2014 ROTARY INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION
Introducing ShelterBox
SchoolBoxes and Young
ShelterBox
• Welcome and introductions
• Impact of learning on emergencies
• SchoolBoxes
• Young ShelterBox
• Q & A
Agenda
• Elizabeth Furner | Rotary Club of Mount
Gambier West, SA, Australia - Moderator
• Becky Maynard | ShelterBox, Director o...
“We are hard wired
for emotional
connection”
Our earliest
relationships build the
brain structures we use
for lifelong relating to
others.
Limbic system is the
seat of...
“Nine-year-olds are coming to the swings armed: that's
a serious issue that we have to deal with every day...
Your brain c...
Neurobiology of profound stress
• Profound stress is a prolonged & at times
overwhelming threat to the physical or psychol...
Neurobiology of profound stress
(continued)
• Limbic overload
• Survival mode
• Detachment
Survivor mode
A human state of being where the mind & the body take an instinctive
response to survive, especially after f...
Being overloaded
• Difficulty remembering new information
• Difficulty learning
• Loss of ability to empathize
• Higher ra...
Percentages of understanding
Individuals living in a
safe environment
Individuals living
in
15% LISTENING 3%
45% BODY LANG...
Why do PSS?
• To make children safe and connected
• To build secure attachments for children (safety,
protection and emoti...
Psychosocial circles
Community Society
functioning
Child Family
functioning
Psychological Feelings
Thoughts
Behaviours/ski...
Basic services and security
Community and family supports
Specialised
services
Focused non-specialised
supports
Mental hea...
TAKE ACTION, EXCHANGE IDEAS, JOIN LEADERS
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
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Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox

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Did you know that ShelterBox distributes educational
supplies and stationery in addition to emergency
shelter and vital aid to communities affected by disaster
and humanitarian crisis? ShelterBox representatives
and Rotarian volunteers will discuss ShelterBox’s
educational program and opportunities for Rotarians,
Rotaractors, and Interactors to work with ShelterBox
locally and abroad.

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  • Stress is a normal response to a physical or emotional challenge and occurs when demands are out of balance with our resources for coping.

    There are different kinds of stress. Day to day stress (which can sometimes be a useful baseline) based on daily difficulties and challenges. Cumulative stress occurs when stress continues over time. And profound stress (which is critical stress) which are situations where individuals experienced such heightened stress that they detach from themselves, their bodies and the people around them.

    Children’s reactions to emergencies will vary according to the type of emergency, their experience of the emergency, their own skills and capacities and the support that people receive from those around them.

  • Anger signals your body to prepare for a fight. This reaction is commonly classified as "fight or flight." When you get angry, adrenaline and other hormones are released into the bloodstream. Then your blood pressure goes up, your heart beats faster, and you breathe faster.

    Anger and constant hostility keep your blood pressure high , increase the adrenaline flow to your brain, and increase your chances of having other health problems, depression, sleeplessness and prolonged anxiety.

    A human state of being where the mind and the body take an instinctive response to survive، especially after facing life threatening danger and continual fear.


  • Makes our world contract

  • The levels of giving and receiving information is influenced by level of profound stress that people are experiencing – and there overall sense of security.

    The ability to receive and process information are influenced by past experiences, cultural context etc.

    People rarely understand information or interpret communication from others at 100% - even those in safe environments.

    Language – talking is sometimes the least effective way of communicating.
  • April 22, 2009
  • Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox

    1. 1. 2014 ROTARY INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION Introducing ShelterBox SchoolBoxes and Young ShelterBox
    2. 2. • Welcome and introductions • Impact of learning on emergencies • SchoolBoxes • Young ShelterBox • Q & A Agenda
    3. 3. • Elizabeth Furner | Rotary Club of Mount Gambier West, SA, Australia - Moderator • Becky Maynard | ShelterBox, Director of Fundraising & Communications; Rotary Club of Cober Valley Helston - Panelist • Melissa Martins Casagrande | ShelterBox, International Partnerships Manager - Panelist • Amy Lamoin | UNICEF Australia, Advocacy Manager – Panelist Presenters
    4. 4. “We are hard wired for emotional connection”
    5. 5. Our earliest relationships build the brain structures we use for lifelong relating to others. Limbic system is the seat of all of our emotional learning.
    6. 6. “Nine-year-olds are coming to the swings armed: that's a serious issue that we have to deal with every day... Your brain changes. Your ability to assess risk goes. You can’t listen and you can’t learn. What we have to do is reconnect these kids' neuropathways to their emotional brain. Otherwise we're going to lose this generation”. Jane MacPhail, UNICEF Jordan, 2014 in NYT.
    7. 7. Neurobiology of profound stress • Profound stress is a prolonged & at times overwhelming threat to the physical or psychological wholeness of a person. • “We are not crazy. What we feel is not abnormal. The situation is crazy and abnormal” (Young person, Bosnia 2005) • Normal reaction to an abnormal situation.
    8. 8. Neurobiology of profound stress (continued) • Limbic overload • Survival mode • Detachment
    9. 9. Survivor mode A human state of being where the mind & the body take an instinctive response to survive, especially after facing life threatening danger & continual fear. • Hyper-arousal • Fight/flight/freeze • High risk taking behaviour • De-sensitization • No ability to assess personal risk/risk for others • Limited ability to empathize with others
    10. 10. Being overloaded • Difficulty remembering new information • Difficulty learning • Loss of ability to empathize • Higher rates of depression and anxiety • Loss of impulse control • Inability to focus on others
    11. 11. Percentages of understanding Individuals living in a safe environment Individuals living in 15% LISTENING 3% 45% BODY LANGUAGE 30% 40% TONE OF VOICE 40% 100% TOTAL 73%
    12. 12. Why do PSS? • To make children safe and connected • To build secure attachments for children (safety, protection and emotional regulation) • Build social competence • Transition children back into learning environments • Build trust in others • Build coping skills • Help families and communities to support children • Improve the social environment for children
    13. 13. Psychosocial circles Community Society functioning Child Family functioning Psychological Feelings Thoughts Behaviours/skills Values/ spirituality Social Relations Roles Responsibilities Opportunities Other social impacts of emergency Family, community and Society Impact on child
    14. 14. Basic services and security Community and family supports Specialised services Focused non-specialised supports Mental health care by mental health specialists (psychiatric nurses, psychologists, psychiatrists, etc.) Strengthening community and family supports Social considerations in basic services and security Advocacy for basic services that are safe, socially appropriate and that protect dignity Parents discussion groups Communal traditional activities Supportive child- friendly spaces Basic mental health care by PHC doctors Psychological First Aid Counselling Intervention Pyramid
    15. 15. TAKE ACTION, EXCHANGE IDEAS, JOIN LEADERS

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