally, the boards are visually inspected for missing or misaligned components and solder bridging. •If needed, they are sent to a rework station where a human operator corrects any errors. • They are then sent to the testing stations to verify that they operate correctly.
  18. 18. Thoroughly clean site and solder new device to PBC
  19. 19. •Smaller components. Smallest is currently 0.4 x 0.2 mm. •Much higher number of components and many more connections per component. •Fewer holes need to be drilled through abrasive boards. Simpler automated assembly. •Small errors in component placement are corrected automatically (the surface tension of the molten solder pulls the component into alignment with the solder pads). •Components can be placed on both sides of the circuit board. •Lower resistance and inductance at the connection (leading to better performance for high frequency parts). •Better mechanical performance under shake and vibration conditions. •SMT parts generally cost less than through-hole parts.
  20. 20. •The manufacturing processes for SMT are much more sophisticated than through-hole boards, raising the initial cost and time of setting up for production. •Manual prototype assembly or component-level repair is more difficult given the very small sizes of many SMDs. •SMDs can't be used with breadboards , requiring a custom PCB for every prototype. The PCB costs dozens to hundreds of dollars to fabricate and must be designed with specialized software. •SMDs' solder connections may be damaged by potting compounds going through thermal cycling.

×