Rotary's Areas of Focus_2014 Rotaract Preconvention

1,320 views

Published on

0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,320
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
90
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Rotary's Areas of Focus_2014 Rotaract Preconvention

  1. 1. ROTARY’S AREAS OF FOCUS Alberto Cecchini (Rotarian, Italy; Rotaract & Interact Committee Chair) Yvonne Kwan (Rotaractor, USA)
  2. 2. OBJECTIVES • LEARN WHAT THE SIX AREAS OFFOCUS ARE • DISCOVER REAL PROJECTSHAPPENING INEACH OFTHESE CATEGORIES • LEARN WHERE TOFIND RESOURCES TOSUPPORT THESE NEEDS LOCALLYANDINTERNATIONALLY • UNDERSTAND FUTUREVISION AND WHYROTARY PROMOTEDTHIS CHANGE
  3. 3. PEACE AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION/PREVENTION RESPONDING TO CONFLICT: • 6,000 civilians are maimed or killed by land mines each year • 42 million people are currently displaced by armed conflict or persecution • 90% of casualties in armed conflicts are civilians, and at least half are children • 300,000 child soldiers (boys and girls under age 18) are believed to be involved in conflicts around the world
  4. 4. PEACE AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION/PREVENTION WHAT YOU CAN DO: • Help children who have been orphaned, injured, or traumatized by conflict • Pursue projects that address the underlying causes of conflict: disease, illiteracy, hunger, and poverty • Participate in fellowship and service activities with other Rotary clubs in other parts of the world to promote understanding and peace
  5. 5. DISEASE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT DISEASE PREVENTION AND HEALTH CARE: • 1 billion people suffer from neglected tropical disease such as dengue fever and leprosy each year • 1 in 6 people worldwide cannot pay for health care • 100 million people are pushed into poverty each year because of medical costs • 57 countries have fewer than 23 health workers for every 10,000 people • 4.3 million doctors, nurses, midwives, and other skilled caregivers are needed worldwide
  6. 6. DISEASE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT WHAT YOU CAN DO: • Support health education programs that explain how diseases are spread and promote ways to reduce the risk of transmission • Carry out immunizations against infectious diseases • Sponsor continuing education and training for health workers, including scholarships, stipends, and public recognition
  7. 7. WATER ANDSANITATION SANITATION AND HYGIENE: • 2.6 billion people lack access to adequate sanitation facilities • 6,000 children die each day from diarrheal diseases caused by lack of sanitation and unsafe water
  8. 8. WATER ANDSANITATION WHAT YOU CAN DO: • Promote good hygiene habits through education. Proper handwashing, with soap and water, can reduce diarrhea diseases by up to 45%. • Implement rainwater harvesting systems to collect and store rainwater for drinking, irrigation, or recharging underground aquifiers • Build water wells to extract groundwater from underground aquifiers • Provide point of use home water filters, such as ceramic or sand filters, to make drinking water safe
  9. 9. MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH CHILD HEALTH CARE, ANTENATAL CARE AND CHILDBIRTH, AND FAMILY PLANNING: • 9 million children under the age of five die each year due to malnutrition, poor health care, and inadequate sanitation • 1 in 22 women will die during pregnancy and childbirth in Africa • 80% of maternal deaths could be prevented with access to reproductive health services and trained health care workers • 40% of women in developing countries do not use contraception • 53 million unintended pregnancies could be prevented through family planning
  10. 10. MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH WHAT YOU CAN DO: • Provide immunizations and antibiotics • Promote good nutrition • Provide birthing kits to health professionals • Provide access to family planning information and resources
  11. 11. BASIC EDUCATION AND LITERACY TEACHER TRAINING AND SUPPORTING STUDENTS: • 31% of secondary school teachers in low- income countries are not professionally trained • 75 million children worldwide – 41 million of them girls – have no access to education • 677 million people over the age of 15 are illiterate
  12. 12. BASIC EDUCATION AND LITERACY WHAT YOU CAN DO: • Provide teacher training, curriculum, and/or supplies for schools • Send a vocational training team to offer curriculum development training in rural communities • Develop an adult literacy program • Serve as a mentor to students in your community
  13. 13. ECONOMICAND COMMUNITYDEVELOPMENT JOB CREATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP: • 1.4 billion people – nearly half of them employed – live on less than US$1.25 a day
  14. 14. ECONOMICAND COMMUNITYDEVELOPMENT WHAT YOU CAN DO: • Provide equipment or supplies to a cooperative to increase production and sales in the local market • Send a vocational training team to teach business leaders in developing countries how to create a business plan and maintain accurate financial accounting • Expand vocational training opportunities, including job placement programming, at local nonprofit organizations
  15. 15. WHAT IS FUTURE VISION?
  16. 16. FUTURE VISION BACKGROUND • 1917: The Rotary Foundation was created with one simple goal – “To do good in the world.” • 1947: The Foundation awarded its first grants in the form of ambassadorial scholarships to 18 Rotary Fellows • 1965: TRF launched Global Study Exchange (GSE) and Matching Grant programs to focus on international humanitarian, vocational, and cultural efforts of Rotarians. By initial design, Matching Grants were intended to support relatively small, one-time projects. • By 2004, the Foundation was making more than 4,000 grants per year, with matching grants growing at an unsustainable rate.
  17. 17. FUTURE VISION BACKGROUND We were still “doing good in the world,” but… • The Foundation’s grant business had become a confusing and frustrating maze, inefficient, and expensive to operate, with a dozen different grants, each with their own rules, funding, and processes. • In 2005-06, TRF was using only 20% of its program awards to fund grants with clearly defined high-impact, sustainable activities. The rest – the other 80% of the grant projects – were not quite hitting the target. Many of them met real needs, but they had limited, short-lived impact. • Was our Foundation getting the greatest return on donors’ investments? • The Foundation had to look at new ways of doing good in the world.
  18. 18. AND SO, FUTURE VISION WAS BORN MANY ROTARY GROUPS PARTICIPATED IN DEVELOPING IT
  19. 19. THE GOALS OF FUTURE VISION • Simplify and streamline TRF’s grant activities and their rules and processes • Create bigger projects that have lasting, sustainable impacts, help more people, and provide greater support for Rotary’s public image • Empower Rotarians by giving them greater flexibility in their grant activities • Align and focus Rotarian service efforts within the six Areas of Focus
  20. 20. FUTURE VISION: TYPES OF GRANTS • To make the system easier to use, the number of grant types have been reduced from 12 to 3: 1. District grants 2. Global grants 3. Packaged grants • These are in addition to PolioPlus and Rotary Peace Centers programs, which are still top priorities for TRF and will continue as currently structured
  21. 21. FUTURE VISION: DISTRICT GRANTS • District grants are issued annually in a lump sum to the district, based on submission of simple spending plan • They offer flexibility because: • They support short-term activities that can be either local or international • The projects they fund must align with the Foundation’s mission but don’t have to conform to the six Areas of Focus • They can include cultural and fellowship exchanges by individuals and groups similar to a traditional group study exchange
  22. 22. FUTURE VISION: GLOBAL GRANTS • Global grants were designed to focus the majority of TRF resources on larger, more sustainable projects that fall within the six Areas of Focus • Global grants are supported by a minimum match from the World Fund of US$15,000, which means that the minimum project cost is US$30,000 • Global grants are international, requiring a partnership between a host club or a district and at least one club or district across borders • Global grants must be sustainable, which means they are designed and implemented so that the benefiting community can maintain long-term solutions to community needs after grant funding ends
  23. 23. FUTURE VISION: PACKAGEDGRANTS • Packaged grants build on Rotary’s tradition of partnering with other organizations to pool resources and expertise in order to achieve greater impact • Packaged grant projects: • Are planned and implemented by Rotarians • Require no financial commitment by the project sponsors • Provide a way for small clubs with limited resources to become involved with the Foundation
  24. 24. NOW IT’S YOUR TURN!
  25. 25. QUESTIONS? a.cecchini@mclink.it yvonne@kwanlegends.com ALBERTO CECCHINI YVONNE KWAN @yvonnekwansays TALK TO US!

×