Eng2281 session 1 b ed(el)

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Eng2281 session 1 b ed(el)

  1. 1. BA(ENG) and BEd(ENG EDU) / BEd(EL) Year 4 Elective Module ENG2281 Integrating Information Technology in the ESL Classroom Session 1 Introduction & Designing a WebQuest Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. Some basic terms <ul><li>IT </li></ul><ul><li>IT ( I nformation T echnology), also known as ICT ( I nformation and C ommunication T echnology) deals with the use of electronic computers and computer software to convert, store, protect, process, transmit, and retrieve information . </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  3. 3. Some basic terms <ul><li>CAI </li></ul><ul><li>C omputer- A ssisted I nstruction or C omputer- A ided I nstruction </li></ul><ul><li>CALL </li></ul><ul><li>CALL ( C omputer- A ssisted L anguage L earning) includes any process in which a learner uses a computer and, as a result, improves his or her language (Beatty, 2003, p. 7). </li></ul><ul><li>CAL </li></ul><ul><li>CAL ( C omputer- A ssisted L earning) refers to the learning of any subject using a computer (Beatty, 2003, p. 9). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  4. 4. Why use computers? <ul><li>Computers are playing an increasingly important role in second and foreign language teaching and learning. </li></ul><ul><li>The digital format of audio, video, images and texts ( multimedia ) enables students to access authentic target language materials (Szendeffy, 2005). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  5. 5. Other rationale for IT <ul><li>There is a great amount of authentic materials appropriate for language learning in the Internet. </li></ul><ul><li>A principal purpose behind using IT in the classroom is to develop students’ IT capabilities (Bennett, 2004 ) . Students can learn some useful skills such as word processing and effective Internet browsing which are helpful to their continuing academic work, careers and personal lives (Szendeffy, 2005). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  6. 6. Other rationale for IT <ul><li>IT enhances students’ motivation and enjoyment, and increases concentration and time spent on tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>By use of carefully structured computer-based activities, students’ higher-order skills and knowledge can be enhanced (Bennett, 2004). </li></ul><ul><li>The computer can offer interactive learning. It can ‘assess’ the student’s response and give appropriate feedback instantaneously (Ahmad, Corbett, Rogers, & Sussex, 1985). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  7. 7. Other rationale for IT <ul><li>It is flexible. Provided a computer is available, a student can come at any time and work at the speed best suited to him/her (Ahmad, Corbett, Rogers, & Sussex, 1985). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  8. 8. Are there any disadvantages of using computers? Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  9. 9. Learner’s skills which can be practiced in a CALL environment Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved. Production Reception Written Yes (writing) Yes (reading) Spoken No (speaking) Yes (listening)
  10. 10. Learner’s skills which can be practiced in a CALL environment <ul><li>It is an essential characteristic of a language that it is primarily a spoken medium. This is obviously a problem for the computer since its ability to deal with speech is far less developed than its ability to deal with written signals. </li></ul><ul><li>It is not possible to require the computer to ‘understand’ or ‘interpret’ the spoken input from the learner. </li></ul><ul><li>Nevertheless, students can still practice listening skills (Ahmad, Corbett, Rogers, & Sussex, 1985). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  11. 11. Value of computers in language learning <ul><li>Two modes of use: Computers as tutor vs. tool </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  12. 12. Computers as tutor <ul><li>A computer is used as a tutor in the absence of a teacher, for example, in a self-access lab or at home. </li></ul><ul><li>It provides learning content and exercises, guides the student and gives feedback (Szendeffy, 2005). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  13. 13. Computers as tool <ul><li>Teacher uses computers in class as tools for some collaborative projects that encourage student-student or student-teacher interaction (Szendeffy, 2005). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  14. 14. The teacher’s roles <ul><li>Do you think if the teachers will be replaced by computers? </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  15. 15. The teacher’s roles <ul><li>Szendeffy (2005, p. 7) believes that far from being replaced by computers, teachers actually take on more responsibilities in a CALL environment than in a teacher-centred class. </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  16. 16. The teacher’s roles <ul><li>The responsibilities of the teacher include to: </li></ul><ul><li>arrange project- or task-oriented activities which emphasize student-student interaction; </li></ul><ul><li>teach students effective use of computer applications; </li></ul><ul><li>train students to think critically; </li></ul><ul><li>encourage an environment where students seek help from their peers before seeking help from the teacher; and </li></ul><ul><li>act as a facilitator to facilitate students’ learning (Szendeffy, 2005). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  17. 17. Traditional vs. facilitator role Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved. Teacher’s Role Traditional Role Facilitator Role Design Use lectures and/or demonstrations to present information to students Create activities for students to practice the content Create problems for students to solve Create activities that require students to discover the content Implementation Direct all learning activities Guide learning activities Facilitation Oversee students’ work Facilitate students’ learning
  18. 18. Language focused computer applications <ul><li>Can you think of some commonly used language focused computer applications? </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  19. 19. Language focused computer applications <ul><li>Word processing </li></ul><ul><li>Educational software (CD-ROMs) </li></ul><ul><li>Presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Internet (Web 1.0 and Web 2.0) </li></ul><ul><li>Corpora </li></ul><ul><li>Computer-mediated communication (e.g. Skype) </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  20. 20. Questions for Discussion <ul><li>Do you think it is important to use IT in English teaching? Why/Why not? </li></ul><ul><li>Think about your previous teaching (practice) experience. Did you often use IT in your teaching? What applications did you frequently use? </li></ul><ul><li>What IT skills do you think English teachers need to be able to integrate IT into teaching effectively? </li></ul><ul><li>In what ways do you think IT might help young learners learn English more effectively? </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  21. 21. Designing a WebQuest Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  22. 22. What is a WebQuest? <ul><li>A WebQuest is an activity in which students utilize World Wide Web resources to obtain information that is then used in a group project. </li></ul><ul><li>It is designed to help students use their time well , to focus on using information rather than looking for it, and to support students ' thinking at the levels of analysis , synthesis and evaluation . </li></ul><ul><li>It help s ensure that students stay on task while online. </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  23. 23. What is a WebQuest? <ul><li>The WebQuest can consist of a single class session or a whole teaching unit. </li></ul><ul><li>The lessons consist of materials selected by the teachers and used by the students. </li></ul><ul><li>WebQuest can be done on a variety of topics that are not well defined and that require creativity and problem solving skills. </li></ul><ul><li>WebQuests are not meant to prompt simple recall but foster inquiry and logical constructivism incorporating collaborative learning (Sharp, 2009). </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  24. 24. The building blocks of a WebQuest <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Task(s) </li></ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  25. 25. The building blocks of a WebQuest <ul><li>The Introduction orients students and captures their interests. </li></ul><ul><li>The Task(s) describe(s) the activity’s end product. </li></ul><ul><li>The Process explains the strategies students need to complete the task(s). </li></ul><ul><li>The Resources are the websites students will use to complete the task(s). </li></ul><ul><li>The Evaluation measures the results of the activity. </li></ul><ul><li>The Conclusion sums up the activity and encourages students to reflect on its process and results. </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  26. 26. The WebQuest design process <ul><li>Choose a topic </li></ul><ul><li>Select a design </li></ul><ul><li>Create assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Develop the process </li></ul><ul><li>Put it all together </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate the WebQuest </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  27. 27. The WebQuest design process <ul><li>Choose a topic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What do you want to teach? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Select a design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example, using some ready-made WebQuest templates. </li></ul></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  28. 28. The WebQuest design process <ul><li>Create assessments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe how students will be evaluated. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Develop the process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-select quality websites that will be useful for your students as they complete the task(s). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Help students in understanding and organizing information. </li></ul></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  29. 29. The WebQuest design process <ul><li>Put it all together </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bring all the WebQuest elements together. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Evaluate the WebQuest </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Assess your WebQuest by using a rubric. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate the WebQuest before using it in the classroom. For example, do the links work? </li></ul></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  30. 30. Creating a rubric <ul><li>What is a rubric? </li></ul><ul><li>Rubrics are assessment instruments that help teachers communicate their expectations to students and focus on important criteria as they grade. </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  31. 31. Useful WebQuest links <ul><li>WebQuest.Org </li></ul><ul><li>http://webquest.org/index.php </li></ul><ul><li>WebQuest Resource Bank </li></ul><ul><li>http://course.fed.cuhk.edu.hk/community/webquest/ </li></ul><ul><li>WebQuest Templates </li></ul><ul><li>http://webquest.sdsu.edu/LessonTemplate.html </li></ul><ul><li>Rubric Template </li></ul><ul><li>http://edweb.sdsu.edu/triton/july/rubrics/Rubric_Template.html </li></ul><ul><li>A Rubric for Evaluating WebQuests </li></ul><ul><li>http://webquest.sdsu.edu/webquestrubric.html </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  32. 32. Task - Designing a language focused WebQuest <ul><li>Work in groups of 3 or 4. </li></ul><ul><li>Design and develop a language focused WebQuest for a class of primary / secondary school students. </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.
  33. 33. References <ul><li>Ahmad, K., Corbett, G., Rogers, M., & Sussex, R. (1985). Computers, language learning and language teaching . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Beatty, K. (2003) . Teaching and researching computer-assisted language learning . London: Longman. </li></ul><ul><li>Bennett, R. (2004). Using ICT in primary English teaching . Exeter, England: Learning Matters. </li></ul><ul><li>Sharp, V. F. (2009). Computer education for teachers: Integrating technology into classroom teaching (6 th ed). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley. </li></ul><ul><li>Szendeffy, J. (2005). A practical guide to using computers in language teaching . Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press . </li></ul>Prepared by Ms. Ruby Yang, Department of English, HKIEd. All rights reserved.

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