Lecture 15 age of territorial states (b)

553 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
553
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Lecture 15 age of territorial states (b)

  1. 1. History 26 Paper Topics <ul><li>Keeping in mind the historical, social, and cultural context of this poem, what can the Epic of Gilgamesh tell us about the ideals of kingship in ancient Mesopotamia? </li></ul><ul><li>2) How does the Epic of Creation reflect contemporary concerns? What can it tell us about the political, social, and cultural context of second-millennium Babylonia? </li></ul>
  2. 2. HISTORY 26 Lecture Fifteen: The Age of Territorial States ( c . 1500 - 1200 BC)
  3. 3. The Near East, c . 1500 BC
  4. 4. The ‘Household’ of Great Powers <ul><li>From city-states to territorial states </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mitanni, followed by Assyria in northern Mesopotamia and Syria </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kassite Babylonia in southern Mesopotamia </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elam in southwest Iran </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Hittite New Kingdom in Anatolia </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Egypt as a perpetual territorial state </li></ul><ul><li>The city-states of Syria and Palestine </li></ul>
  5. 5. Diplomacy <ul><li>Diplomatic letters, written on clay tablets in Babylonian by professional scribes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Amarna letters: 350 tablets found at Akhetaten covering the period from 1365 to 1335 BC </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Near Eastern rulers as members of a single household or community </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Between ‘brother’ and ‘brother’, or ‘lord’ and ‘servant’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Status was important and treaties personal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Royal marriages frequently sealed treaties </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gift-exchange </li></ul>
  6. 6. Warfare <ul><li>A constant rivalry to extend territorial influence </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict occurred in two ways: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In Syria and Palestine, territorial states acted through proxies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>At first, Egypt vs. Mitanni; after 1340, Egypt vs. the Hittites </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In other regions without such buffer zones, direct conflict occurred </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Primarily border wars; no real attempt at annexation or destruction </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Palace Culture and the International Elite <ul><li>A growing discrepancy between a tiny elite centered on the palace and dependent on the king, and the free but exploited rural populace </li></ul><ul><li>The emergence of an international elite </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A hybrid of local traditions mixed with foreign influence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The importance of Babylonian language and literature </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Competition in wealth and prestige </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. The Tomb of Tutankhamun
  9. 9. The Tomb of Tutankhamun
  10. 10. Hattusa (Hittite New Kingdom)
  11. 11. Assur (Middle Assyrian Temple)
  12. 12. Ziggurat at Dur-Kurigalzu (Babylonia)
  13. 13. Mycenaean Greece

×