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Understanding your-menstrual-cycle and body system

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This Slide Show Presentation is Pastor Derashay Zorn for LADY CARE COACHING. Learn how to manage your body and take care of yourself as a lady during menstrual cycle.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Understanding your-menstrual-cycle and body system

  1. 1. Me and My Period
  2. 2. WHAT IS A MENSTRUAL CYCLE
  3. 3. What is a Menstrual Cycle What is menstruation? Menstruation (men-STRAY-shuhn) is a woman's monthly bleeding. Most menstrual periods last from 3 to 5 days.
  4. 4. What is a Menstrual Cycle What is the menstrual cycle? When periods (menstruations) come regularly, this is called the menstrual cycle. Having regular menstrual cycles is a sign that important parts of your body are working normally. The menstrual cycle provides important body chemicals, called hormones, to keep you healthy. It also prepares your body for pregnancy each month. A cycle is counted from the first day of 1 period to the first day of the next period. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days long. Cycles can range anywhere from 21 to 35 days in adults and from 21 to 45 days in young teens.
  5. 5. COMMON MENSTRUAL PROBLEMS
  6. 6. Common menstrual problems • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) – hormonal events before a period can trigger a range of side effects in women at risk, including fluid retention, headaches, fatigue and irritability. • Dysmenorrhoea – or painful periods. It is thought that the uterus is prompted by certain hormones to squeeze harder than necessary to dislodge its lining. • Menorrhagia – or heavy menstrual flow. • Amenorrhoea – or absence of menstrual periods. This is considered abnormal, except during pre-puberty, pregnancy, lactation and menopause.
  7. 7. Common menstrual problems Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) • Diagnosis- No specific diagnostic test for PMS. Diagnosis relies on an examination of the woman’s medical history and description of the symptoms. • Risk Factors are weight, stress and smoking.
  8. 8. Common menstrual problems PMS Management There is no cure for PMS, the symptoms can be successfully managed. • lifestyle changes, • dietary modifications, • supplements, hormone treatments and other medications.
  9. 9. Common menstrual problems Lifestyle changes and PMS Recommended lifestyle changes include: • Exercise regularly • Don’t smoke. • Cut back on caffeine two weeks before menstruation. • Make sure you get enough sleep. • Manage your stress in whatever way works for you
  10. 10. Common menstrual problems Dietary changes for PMS Women experiencing PMS symptoms may crave high-fat and high-sugar foods like chocolate, biscuits and ice cream, and may consequently increase their food intake significantly. You can manage your weight and help reduce your PMS symptoms by making a few dietary changes. You might like to try: • eating smaller meals more often • reducing your intake of salty foods • including more fresh fruits and vegetables, and wholegrain foods in your daily diet • boosting your dairy food intake • not keeping high-fat and high-sugar foods in the house • making sure you always have tasty and healthy snack alternatives on hand
  11. 11. Common menstrual problems Supplements for PMS • Check with your doctor before taking any type of supplement, including herbal supplements, and make sure that you follow instructions on dosage. Medication and hormone treatments for PMS • A range of medications and hormone treatments are available to help you manage your symptoms.
  12. 12. Common menstrual problems Dysmenorrhoea – or painful periods. It is thought that the uterus is prompted by certain hormones to squeeze harder than necessary to dislodge its lining.
  13. 13. Common menstrual problems Dysmenorrhoea Symptoms of dysmenorrhoea can include: • pain low in the abdomen that can spread to the lower back and legs • pain that is gripping or experienced as a constant ache, or a combination of both. Typically: • the pain starts when the period starts, or earlier • the first 24 hours is the most painful • clots are passed in the menstrual blood. • Dysmenorrhoea can be associated with: • headaches • nausea and vomiting • digestive problems, such as diarrhoea or constipation • fainting • premenstrual symptoms, such as tender breasts and a swollen abdomen, which may continue throughout the period • pain continuing after the first 24 hours (this tends to subside after two or three days).
  14. 14. Common menstrual problems Dysmenorrhoea Treatment options can include: • bed rest during the first day or so of the period • applying heat, such as a hot water bottle, to the abdomen • pain-relieving medication • anti-inflammatory medication • regular exercise and attention to overall physical fitness • relaxation techniques • the oral combined contraceptive pill
  15. 15. Common menstrual problems Menorrhagia/ abnormal uterine bleeding – or heavy menstrual flow.
  16. 16. Common menstrual problems Symptoms of abnormal uterine bleeding Symptoms include: • heavy (more than 80 ml) or prolonged (more than eight days) blood loss during the menstrual period. • bleeding or spotting between periods (intermenstrual bleeding) • cramping and pain in the lower abdomen • fatigue.
  17. 17. Common menstrual problems Causes of abnormal uterine bleeding While in many cases, it is not possible to determine the exact cause, there are a number of reasons a woman may experience abnormal uterine bleeding. Some of the known causes of abnormal uterine bleeding include: spontaneous miscarriage in pregnancy • ectopic pregnancy • hormonal disorders • ovulatory dysfunction – • endometriosis • infection • medication • intrauterine device (IUD) • hormonal contraceptives • hormone replacement therapy • fibroids • polyps • bleeding disorders • cancer
  18. 18. Common menstrual problems Diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding The diagnosis and identification of potential causes of abnormal uterine bleeding involves a number of tests including: general examination • medical history • menstrual history • physical examination • pap test • blood tests • vaginal ultrasound • endometrial biopsy.
  19. 19. Common menstrual problems Treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding Treatment will depend on the cause, but may include: • medication • dilatation and curettage (D&C) • change of contraception • surgery • treatment of underlying disorders • hysterectomy
  20. 20. Common menstrual problems Amenorrhoea – or absence of menstrual periods. This is considered abnormal, except during pre-puberty, pregnancy, lactation and menopause.
  21. 21. Common menstrual problems Causes of amenorrhoea A range of factors can affect how the hypothalamus works and cause amenorrhoea, including: • emotional stress • losing weight • exercising too much • certain medication used to treat mental health conditions • disorders of the endocrine system, such as hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid gland). Some women are more at risk of amenorrhoea caused by stress and losing weight.
  22. 22. Common menstrual problems Diagnosis of amenorrhoea For a doctor to diagnose amenorrhoea, all other possible causes, such as certain reproductive disorders, need to be eliminated first. Tests can include: • pregnancy tests • physical examination • medical history • hormone tests • other scans, which can include CT scans and ultrasounds of the reproductive system.
  23. 23. Common menstrual problems Treatment for amenorrhoea Treatment for amenorrhoea depends on the cause.
  24. 24. HOW CAN SOMEONE MANAGE HER HEALTH AND BODY DURING THE PERIOD?
  25. 25. Sanitary protection • Pads • Tampons • Menstrual cups
  26. 26. Sanitary Protection Sanitary pads • Sanitary pads come in a variety of shapes and thicknesses to suit different flow types and situations (e.g. night time pads). • Pads generally need to be changed every three to four hours. • Regularly changing sanitary pad helps eliminate odors. As extend use of a product can cause orders to manifest when a product is soiled. • They should be wrapped and disposed of in a bin. • They cannot be flushed down the toilet as they will block the plumbing.
  27. 27. Sanitary Protection Tampons • Tampons are preferred by many women because they are comfortable to wear and convenient to use. • Tampons come in various sizes to suit different menstrual flows. Women should choose the minimum possible absorbency to suit their flow. • Tampons need to be changed every three to four hours. • Regularly changing tampon helps eliminate odors. As extend use of a product can cause orders to manifest when a product is soiled.
  28. 28. Sanitary Protection Menstrual cups • Menstrual cups are made of rubber or silicone and are worn inside the vagina to catch menstrual fluid. • Because they sit inside the vagina they can be worn when participating in activities such as swimming
  29. 29. WHY PARENTS FAILED IN TEACHING THEIR GIRLS ABOUT THEIR PERIOD?
  30. 30. Why Parents failed in Teaching their girls about their Period? • Fear • Discomfort • Lack of knowledge
  31. 31. Why Parents failed in Teaching their girls about their Period? Tips for Talking • Look for good books and videos or DVDs that can help foster a more comfortable and educational conversation. • Speak to your family doctor about ways to talk about menstruation and puberty. • Brush up on the facts of menstruation and have information readily available for your child to look at or read. • If there's a question that you don’t know the answer to, let your child know you will find out the information. • Coordinate your conversations with the health lessons and sex education your child receives in school. Ask your child's teacher about his or her plans and for any advice.
  32. 32. Why Parents failed in Teaching their girls about their Period? Tips for Talking • To break the ice, try asking your child some questions that will help you both ease into discussions. Ask what kind of questions he or she has while you walk down the feminine- hygiene products aisle at your grocery store or while you watch a commercial for pain relievers advertised to alleviate symptoms of PMS. • If you hear your child mention something related to getting a period, spur a conversation by asking where the information came from. Questions can be a great way to set the record straight on any misconceptions kids might have. • Before you take your preteen daughter for a routine checkup, let her know that the doctor may ask if she's gotten her period yet. You can then ask if she has any concerns or questions about getting her first period. • It's important to tell kids the truth about menstruation in an age-appropriate way and to be comfortable with the accuracy of that information. Don't be put off by their questions — they're probably the same questions you had at that age, and now you can answer them.
  33. 33. COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT PERIODS
  34. 34. Common Questions About Periods • Do girls have their periods for the rest of their lives? No, a woman stops having her period usually between the ages of 45 and 51, which means she will no longer be able to become pregnant • How long does a period last and how much blood is there? It varies for each girl, but some have their period for 3 days and others have it for a week. Periods can be light, moderate, or heavy, and there can be a total of 2-4 tablespoons (30-59 milliliters) of blood. And this can vary from period to period in the same girl. • Are pads or tampons better? In choosing between the two, what matters is a girl's physical and emotional comfort.
  35. 35. Common Questions About Periods • Do girls have to stop playing sports or swimming while they have their periods? Girls should understand they can do everything they normally would do — as long as they're comfortable. For example, girls may choose to wear a tampon so they can continue to swim while menstruating.
  36. 36. PMS Diary • PMS Dairy can be very useful for tracking your period, moods, food intake, cravings, etc. • Recording your period can give doctors more insight on your activities during your period to aid them in providing medical advice and diagnoses. • Record your food choices in your PMS diary – charting your food intake may help you become more aware of high-fat and high-sugar snacking. • Record you mood – charting your mood can assist with diagnoses of PMS

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