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March 2017
Our Vision
for top global talent.
a go-to destination
To establish BC as a global
top 10 tech ecosystem and
This report assesses the demand and supply of human capital among
32 occupations comprising BC’s thriving tech sector, to ...
Constrained Growth Scenario: 165,500
We forecast the development of about
16,500 new tech jobs between 2016 - 2021.
Howeve...
BC Tech Sector Overview
BC’s tech sector includes a wide array of industries and regions across the province.
BC Tech Scop...
Source: KPMG British Columbia Technology Report Card, 2015 Edition
Distribution and Growth of Companies
In a sign of progr...
BC Tech Sector Overview
Tech Sector Revenue & Employment
While BC’s tech sector revenue growth has increased by a CAGR of ...
Top occupations
by 2015 include:
Employment Composition & Top Jobs
Technical and
specializedroles
comprisethe largest
curr...
As the province shifts to a knowledge economy, successfully scaling
BC’s strong base of tech startups into globally compet...
Tech Labour Demand & Supply Forecasts - 2016-2021
New entrants: 40%
(New graduates from post-
secondary institutions)
Othe...
Forecasted supply by source
12,500 tech jobs + 4,000 non-tech jobs
Forecasted labour demand
As is, BC Tech is on pace to g...
Employment Demand & Supply Forecasts - 2016-2021
Withrapidexpansion, BCtechwillgrowto196,000jobsby2021,growing ataCAGRof4....
Employment Demand & Supply Forecasts - 2016-2021
Approximately 5,000 jobs will go unfilled per year, totaling nearly 30,50...
To meet the talent shortage, BC will need to boost supply from key sources of talent.
Examining Supply Source Challenges
S...
Enrollment Numbers
Job Readiness and Skills Development
Co-op and Experiential Learning
Examining Supply Source Challenges...
Sourcing channels
Wait times and unclear instructions
Job readiness & workplace integration
Examining Supply Source Challe...
Challenges: Recruiting and Retaining Talent in BC
Examining Supply Source Challenges
Lack of Mid &
Senior level talent
an ...
Examining Supply Source Challenges
Challenges: Other Local Talent
Career transitioners
require retraining and
upskilling i...
Recap
For each of the labour sources, there are large
gaps between what BC is on track to produce
and what is needed by th...
Increase the capacity
of post-secondary
programs to produce
additional graduates
eachyearintech-relevant
programs as well ...
Thank You
policy@wearebctech.com
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2016 Tech TalentBC Report

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In the last 15 years, BC’s tech sector has outpaced the province’s overall economy,
growing by 91% to generate over $15 billion dollars in GDP per year2. The sector’s
prominence will only increase as technology products and services become ever
more ubiquitous and deeply interwoven into all industries, including those not traditionally associated with tech.

Despite this promise, BC’s tech sector faces a significant headwind: a growing talent
deficit. The availability of talent has been a perennial concern for companies in the
sector. This was perhaps most prominently highlighted in 2016’s #BCTECH Strategy,
in which tech talent was identified as a fundamental pillar of a thriving tech sector –
and was suggested to be lacking in the province.

The goal of the 2016 TechTalentBC Report is to quantify this talent deficit and analyze
its factors in order to diagnose difficulties and identify specific areas in which remedial
action can be taken to ensure that BC’s tech companies have access to the quantity
and quality of tech talent required to compete and become global leaders.

Published in: Technology
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2016 Tech TalentBC Report

  1. 1. March 2017
  2. 2. Our Vision for top global talent. a go-to destination To establish BC as a global top 10 tech ecosystem and
  3. 3. This report assesses the demand and supply of human capital among 32 occupations comprising BC’s thriving tech sector, to address employer concerns about talent shortages constraining growth. Purpose & Formation Objective Sources Primary Data 11 surveys,5 subsector committees, 5 workforce committees, 27 key informant interviews Secondary Data BC Stats, Stats Canada, LMO, LFS, BC Headset, BC Tech Jobs, Partner resources, Other This report is part of a Sector Labour Market Partnership (LMP) program supported by: Produced in partnership with:Partners
  4. 4. Constrained Growth Scenario: 165,500 We forecast the development of about 16,500 new tech jobs between 2016 - 2021. However, the demand for employment from BC’s tech companies is nearly 3x higher. Key Findings Expanded Growth Scenario: 196,000 BC’s tech sector will be able to support 47,000 new jobs by 2021, representing 30,500 additional, unmet jobs (on top of the 16,500 in the constrained growth scenario). To support the 30,500 additional job openings, BC will require access to new, key sources of talent by 2021: 12,500 new entrants (new graduates) to fill entry-level roles. 8,500 Immigrants to fill key senior-level or specialized roles. 9,500 other workers (reskilled workers, career transitioners, and under- represented groups) to fill key roles. Computer programmers, Software engineers, Graphic designers, Systems analysts, QA UX/UI designers, civil and electrical engineers, computer/network technicians, technical sales specialists and business managers. BC tech’s top in-demand occupations BC's tech sector reached approx. 149,000 jobs in 2015 and is on pace to grow to 165,500 or 196,000 by 2021 under two possible scenarios:
  5. 5. BC Tech Sector Overview BC’s tech sector includes a wide array of industries and regions across the province. BC Tech Scope: Subsectors and Regions Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Lifesciences (LS) Interactive and Digital Media (IDM) Cleantech (CT) Engineering Services (ES)
  6. 6. Source: KPMG British Columbia Technology Report Card, 2015 Edition Distribution and Growth of Companies In a sign of progress, the number of companies growing from small to medium and large sizes has increased. BC Tech Sector Overview Over 80% of tech companies in BC are considered small (<10 employees) Grew by 17% Grew by 18% Grew by 14% Companies with <10 Employees 10-19 Employees 20-49 Employees 50+ Employees
  7. 7. BC Tech Sector Overview Tech Sector Revenue & Employment While BC’s tech sector revenue growth has increased by a CAGR of 6%, the future demand for tech talent will outpace the current growth of the sector’s employment rate.
  8. 8. Top occupations by 2015 include: Employment Composition & Top Jobs Technical and specializedroles comprisethe largest current and anticipated portionof hiringneeds. BC Tech Sector Overview
  9. 9. As the province shifts to a knowledge economy, successfully scaling BC’s strong base of tech startups into globally competitive anchor companies is of critical importance to the province’s future prosperity. Talent Fuels the BC tech sector. Building a solid foundation of human capital, whether home grown or globally sourced, is among our critical success factors. Our Opportunity – BILL TAM, President & CEO BC Tech Association “ ”
  10. 10. Tech Labour Demand & Supply Forecasts - 2016-2021 New entrants: 40% (New graduates from post- secondary institutions) Other local talent: 31% (Talent sourced from other local supply groups, including underrepresented groups and career transitioners) Immigrants: 29% (Talent sourced from outside of Canada) Employment in Key Sources of Talent
  11. 11. Forecasted supply by source 12,500 tech jobs + 4,000 non-tech jobs Forecasted labour demand As is, BC Tech is on pace to grow to 165,500+ jobs by 2021, adding 16,500+ net new jobs at a CAGR of 1.8%. Employment Demand & Supply Forecasts - 2016-2021 The Constrained Growth Scenario 6,500 from new entrants 5,000 from immigration 5,000 from other local supply
  12. 12. Employment Demand & Supply Forecasts - 2016-2021 Withrapidexpansion, BCtechwillgrowto196,000jobsby2021,growing ataCAGRof4.7%andrequiring anadditional 47,000+workers. The Expanded Growth Scenario ~19,000 from new entrants ~13,500 from immigration ~14,500 from other local supply Forecasted supply by source 36,000 tech jobs + 11,000 non-tech jobs Forecasted labour demand
  13. 13. Employment Demand & Supply Forecasts - 2016-2021 Approximately 5,000 jobs will go unfilled per year, totaling nearly 30,500 unfilled jobs by 2021. Meeting unmet demand for talent Labour Composition To meet the demand of 35,000 jobs, the tech sector will require: 12,500 new entrants 8,500 immigrants 9,500 other local supply
  14. 14. To meet the talent shortage, BC will need to boost supply from key sources of talent. Examining Supply Source Challenges Supply Challenges from Talent Sources New entrants (New graduates from post- secondary institutions) Other local talent (Talent sourced from other local supply groups, including underrepresented groups and career transitioners) Immigrants (Talent sourced from outside of Canada)
  15. 15. Enrollment Numbers Job Readiness and Skills Development Co-op and Experiential Learning Examining Supply Source Challenges Challenges: New Entrants 40% of roles sourced are in the new entry segment, indicating a need for ongoing and annual supply of graduates from PSE institutions. Capacity in engineering and tech programs has not been keeping up with interest, only 65% of applicants admitted between 2011-2015. In 2013 only 17% of BC undergrads pursued a degree in tech, less than Ontario and Alberta. Tech employers rank the quality of new grads' technical skills favourably, where as interpersonal and communications skills have room to grow. Of the top tech-related university disciplines (Engineering & Tech and Mechanical & Electrical Engineering) had co-op placements with participation rates over 50% from 2010 - 2014.
  16. 16. Sourcing channels Wait times and unclear instructions Job readiness & workplace integration Examining Supply Source Challenges Challenges: Immigrants Streamlining immigration pathways would help all sub-sector companies source skilled talent for to mid to senior level and specialized roles. The top immigration channels used are Express Entry, BC Provincial Nominee Program and the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. Average wait times is four to six months and 20% of companies report seven months or longer. High ratings for technical skills and job performance but there is room to grow in interpersonal skills, ramp up time and cultural fit.
  17. 17. Challenges: Recruiting and Retaining Talent in BC Examining Supply Source Challenges Lack of Mid & Senior level talent an issue for 60% of companies yet makes up only 20% of recruitment needs. Local Compensation rates are an issue. Average weekly wages have increased in the BC tech sector to the second highest in Canada. Salary competition from other jurisdictions is driving up local salaries and hindering recruitment from other major tech centres. Brain Drain is taking place. Approx. 30-50% of 2011 graduates in tech and engineering worked outside BC and Canada.
  18. 18. Examining Supply Source Challenges Challenges: Other Local Talent Career transitioners require retraining and upskilling initiatives to transition into the tech sector. Women represented only 15- 20% of BC's tech labour market from 2006 - 2015 -- lower than the Canadian average of 45%. Many demographic groups are underrepresented in the tech sector and must be better supported and trained to enter tech careers. First Nations aged 18 to 65 represented represented less than 1% of BC's workforce, as did individuals with disabilities.
  19. 19. Recap For each of the labour sources, there are large gaps between what BC is on track to produce and what is needed by the tech sector. Individualsenteringthe sector must possessa practicalblend of technicaland ‘soft’ skillsto provide valueto organizations. Meeting the accelerated employment demand of BC’s tech sector requires the following additions by 2021: 12,500 new entrants (graduates) to fill entry- level roles. 8,500 Immigrants to fill key senior-level or specialized roles. 9,500 other workers (reskilled workers, career transitioners, and under- represented groups) to fill key roles.
  20. 20. Increase the capacity of post-secondary programs to produce additional graduates eachyearintech-relevant programs as well as non-tech programs. Increase the supply of immigration and foreign workers for senior level and specialized roles. Increase investment in retraining initiatives, enabling the transition of local non-tech and underrepresented groups of workers to the tech sector. Increase investment and significantly expand co-op and experiential learning opportunities for all post-secondary and K-12 tech programs. Increase investment in pre- and post-arrival skills development programs for foreign talent. Our Call to Action
  21. 21. Thank You policy@wearebctech.com

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