SAACDHE 2014 conference: Second notice and call for abstracts (1)

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SAACDHE 2014 conference: Second notice and first call for abstracts

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SAACDHE 2014 conference: Second notice and call for abstracts (1)

  1. 1. 1 SECOND NOTICE THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN ASSOCIATION FOR COUNSELLING AND DEVELOPMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION INVITES YOU TO THE 35TH ANNUAL SAACDHE CONFERENCE 2014 IN GAUTENG HOSTED BY THE VAAL-NORTH WEST REGION 8-10 SEPTEMBER 2014 AT RIVERSIDE SUN RESORT HOTEL IN VANDERBIJLPARK CALL FOR PAPERS, POSTERS, WORKSHOPS AND SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS Dear SAACDHE Colleagues Our 35th SAACDHE Annual Conference is being held on the banks of the Vaal River at the Riverside Sun Resort Hotel and Conference Centre from 8-10 September 2014. With its breath taking scenery this is an event not to be missed! The second notice is a formal request for the submission of abstracts for papers, workshops and posters for presentations at the 2014 SAACDHE Conference. Below you will find the relevant guidelines for submission of abstracts. Please read these carefully and ensure all the requirements prior to submission of your abstract. CLOSING DATE for submission: 30 April 2014 Please bear in mind the conference theme as you do your preparations. It is a broad theme that should encourage contributions related to shaping our students in preparation for their futures. To remind you the theme is repeated below.
  2. 2. 2 2014 SAACDHE CONFERENCE THEME: “Shaping our students: Forming a future for global citizenship”. Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are tasked with the responsibility that goes beyond simply teaching the field specific content under study. That responsibility includes producing graduates with skills that go far beyond the generic, field-specific work and function knowledge. Historically, the role of HEIs has been to inculcate within graduates the highest level of disciplinary –specific content. Yet new demands for graduateness require graduates to be imbued with a corporate value of excellence that enables them to perform as efficiently and effectively as possible within the world of work. It is hoped that the 2014 SAACDHE conference can engage in the dialogue of (i) different work-related identities, (ii) the orientation of learners to develop in relation to their future labour market activities, and (iii) the preparation of students for future employment. To have the competitive advantage in the job market, students need to have developed their employability throughout their time in Higher Education Institutions. As student counselling practitioners we play a crucial role in developing our students’ employability. FOCUS AREAS TRANSFORMATION WITHIN STUDENT COUNSELLING AND DEVELOPMENT  As student counselling and development practitioners we have the responsibility to our students to engage in a dialogue of shaping these students for employment. According to Tomlinson (2007), the dialogue on employability persistently overlooks the perceptions that students have about their future work and employment, and the attitudes, identities and orientations they develop in relation to this. GRADUATENESS  There has been a range of global forces that contributed to the renewed attention of graduate attributes. They include the perspective of education as a lifelong process, focus in employability of graduates, and the development of outcome measures to justify the quality of higher education. Some universities are now endeavouring to produce graduates with the skills that are valued by employers and are seen to add to the country’s prosperity and social capital.  A key path to graduateness is through continuous engagement and constructive alignment with external stakeholders. Programs such as work readiness workshops, life skills development, personal development programs, mentorship and coaching etc., might be of value.
  3. 3. 3 EMPLOYABILITY  The challenges of new graduates not possessing the range of applied skills that employers are seeing as critical for success in the modern workplace are increasingly becoming a concern both nationally and internationally. The importance of integrating the relevant employability skills into the development of students has become essential. LEADERSHIP  Basic academic skills: include writing, reading, listening  Business acumen  Higher order skills: include continuous learning, creativity, decision-making, problem solving etc. These skills equip an individual to unlock their talent and aspire to change their lives.  Personal qualities where the bulk of the desired attributes are located include: self- confidence, adaptability, social skills, responsibility, team spirit, and self-directed management. GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES & COMPETENCIES  Higher order skills: include continuous learning, creativity, decision-making, problem solving etc. These skills equip an individual to unlock their talent and aspire to change their lives. PERSONAL SKILLS  Personal qualities where the bulk of the desired attributes are located include: self- confidence, adaptability, social skills, responsibility, team spirit, and self-directed management. STUDENT SUCCESS  There has been a range of global forces that contributed to the renewed attention of graduate attributes. They include the perspective of education as a lifelong process, focus in employability of graduates, and the development of outcome measures to justify the quality of higher education. SOCIO ECONOMIC CHALLENGES  Universities are now endeavouring to produce graduates with the skills that are valued by employers and are seen to add to the country’s prosperity and social capital.
  4. 4. 4 SUCCESS STORIES  Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are tasked with the responsibility that goes beyond simply teaching the field specific content under study. That responsibility includes producing graduates with skills that goes far beyond the generic, field-specific work and function knowledge. Historically, the role of HEIs has been to inculcate within graduates the highest level of disciplinary –specific content. Yet new demands for graduateness require graduates to be imbued with a corporate value of excellence that enables them to perform as efficiently and effectively as possible within the world of work.  Basic academic skills: include writing, reading, listening  Business acumen  Higher order skills: include continuous learning, creativity, decision-making, problem solving etc. These skills equip an individual to unlock their talent and aspire to change their lives.  Personal qualities where the bulk of the desired attributes are located include: self- confidence, adaptability, social skills, responsibility, team spirit, and self-directed management. Important information:  The first notice serves to stimulate your thinking around the themes on which your contributions (papers, posters and workshops) could be formulated.  The second notice will provide details on:  Registration procedures, dates and fees;  Accommodation and transport;  A formal Call for Abstracts and specific requirements for the different kinds of presentations.  A website link for the 2014 conference is in the process of being developed and will be linked to the SAACDHE website. PRESENTATION GUIDELINES Conference presentations should demonstrate relevance in respect of the conference theme. Presentations will fit into one of the following five categories:  Research papers  Descriptive conceptual papers  Training workshops  Discussions workshops/focus groups  Papers presented as posters The following guidelines should be followed with respect to each type of presentation: Research papers
  5. 5. 5 These are formal presentations which are based on rigorous research that has been conducted and presented in accordance with recognised academic standards. The quality of the research and presentation should be such that the paper qualifies for publication in a recognized journal. At the conference research papers will be evaluated according to the following criteria: Relevance to the conference theme: Was the paper closely related to the conference theme? Quality of research: Was the paper based on rigorous research conducted in accordance with recognized academic standards? Content, originality and innovation: Did the paper break new ground OR significantly expand your knowledge and understanding? Style and quality of presentation: Was the style of presentation and quality of aids of a high standard? Audience participation and response: Did the presentation generate enthusiastic participation and lively discussion from the audience? Descriptive/Conceptual papers These are less formal presentations, which while they may contain data from surveys and other research, are largely conceptual or descriptive in nature and are primarily intended to convey new insights, perspectives and/or experiences. At the conference descriptive/conceptual papers will be evaluated according to the following criteria: Relevance to the conference theme: Was the paper closely related to the conference theme? Content originality and innovation: Did the paper break new ground OR significantly expand your knowledge and understanding? Style and quality of presentation: Was the style of presentation and quality of aids of a high standard? Audience participant and response: Did the presentation generate enthusiastic participation and lively discussion from the audience?
  6. 6. 6 Training Workshops These are facilitated activity-based group interactions primarily intended to demonstrate process issues and/or impart new skills or insights. At the conference training workshops will be evaluted according to the following criteria: Relevance to the conference theme: Was the workshops closely related to the conference theme? Content originality and innovation: Did the workshop break new ground OR significantly expand your understanding and/or skills? Appropriateness of strucute and process: Was the structure and process of the workshop effective in achieving its goals/aims? Facilitations skills: Was the facilitator engaging and effective in managing the interactions of the group? Discussion/Focus groups: These are facilitated discussion groups: the primary intention of which participants to hsare thoughts, ideas and experiences in relation to a specific issue or topic: At the conference discussion/focusgroups will be evaluated according to the following criteria: Relevance to the conference theme: Was the discussion topic closely related to the conference theme? Content originality and innovation: Did the discussion break new ground OR significantly expant your understanding and/or skills? Diversity and significance of discussion: Did the discussion involve a meaningful exchange of diverse ideas, perspectives or experiences? Facilitations skills: Was the facilitator engaging and effective in managing the interactions of the group? Papers presented as posters: There are poster presentations, which visually represent, in summary form, the methods, results and findings of formal academic and related research. Guidelines  Format: aim, method, results, conclusion.  Use a readable size print on your poster.  Indicate the title, author (s) and institution. Instructions for the submission of abstracts Format  Abstract should be e-mails as Microsoft Word attachments to the following address/s: 25099272@nwu.ac.za saneth.dreyer@nwu.ac.za nomangwanem@vut.ac.za
  7. 7. 7  Abstracts must be in English;  Please use Arial, font size 10  Select the folowing Page Setup: A4 paper size Top Margin: 9.5cm Left and right Margins: 4.5cm Use single line-spacing Your abstract must be within the above margins and limited to 2 pages. The Layout of the abstract must be as follows: o Centre the title in CAPITAL letters at the top of the page. o Space o Names of the authors and their affiliation. Presenting author’s name/s to be underlined. o Space o The abstract Abstract requirements:  Paper: 250-300 words maximum describing the purpose, overview, outcomes and conclusion.  Workshop: 250-300 words and not than 30 words for the description of the pur- pose, the outline, techniques used, duration and maximum participants to attend.  Poster: 250-300 words description of the theme (in the case of a conceptual Poster), the purpose, overview, outcomes and conclusion. On a separate page please state: o Title of the abstrat. o Type of presentation category:  Research paper/s  Descriptive/conceptual paper/s  Training workshop/s  Discussion workshop/focus group  Paper presentation as poster o Presting author/s name o Address o Telephone and fax number o E-mail address o Organization/University o Country o Theme
  8. 8. 8 NB: All presenters must send their CV’s not longer than 2 pages and attach as a separate document. Also not that an Abstract will only be considered with a CV attached. REMINDER: The deadline for receipt of abstract is 30 April 2014.

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