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Employer
Internship Guide
for Off-Campus Internships
Introduction
Checklist
Developing a Program
• Goals
• Recruiting
• Learning Contract
• Training & Supervision
• Additional Items to Consider
• Evaluations
Part-Time Job vs. Internship
Legal Ramifications
CAREERDevelopmentCENTER
S U S Q U E H A N N A U N I V E R S I T Y W W W . S U S Q U . E D U / C A R E E R
career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu
Introduction
The Career Development Center at
Susquehanna University supports
students who are engaged in experi-
ential learning opportunities that offer
work related to his/her career interests,
clear supervision, and introduce the
student to additional mentoring and
networking. Employers offering a well
defined internship program will find
university support as well as a strong
pool of candidates.
More than 80% of students complete at
least one kind of experiential education
before graduation. This includes
internships, student teaching, and
research. Many majors at the University
allow students to earn credit for their
internships. Included in this guide is
a sample Learning Contract for credit
bearing experiences.
Internships are an essential piece of the
experience for students at Susquehan-
na University to prepare them for the
professional world while they are still
in college. Experiential education is at
the heart of our motto: Achieve, Lead,
Serve. Internships have also become
popular with employers because of the
many positive aspects interns bring to
the workplace. Some of the benefits for
an employer might include:
• Ability for the employer to assign
important projects to interns that were
previously not able to be considered;
• Opportunity for the employer to
market his or her company through
ongoing campus relations;
• Outside perspective(s) that may
provide new ideas to solve current
issues in the workplace;
• Prospect of offering permanent jobs
to trained and qualified students
after completion of internship and
graduation; potentially decreasing
training costs.
These are just a few of the benefits that
are seen when interns are hired. Each
individual company may experience
additional benefit that specifically per-
tain to it. The Employer Relations Team
has put together this guide to assist
employers navigate the internship
process from first consideration to the
intern’s first day.
Checklist
Just as the student must determine his/
her readiness to complete an intern-
ship, employers must assess readiness
and prepare for an upcoming quality
internship. To help get you started on
the decision to create an internship
program at your organization, we have
prepared a checklist of the most salient
questions. These questions are covered
more in-depth throughout the guide.
• How has your organization prepared
to hire interns?
• What are the logistics of the intern-
ship: timeframe, location, and hours?
• Has the company thought about insur-
ance liabilities when hiring interns?
• How many interns does the company
need? If there will be more than one
intern, will they work in a team or have
the opportunity to connect and share
their experiences?
• What type of student is the company
looking for? Specifically, what major
and/or skill set does the company
want to recruit?
• What type of projects will the intern be
assigned?
• Will the projects be short term, or
potentially be continued by another
intern?
• Will the intern’s projects relate to their
major?
• Will the interns be paid or unpaid, and
is the company aware of the Fair Labor
Standards Act and how it relates to
unpaid internships?
• Is there a dedicated supervisor to pro-
vide guidance?
• Does the potential supervisor have
additional time to work with the
student’s faculty advisor to facilitate
the student earning credit for the
internship?
• Will the intern have a dedicated work
area that will remain undisturbed?
• Have projects and tasks been devel-
oped so the intern has legitimate work
to do?
• Are there projects and educational op-
portunities separate from work tasks
that support learning objectives?
career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu
Internship Posting Criteria Developing a Program
An outline of categories to include in a
position has been provided. Once sent
to the Career Development Center, the
position and contact information will
be uploaded into our career manage-
ment system, Crusader Careers. This
allows only SU students to view and
apply for the position. If requested we
can also provide you with access to the
account to view applicants and post
new positions.
Full Company Name
Provide contact information for general
questions, such as name, telephone
number, and email. Also provide
contact information who application
materials should be forwarded to. The
location should be clarified (e.g. if it is a
satellite office/brand vs. headquarters).
The company website and relevant so-
cial media sites should also be stated.
Industry/Agency Description
Explain the organizations purpose
and population being served. Include
information on the department
hosting the internship. In addition,
mention points not clearly or easily
found on the website.
Experience and Qualifications
State required and preferred items. Ex-
amples include GPA, basic skills needed,
degree, majors, class year(s), etc.
Internship Description/Position Title
Describe the objective and purpose
of the internship. Also, state details
about the position. State compensation
amounts and whether they will be paid
an hourly wage, stipend, etc.
Roles and Responsibilities/Duties
Outline what tasks and projects the
intern will complete. Include learning
opportunities, such as mentoring and
networking activities that are not di-
rectly related to the intern’s daily tasks.
Important Dates
Identify application submission
deadlines. Also, include the internship
duration (weeks), start and end dates,
as well as hours per week. The
expectation is an intern will work no
more than 20 hours per week during
the semester. Summer internships
are able to work up to a full time 40
hour per week schedule.
How to Apply
Provide clear information if both a
resume and cover letter is required.
Outline if additional materials are need-
ed to complete the application such as
writing samples, references, etc.
In order to have a successful intern, it is essential
to develop an internship program with clear ex-
pectations and objectives. This will create not just
one positive experience, but give you a template
to continue getting quality candidates for years
to come. Several issues that should be considered
and addressed when developing a program are:
Goals
What are the goals that both the employer and
intern hope to fulfill?
The goals and expectations for the internship
must be clearly outlined for the company, em-
ployer, and student. Having a program that has a
specific description allows the employer to clearly
state expectations of the intern; this effort will
increase the number of qualified applications for
the position being offered.
Once interviewing begins, it is important to de-
termine the interviewee’s goals and objectives for
the internship to see if he/she would be a good fit
for the position.
Recruiting
When should recruitment of new interns begin?
Once the employer has outlined the internship
goals for the company, it is time to begin recruit-
ing for the position. Most companies that have
experience in hiring interns begin the search
about three to six months before the internship
start date.
What are successful ways of searching for and
recruiting new interns?
In addition to Crusader Careers mentioned on
Page 3 The Career Development Center has a vari-
ety of additional ways in which employers can be
involved on campus to further raise their visibility
to students which include:
• Employment & Internship Fair (Oct. Annually)
• Information Tables
• On-Campus Information Session
• Participating in mock interviews for students
• If alumni work within the organization inviting
them to attend Breakthrough, which is a week
long event where 200+ alumni come back to
campus to share their experiences with students
• Conducting On-Campus Interviews
Complete Learning Contract and Agreement
What is the learning contract and agreement?
The Learning Contract is a formal document that
outlines in writing expectations between the
employer and intern. The contract includes details
and facts about the position, the employer’s con-
tact information, payment policies, and academic
relationships, if applicable. If the student is doing
the internship for-credit, the student, employer,
and faculty member must sign off on the docu-
ment. A sample Learning Contract can be found
on the next page.
career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu
Developing a Program
If the student is NOT doing the internship for
credit, does the employer still need to fill out the
University Learning Contract?
In short, no. It is still strongly advised to either have
an in house learning contract created, or to use
the University Learning Contract, even if it is not
for credit. This way both employer and student has
agreed upon goals and expectations prior to the
start of the experience. This also allows evaluation
to be more productive as the experience comes to
a conclusion.
Orientation Process
Becoming oriented with a new setting is often
difficult and stressful when starting any new job.
Therefore, the intern needs to become acclimated
to the work environment in various ways. Sugges-
tions include:
• Give the intern a tour of the work area;
• Introduce the intern to the other staff members;
• Collaborate with the intern to develop a schedule,
as they may have classes or another job;
• Discuss the schedule, meeting times for the intern
and supervisor, as well as potential projects the
intern may be working on;
• Tell the intern that he/she will be provided with
feedback throughout the internship. The supervi-
sor should also explain how and when that feed-
back will be provided;
• Providing the intern with all materials concerning
pay schedule (if applicable), procedures for calling
in sick, and go over expectations for attire and
behavior.
Give the intern a stable workspace.
Desk sharing between individuals on alternate days
is often an acceptable practice for internships.
Training, Mentoring, & Supervision
What are the benefits of providing training, men-
toring, and supervision?
An organized training program and a dedicated
supervisor are critical to the internship program’s
success. Mentors are valuable for enhancing the
student’s learning process and providing opportu-
nities for development.
What types of training should be given?
The orientation and training process will vary de-
pending on the organization. The intern should be-
come familiar with the office and be appropriately
trained. An employee manual or similar document
is essential.
What role does the supervisor play in the intern’s
work?
It is necessary that the intern have a good super-
visor. A supervisor is most successful when he/she
has a vested interest in participating in this role;
therefore, it is important to find an individual who
is interested in the student’s learning process. The
supervisor will assign work to the intern and have
weekly meetings to ensure that things are running
smoothly and that the intern feels comfortable. The
intern should be delegated specific tasks and re-
sponsibilities because he/she does not know what
needs to be completed, unlike a full-time employ-
ee. The supervisor is there to assign tasks and make
sure work is being completed, not to micromanage.
career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu
Although the students may share a space with
other interns, it is important for them to accom-
plish their assignments in a designated location
complete with resources and tools needed to
effectively fulfill the job.
A computer, phone, and printer/copier must
be accessible. Supervisors will also plan to pair
interns with other working professionals within
the field and in other functional areas to educate
them on overall goals of the workplace.
The supervisor should give interns freedom to try
projects on their own, but it is necessary to be in
available if an intern has any questions. The su-
pervisor may notice changes in the behavior that
could signify potential problems and can then
educate the student on how to handle it.
Knowing the intern’s work style is a fundamen-
tal component for the completion of successful
internship. The supervisor needs to take note of
how the intern works best and try to maximize
those experiences.
Additional Items to Consider
What academic year is best for an internship?
Some employers will offer internships to stu-
dents at any point in their college career, whereas
others choose to wait until the student is either a
sophomore or junior.
Will the student be required to complete certain
coursework prior to the internship?
Some employers will require previous coursework
in the company’s field, while others might accept
students with no prior academic background in
that field.
What is the size of the office? How many other
staff members are there?
These conditions are necessary to ensure an ade-
quate amount of work, a designated workspace,
and a feeling of belonging for the intern.
What is the role of other staff members in rela-
tion to the intern?
Coworkers have an important role in facilitating
the intern’s professional development by making
him/her feel comfortable in the workplace and
providing advice when needed.
What is the length of the internship?
The duration of a quality internship may vary
from eight weeks up to two years depending on
how much time the employer and intern are able
to commit.
How is the intern similar to and different from a
regular hire?
Will the intern have an email account and phone
number? Ideally these should be set up prior to
the intern’s first day.
Developing a Program Part-Time Job vs. Internship
A crucial part of the intern’s experience is contributing to the organization through meaningful work, such
as career-related tasks that encourage and allow the student to learn professionalism and obtain skills he/
she does not yet posses. Some of the main differences between a part-time job and an internship include:
Part-Time Job Internship
Wage Monetary Pay/no pay, credit/no credit, or credit and
pay
Learning
Goals
Learn tasks of job in order to complete
the work adequately but not necessarily
for personal gain
Learning plans and objectives reflect the
goals of the student, the outcomes expect-
ed by the employers, and the requirements
of a faculty member if for credit
Workload Is assigned work that needs to be
completed which may not be necessarily
professional in nature
Is assigned projects or ongoing work that is
purposeful and of a professional nature
Duration &
Hours
No specific start/end date or absolute
designated time frame that corresponds
to an academic term
Typically part time (10-15 hours per week)
in a semester (12-14 weeks) or a summer
(2-3 months)
Supervisor
Role
An authority figure to whom the
employee reports
A mentor figure to aid the student in the
learning process
career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu
Legal Ramifications: Hiring & PayingYour Intern
When can interns be unpaid?
The U.S. Department of Labor (U.S. DOL)
specifies through the Fair Labor Stan-
dards Act (FLSA) that an internship can
be legally be unpaid ONLY if:
• The training, even though it includes
actual operation of the facilities of
the employer, is similar to that which
would be given in a vocational school;
• The training is for the benefit of the
trainees or students;
• The employer who provides the train-
ing receives no immediate advantage
from the activities of the trainees/stu-
dents and, on occasion, the employer’s
operation may even be impeded;
• The trainees or students do not dis-
place regular employees, but work
under close supervision;
• The trainees or students are not nec-
essarily entitled to a job at the conclu-
sion of the training period; and
• The employer and the trainees/stu-
dents understand that the trainees/
students are not entitled to wages for
the time spent in training.
How much, if anything does an intern
get paid?
For a profit bearing organization, if ANY
of the above six criteria are not upheld,
the intern must be paid the minimum
wage or a higher hourly rate if qualified;
the intern will technically be considered
an employee, according to the U.S. DOL.
Non-profits, government agencies, and
educational institutions are exempt
from FLSA.
What are the steps that need to be
taken when paying an intern?
If payments will be made at regular in-
tervals or on a pay period, the employer
should check with the internal human
resources professional or payroll profes-
sional to verify payment methods.
If the intern is to receive a stipend, the
amount will be paid upon completion
of the internship. The stipend amount
and date of pay should be stated in a
written contract of agreement.
Does the company have to provide
workers’ compensation?
Workers’compensation is provided to
replace wages and medical care pro-
grams for an employee whose injuries
or illnesses are work related. For more
information, visit U.S. Department of La-
bor’s Office of Workers’Compensation.
Does the company need a formal
agreement with Susquehanna Univer-
sity?
Though not required, some employ-
ers find it useful to have an affiliation
agreement between the employer and
the University.
What is the policy for international
students?
Does your company allow non-U.S.
citizens to work as interns? The compa-
ny must determine if it can hire inter-
national students who have different
residency or visa credentials. Consult
with your human resources and/or
legal departments to learn if there are
specific hiring criteria for international
students.
career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu
EmployerInternshipGuide

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EmployerInternshipGuide

  • 1. Employer Internship Guide for Off-Campus Internships Introduction Checklist Developing a Program • Goals • Recruiting • Learning Contract • Training & Supervision • Additional Items to Consider • Evaluations Part-Time Job vs. Internship Legal Ramifications CAREERDevelopmentCENTER S U S Q U E H A N N A U N I V E R S I T Y W W W . S U S Q U . E D U / C A R E E R
  • 2. career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu Introduction The Career Development Center at Susquehanna University supports students who are engaged in experi- ential learning opportunities that offer work related to his/her career interests, clear supervision, and introduce the student to additional mentoring and networking. Employers offering a well defined internship program will find university support as well as a strong pool of candidates. More than 80% of students complete at least one kind of experiential education before graduation. This includes internships, student teaching, and research. Many majors at the University allow students to earn credit for their internships. Included in this guide is a sample Learning Contract for credit bearing experiences. Internships are an essential piece of the experience for students at Susquehan- na University to prepare them for the professional world while they are still in college. Experiential education is at the heart of our motto: Achieve, Lead, Serve. Internships have also become popular with employers because of the many positive aspects interns bring to the workplace. Some of the benefits for an employer might include: • Ability for the employer to assign important projects to interns that were previously not able to be considered; • Opportunity for the employer to market his or her company through ongoing campus relations; • Outside perspective(s) that may provide new ideas to solve current issues in the workplace; • Prospect of offering permanent jobs to trained and qualified students after completion of internship and graduation; potentially decreasing training costs. These are just a few of the benefits that are seen when interns are hired. Each individual company may experience additional benefit that specifically per- tain to it. The Employer Relations Team has put together this guide to assist employers navigate the internship process from first consideration to the intern’s first day. Checklist Just as the student must determine his/ her readiness to complete an intern- ship, employers must assess readiness and prepare for an upcoming quality internship. To help get you started on the decision to create an internship program at your organization, we have prepared a checklist of the most salient questions. These questions are covered more in-depth throughout the guide. • How has your organization prepared to hire interns? • What are the logistics of the intern- ship: timeframe, location, and hours? • Has the company thought about insur- ance liabilities when hiring interns? • How many interns does the company need? If there will be more than one intern, will they work in a team or have the opportunity to connect and share their experiences? • What type of student is the company looking for? Specifically, what major and/or skill set does the company want to recruit? • What type of projects will the intern be assigned? • Will the projects be short term, or potentially be continued by another intern? • Will the intern’s projects relate to their major? • Will the interns be paid or unpaid, and is the company aware of the Fair Labor Standards Act and how it relates to unpaid internships? • Is there a dedicated supervisor to pro- vide guidance? • Does the potential supervisor have additional time to work with the student’s faculty advisor to facilitate the student earning credit for the internship? • Will the intern have a dedicated work area that will remain undisturbed? • Have projects and tasks been devel- oped so the intern has legitimate work to do? • Are there projects and educational op- portunities separate from work tasks that support learning objectives?
  • 3. career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu Internship Posting Criteria Developing a Program An outline of categories to include in a position has been provided. Once sent to the Career Development Center, the position and contact information will be uploaded into our career manage- ment system, Crusader Careers. This allows only SU students to view and apply for the position. If requested we can also provide you with access to the account to view applicants and post new positions. Full Company Name Provide contact information for general questions, such as name, telephone number, and email. Also provide contact information who application materials should be forwarded to. The location should be clarified (e.g. if it is a satellite office/brand vs. headquarters). The company website and relevant so- cial media sites should also be stated. Industry/Agency Description Explain the organizations purpose and population being served. Include information on the department hosting the internship. In addition, mention points not clearly or easily found on the website. Experience and Qualifications State required and preferred items. Ex- amples include GPA, basic skills needed, degree, majors, class year(s), etc. Internship Description/Position Title Describe the objective and purpose of the internship. Also, state details about the position. State compensation amounts and whether they will be paid an hourly wage, stipend, etc. Roles and Responsibilities/Duties Outline what tasks and projects the intern will complete. Include learning opportunities, such as mentoring and networking activities that are not di- rectly related to the intern’s daily tasks. Important Dates Identify application submission deadlines. Also, include the internship duration (weeks), start and end dates, as well as hours per week. The expectation is an intern will work no more than 20 hours per week during the semester. Summer internships are able to work up to a full time 40 hour per week schedule. How to Apply Provide clear information if both a resume and cover letter is required. Outline if additional materials are need- ed to complete the application such as writing samples, references, etc. In order to have a successful intern, it is essential to develop an internship program with clear ex- pectations and objectives. This will create not just one positive experience, but give you a template to continue getting quality candidates for years to come. Several issues that should be considered and addressed when developing a program are: Goals What are the goals that both the employer and intern hope to fulfill? The goals and expectations for the internship must be clearly outlined for the company, em- ployer, and student. Having a program that has a specific description allows the employer to clearly state expectations of the intern; this effort will increase the number of qualified applications for the position being offered. Once interviewing begins, it is important to de- termine the interviewee’s goals and objectives for the internship to see if he/she would be a good fit for the position. Recruiting When should recruitment of new interns begin? Once the employer has outlined the internship goals for the company, it is time to begin recruit- ing for the position. Most companies that have experience in hiring interns begin the search about three to six months before the internship start date. What are successful ways of searching for and recruiting new interns? In addition to Crusader Careers mentioned on Page 3 The Career Development Center has a vari- ety of additional ways in which employers can be involved on campus to further raise their visibility to students which include: • Employment & Internship Fair (Oct. Annually) • Information Tables • On-Campus Information Session • Participating in mock interviews for students • If alumni work within the organization inviting them to attend Breakthrough, which is a week long event where 200+ alumni come back to campus to share their experiences with students • Conducting On-Campus Interviews Complete Learning Contract and Agreement What is the learning contract and agreement? The Learning Contract is a formal document that outlines in writing expectations between the employer and intern. The contract includes details and facts about the position, the employer’s con- tact information, payment policies, and academic relationships, if applicable. If the student is doing the internship for-credit, the student, employer, and faculty member must sign off on the docu- ment. A sample Learning Contract can be found on the next page.
  • 4. career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu Developing a Program If the student is NOT doing the internship for credit, does the employer still need to fill out the University Learning Contract? In short, no. It is still strongly advised to either have an in house learning contract created, or to use the University Learning Contract, even if it is not for credit. This way both employer and student has agreed upon goals and expectations prior to the start of the experience. This also allows evaluation to be more productive as the experience comes to a conclusion. Orientation Process Becoming oriented with a new setting is often difficult and stressful when starting any new job. Therefore, the intern needs to become acclimated to the work environment in various ways. Sugges- tions include: • Give the intern a tour of the work area; • Introduce the intern to the other staff members; • Collaborate with the intern to develop a schedule, as they may have classes or another job; • Discuss the schedule, meeting times for the intern and supervisor, as well as potential projects the intern may be working on; • Tell the intern that he/she will be provided with feedback throughout the internship. The supervi- sor should also explain how and when that feed- back will be provided; • Providing the intern with all materials concerning pay schedule (if applicable), procedures for calling in sick, and go over expectations for attire and behavior. Give the intern a stable workspace. Desk sharing between individuals on alternate days is often an acceptable practice for internships. Training, Mentoring, & Supervision What are the benefits of providing training, men- toring, and supervision? An organized training program and a dedicated supervisor are critical to the internship program’s success. Mentors are valuable for enhancing the student’s learning process and providing opportu- nities for development. What types of training should be given? The orientation and training process will vary de- pending on the organization. The intern should be- come familiar with the office and be appropriately trained. An employee manual or similar document is essential. What role does the supervisor play in the intern’s work? It is necessary that the intern have a good super- visor. A supervisor is most successful when he/she has a vested interest in participating in this role; therefore, it is important to find an individual who is interested in the student’s learning process. The supervisor will assign work to the intern and have weekly meetings to ensure that things are running smoothly and that the intern feels comfortable. The intern should be delegated specific tasks and re- sponsibilities because he/she does not know what needs to be completed, unlike a full-time employ- ee. The supervisor is there to assign tasks and make sure work is being completed, not to micromanage.
  • 5. career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu Although the students may share a space with other interns, it is important for them to accom- plish their assignments in a designated location complete with resources and tools needed to effectively fulfill the job. A computer, phone, and printer/copier must be accessible. Supervisors will also plan to pair interns with other working professionals within the field and in other functional areas to educate them on overall goals of the workplace. The supervisor should give interns freedom to try projects on their own, but it is necessary to be in available if an intern has any questions. The su- pervisor may notice changes in the behavior that could signify potential problems and can then educate the student on how to handle it. Knowing the intern’s work style is a fundamen- tal component for the completion of successful internship. The supervisor needs to take note of how the intern works best and try to maximize those experiences. Additional Items to Consider What academic year is best for an internship? Some employers will offer internships to stu- dents at any point in their college career, whereas others choose to wait until the student is either a sophomore or junior. Will the student be required to complete certain coursework prior to the internship? Some employers will require previous coursework in the company’s field, while others might accept students with no prior academic background in that field. What is the size of the office? How many other staff members are there? These conditions are necessary to ensure an ade- quate amount of work, a designated workspace, and a feeling of belonging for the intern. What is the role of other staff members in rela- tion to the intern? Coworkers have an important role in facilitating the intern’s professional development by making him/her feel comfortable in the workplace and providing advice when needed. What is the length of the internship? The duration of a quality internship may vary from eight weeks up to two years depending on how much time the employer and intern are able to commit. How is the intern similar to and different from a regular hire? Will the intern have an email account and phone number? Ideally these should be set up prior to the intern’s first day. Developing a Program Part-Time Job vs. Internship A crucial part of the intern’s experience is contributing to the organization through meaningful work, such as career-related tasks that encourage and allow the student to learn professionalism and obtain skills he/ she does not yet posses. Some of the main differences between a part-time job and an internship include: Part-Time Job Internship Wage Monetary Pay/no pay, credit/no credit, or credit and pay Learning Goals Learn tasks of job in order to complete the work adequately but not necessarily for personal gain Learning plans and objectives reflect the goals of the student, the outcomes expect- ed by the employers, and the requirements of a faculty member if for credit Workload Is assigned work that needs to be completed which may not be necessarily professional in nature Is assigned projects or ongoing work that is purposeful and of a professional nature Duration & Hours No specific start/end date or absolute designated time frame that corresponds to an academic term Typically part time (10-15 hours per week) in a semester (12-14 weeks) or a summer (2-3 months) Supervisor Role An authority figure to whom the employee reports A mentor figure to aid the student in the learning process
  • 6. career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu Legal Ramifications: Hiring & PayingYour Intern When can interns be unpaid? The U.S. Department of Labor (U.S. DOL) specifies through the Fair Labor Stan- dards Act (FLSA) that an internship can be legally be unpaid ONLY if: • The training, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to that which would be given in a vocational school; • The training is for the benefit of the trainees or students; • The employer who provides the train- ing receives no immediate advantage from the activities of the trainees/stu- dents and, on occasion, the employer’s operation may even be impeded; • The trainees or students do not dis- place regular employees, but work under close supervision; • The trainees or students are not nec- essarily entitled to a job at the conclu- sion of the training period; and • The employer and the trainees/stu- dents understand that the trainees/ students are not entitled to wages for the time spent in training. How much, if anything does an intern get paid? For a profit bearing organization, if ANY of the above six criteria are not upheld, the intern must be paid the minimum wage or a higher hourly rate if qualified; the intern will technically be considered an employee, according to the U.S. DOL. Non-profits, government agencies, and educational institutions are exempt from FLSA. What are the steps that need to be taken when paying an intern? If payments will be made at regular in- tervals or on a pay period, the employer should check with the internal human resources professional or payroll profes- sional to verify payment methods. If the intern is to receive a stipend, the amount will be paid upon completion of the internship. The stipend amount and date of pay should be stated in a written contract of agreement. Does the company have to provide workers’ compensation? Workers’compensation is provided to replace wages and medical care pro- grams for an employee whose injuries or illnesses are work related. For more information, visit U.S. Department of La- bor’s Office of Workers’Compensation. Does the company need a formal agreement with Susquehanna Univer- sity? Though not required, some employ- ers find it useful to have an affiliation agreement between the employer and the University. What is the policy for international students? Does your company allow non-U.S. citizens to work as interns? The compa- ny must determine if it can hire inter- national students who have different residency or visa credentials. Consult with your human resources and/or legal departments to learn if there are specific hiring criteria for international students.
  • 7. career@susqu.edu | 570 372 4146 | @SusquCareerSU Career Development Center | www.career.susqu.edu