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Plagiarism 1 
Plagiarism and 
Correct Documentation 
by 
Karey Perkins
Plagiarism 2 
What is “plagiarism”? 
It is presenting other’s work, words, or ideas as 
your own, or documenting such work...
Plagiarism 3 Author’s unique ideas (must cite) 
vs. 
Common knowledge (don’t cite) 
Author’s unique ideas (must cite) 
 I...
Plagiarism 4 
Pop Quiz 1: Which statements below are common 
knowledge? Why or why not? 
1. Sugar causes tooth decay in ch...
Plagiarism 5 
Transferring information from 
your source to your paper 
When you put another’s work, words, or ideas withi...
Plagiarism 6 
QUOTES 
 Convey your author’s ideas in the AUTHOR’S words, not your 
own words. 
 ALL word-for-word interp...
Plagiarism 7 Quote the author EXACTLY 
 Quote EXACTLY (word-for-word, punctuation for punctuation). 
 If you subtract un...
Plagiarism 8 
WHEN to quote 
 quote sparingly, usually no more than 10-15% of your 
citations 
 quote if author has said...
Plagiarism 9 
PARAPHRASES 
 convey your author’s ideas in YOUR own words, not his 
 keep the same amount of information ...
Plagiarism 10 
SUMMARIES 
Same as paraphrase: completely in your own words EXCEPT 
 condense the author’s message 
 conv...
Plagiarism 11 
Formatting in-text citations 
 Citations give credit to your source IN THE MIDDLE OF 
YOUR PAPER. 
 They ...
Plagiarism 12 
In-text citation for a PARAPHRASE 
Blah, blah, blah (Author’s last name, year). 
Example: 
Global warming i...
Plagiarism 13 
In-text citation for a QUOTE 
The PAGE NUMBER is required for direct quotations 
only. 
“Blah, blah, blah” ...
Plagiarism 14 
Review of basic APA in-text citation 
In-text citation of a PARAPHRASE: 
Blah, blah, blah (Smith, 2006). 
I...
Plagiarism 15 In-text Citation of Internet Sources 
NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, 
NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, 
NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, 
NEVE...
Plagiarism 16 
Citing Internet Sources 
PARAPHRASES 
 The Internet source will often have an AUTHOR, (so use 
author’s na...
Plagiarism 17 
Citing Internet Sources 
QUOTES 
There is ONE difference between in-text citations of Internet 
sources and...
Plagiarism 18 
Formatting the Title Page: Example 
New Computer Users 1 
RUNNING HEAD: New Computer Users 
New Computer Us...
Plagiarism 19 
THE REFERENCES PAGE 
Now that you know how to format your in-text 
citations and your paper in general, let...
Plagiarism 20 
The References Page (your bibliography) 
 A References page is REQUIRED or you will receive a zero 
on you...
Plagiarism 21 
Formatting the References Page 
 Put all entries in ALPHABETICAL ORDER by author’s last name or 
shortened...
Plagiarism 22 
Titles 
 Underline OR Italicize titles of LONG WORKS 
 Quote titles of SHORT WORKS 
 What is a short wor...
Plagiarism 23 
When to Underline, Italicize, or Quote Titles 
UNDERLINE or ITALICIZE 
titles of Long Works: 
 Books 
 Pl...
Plagiarism 24 
References page entry for a BOOK 
For a book with one author: 
Author’s last name, first initial. (Date). 
...
Plagiarism 25 
References page entry for a 
NEWSPAPER or MAGAZINE ARTICLE 
For a newspaper article: 
Broad, W. J. (1999, N...
References page entries for Plagiarism 26 
INTERNET SOURCES 
 With the web, you try to approximate as print citations as ...
Plagiarism 27 
References 
Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997). Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. 
N...
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Plagiarism and Correct Documentation (Citing)

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Plagiarism and Correct Documentation (Citing)

  1. 1. Plagiarism 1 Plagiarism and Correct Documentation by Karey Perkins
  2. 2. Plagiarism 2 What is “plagiarism”? It is presenting other’s work, words, or ideas as your own, or documenting such work incorrectly, whether intentional or not intentional. There are four kinds or levels of plagiarism:  Cheating or Stealing  Lying and Falsifying  Plagiarism due to Laziness, Confusion, Carelessness  Inadvertent Plagiarism
  3. 3. Plagiarism 3 Author’s unique ideas (must cite) vs. Common knowledge (don’t cite) Author’s unique ideas (must cite)  Information that the author has researched herself  Information that the author has discovered (his own experiments, etc.) himself  Thoughts, insights, opinions, and ideas of the author that are original to that author  Author’s own synthesis of other’s information or own conclusions from other’s information Common knowledge (don’t cite)  Information that appears in multiple sources  Information that most educated people know, though they may have to remind themselves by checking a reference book  You may not already know the information before you find it in your source, but if it conforms to one of the above criteria, it is still common knowledge
  4. 4. Plagiarism 4 Pop Quiz 1: Which statements below are common knowledge? Why or why not? 1. Sugar causes tooth decay in children and adults. 2. The earth is 93.2 million miles from the sun. 3. It seems that the majority of people find their solutions to problems or puzzles not through labored and sequential logical calculations, but through an “aha! experience”. 4. Universal grammatical rules do not originate in any brain location or through a genetic determination, but rather, they emerge spontaneously and evolve through adaptation. 5. Elephants are mammals of the pachyderm family of the Proboscidea order, and only three living species remain.
  5. 5. Plagiarism 5 Transferring information from your source to your paper When you put another’s work, words, or ideas within the text of your paper, you may QUOTE PARAPHRASE SUMMARIZE
  6. 6. Plagiarism 6 QUOTES  Convey your author’s ideas in the AUTHOR’S words, not your own words.  ALL word-for-word interpretations MUST BE IN QUOTATION MARKS. (“ ”)  In in-text citations for quotes, you need page numbers in addition to author and year: (Smith, 1999, p. 45).
  7. 7. Plagiarism 7 Quote the author EXACTLY  Quote EXACTLY (word-for-word, punctuation for punctuation).  If you subtract unnecessary words, use an ellipses (3 dots) (…) Have a period after the ellipses if it is at end of sentence (4 dots) (….) “He [President Bush] cited numerous reasons for a troop surge…. Chief among them was the need to ‘win’ in Iraq” (Jones, 2007, p. A1).
  8. 8. Plagiarism 8 WHEN to quote  quote sparingly, usually no more than 10-15% of your citations  quote if author has said something  Uniquely worded  Technical and difficult to translate  Something you will object to or refute  Speaker is famous or has special authority  don’t begin or end paragraph with a quote
  9. 9. Plagiarism 9 PARAPHRASES  convey your author’s ideas in YOUR own words, not his  keep the same amount of information and detail – the passage in your paper should be same length and text space as the passage in your source  do not skip points  do not insert your own ideas  only after you cite the paraphrase will you then add your comments
  10. 10. Plagiarism 10 SUMMARIES Same as paraphrase: completely in your own words EXCEPT  condense the author’s message  convey author’s ideas in shorter form, with less detail  just convey the major concepts  sum up author’s main points
  11. 11. Plagiarism 11 Formatting in-text citations  Citations give credit to your source IN THE MIDDLE OF YOUR PAPER.  They go immediately AFTER the information from your source that you used.  They go BEFORE the punctuation (usually a period, sometimes a semi-colon or comma).  They ALWAYS have a corresponding References page (bibliography) entry.  Basic APA style has the following: parenthesis, author’s last name, comma, year, close parenthesis, period or comma or semicolon, as in: Blah, blah, blah (Williams, 2003).
  12. 12. Plagiarism 12 In-text citation for a PARAPHRASE Blah, blah, blah (Author’s last name, year). Example: Global warming is increasing the earth’s temperature by an average of 1 degree every 500 years (Smith, 1999).
  13. 13. Plagiarism 13 In-text citation for a QUOTE The PAGE NUMBER is required for direct quotations only. “Blah, blah, blah” (Author’s last name, year, p. #). Example: Some scientists believe that “without aggressive intervention in systems of present energy use, the beaches of Florida will be underwater by the year 2500” (Smith, 1999, p. 54).
  14. 14. Plagiarism 14 Review of basic APA in-text citation In-text citation of a PARAPHRASE: Blah, blah, blah (Smith, 2006). In-text citation of a QUOTE: “Blah, blah, blah” (Smith, 2006, p. 45). Alternate in-text citation placement for a PARAPHRASE: Smith (2006) believes yadda, yadda, yadda. Alternate in-text citation placement for a QUOTE: According to Smith (2006), “Yadda, yadda, yadda” (p. 45).
  15. 15. Plagiarism 15 In-text Citation of Internet Sources NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, NEVER use the Internet web address (http://www.etc.etc.com) in your in-text citation!!!!!!!**
  16. 16. Plagiarism 16 Citing Internet Sources PARAPHRASES  The Internet source will often have an AUTHOR, (so use author’s name as in your other sources): Blah, blah, blah (Taylor, 2007).  If your Internet source doesn’t have an author, use a SHORTENED TITLE of the web source (the page, not the whole site): Blah, blah, blah (“Women’s Health,” 2007).
  17. 17. Plagiarism 17 Citing Internet Sources QUOTES There is ONE difference between in-text citations of Internet sources and print sources: If you QUOTE an Internet source, use PARAGRAPH numbers (yes, you must count them), not page numbers: “Blah, blah, blah” (Taylor, 2007, para. 6).
  18. 18. Plagiarism 18 Formatting the Title Page: Example New Computer Users 1 RUNNING HEAD: New Computer Users New Computer Users and Fear: A Review of Some Related Literature Samantha Smith Psychology 101, Semester 2, Class 3A Professor H. Lawson May 2, 2006 FROM: Shaun Fawcett’s Writing Help Central. Retrieved March 5, 2007 from http://www.writinghelp-central.com/apa-sample1.html
  19. 19. Plagiarism 19 THE REFERENCES PAGE Now that you know how to format your in-text citations and your paper in general, let’s look at how to write your bibliography, the list of all your sources at the END of your paper. In APA style it is called: REFERENCES
  20. 20. Plagiarism 20 The References Page (your bibliography)  A References page is REQUIRED or you will receive a zero on your paper.  That doesn’t mean you don’t have to have IN-TEXT CITATIONS – they are also REQUIRED or you will still receive a zero.  EACH IN-TEXT CITATION must have a corresponding or matching REFERENCES PAGE ENTRY.  List ALL sources you used (“referred” to) when you wrote your paper.  Compile the list as you go, not at the end of your project.  Use APA format at DeVry (discussed below).
  21. 21. Plagiarism 21 Formatting the References Page  Put all entries in ALPHABETICAL ORDER by author’s last name or shortened title if no author.  The word “References” goes at top of first reference page. References Bedford, F. (1990, October 30). The psychology of fear: Is it all in our heads? The New York Times, p. B4. Chrissie, S. (1995, July 31). Are we afraid of our computers? The Chicago Tribune, pp. D4, D6. Gorman, J.R., & Smithson, R.T. (1997). The dynamics of human fear neuroses in the age of the modern computer (pp. 345-353). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  22. 22. Plagiarism 22 Titles  Underline OR Italicize titles of LONG WORKS  Quote titles of SHORT WORKS  What is a short work? What is a long work?
  23. 23. Plagiarism 23 When to Underline, Italicize, or Quote Titles UNDERLINE or ITALICIZE titles of Long Works:  Books  Plays  Movies  Newspapers  Magazines or journals  TV shows QUOTE titles of “Short Works”:  A poem, essay, or selection from a book  An article in a newspaper  An article in a magazine  An episode of a TV show
  24. 24. Plagiarism 24 References page entry for a BOOK For a book with one author: Author’s last name, first initial. (Date). Title of book. City Published: Publisher. Didion, J. (1997). A book of common prayer. New York: Simon & Schuster.
  25. 25. Plagiarism 25 References page entry for a NEWSPAPER or MAGAZINE ARTICLE For a newspaper article: Broad, W. J. (1999, November 21). Nuclear roulette for Russia: Burying uncontained waste. The New York Times, p. A1. For a magazine article: Winson, J. (2002, June). The meaning of dreams. Scientific American, 12, 54-61.
  26. 26. References page entries for Plagiarism 26 INTERNET SOURCES  With the web, you try to approximate as print citations as closely as you can.  Try to find an author, an article title, the magazine or main site from which it comes from. You may have to search around the site.  At the end of the entry, you have the DATE OF RETRIEVAL, or when YOU accessed the web page and found the information. Therefore, you will have TWO dates in your entry.  You also will have the FULL WEB ADDRESS, of the web page or file.  So, you have an entry that looks just like a regular print entry, followed by: Retrieved March 1, 2007, from http://kareyperkins.com/classes/112/112links.html
  27. 27. Plagiarism 27 References Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997). Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York: HarperPerennial. Deacon, T. (1997). The symbolic species: The Co-evolution of language and the brain. New York: Norton. Degelman, Douglas. (2006). APA Style Essentials. Retrieved March 6, 2007 from: http://www.vanguard.edu/faculty/ddegelman/ DeVry/Alpharetta COLL 147/149 Resource Notebook. (2004). General Education Department. Alpharetta, GA: DeVry University. Fawcett, Shaun. (2007). Writing Help Central. Retrieved March 2, 5, 2007 from http://www.writinghelp-central.com Glenn, C., Miller, R.K., Webb, S.S., and Gray, L. (2004). The Writer’s Harbrace Handbook, 2nd ed. Boston: Thomson. Goleman, D. (1995). Emotional intelligence. New York: Bantam. Troyka, L. Q. (2002). Simon & Schuster handbook for writers, 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

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