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Extinction is Forever (1)

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The Rotarian Action Group for Endangered Species is
mobilizing Rotarians and Rotaractors to preserve and
protect endangered species by improving global awareness
and taking action. With a focus on rhinos, mountain gorillas,
elephants, and orangutans, you’ll learn about new and
ongoing partnerships and project opportunities for your
club.

Published in: Environment
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Extinction is Forever (1)

  1. 1. Rotarian Action Group Endangered Species Subject: Awareness & Protection of Endangered Species Presenters : Tom Tochterman, Ph.D., Craig Spencer
  2. 2. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 What are Rotarian Action Groups? Rotarian Action Groups can act as Volunteer Consultants for Rotary Clubs and Districts Their role is to enhance the work of Rotary Clubs and Districts in their area of expertise RAG for Population and Development
  3. 3. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 Examples of Rotarian Action Groups Literacy Blood Donation Peace Malaria
  4. 4. Rotarian Action Groups | 4 Why RAGs – To Provide Resources for Areas of Focus Peace and Conflict Resolution Maternal and Child Health Basic Education and Literacy Economic and Community Development Disease Prevention and Treatment Water and Sanitation
  5. 5. Rotarian Action Groups | 5 Rotary Action Group Endangered Species
  6. 6. Rotarian Action Groups | 6 Rotary Action Group Endangered Species: Background Endangered species are driven largely by illicit wildlife trade: • Environmental Crime • Habitat Loss & Degradation • Species Overexploitation • Pollution • Invasive Species and Disease • Climate Change IUCN. (2016). IUCN 2016: International Union for Conservation of Nature annual report 2016. https://portals.iucn.org/library/node/46619 Nellemann, C., & United Nations Environment Programme. (2016). The rise of environmental crime: a growing threat to natural resources, peace, development and security. United Nations. (2016). World wildlife crime report 2016 trafficking in protected species. Place of publication not identified: United Nations Pubns World Wide Fund for Nature. (2016). Living planet report 2016: risk and resilience in a new era. Retrieved from http://awsassets.panda.org/downloads/lpr_living_planet_report_2016.pdf
  7. 7. Rotarian Action Groups | 7 Rotary Action Group Endangered Species: Problem African Wildlife Foundation
  8. 8. Rotarian Action Groups | 8 Rotary Action Group Endangered Species: Purpose The purpose of RAGES is simply to advance the reach of Rotary and improve lives through stewardship of endangered species.
  9. 9. Rotarian Action Groups | 9 RAGES RAGES helps Save our Rhino South Africa: • Providing tracking devices (ankle bracelets) through the Chipembere Rhino Foundation • Risk Boxes that include critical equipment to rangers protecting wildlife and wild spaces. *BRONZE RISK “BOX” $500 *SILVER RISK “BOX” $1,500 *GOLD RISK “BOX” $2,500 *DIAMOND RISK “BOX” $5,000
  10. 10. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 0 RAGES RAGES fights illicit wildlife crime: • Empowering local individuals afflicted directly by wildlife crime to engage in conservation. • Supporting youth environmental education in villages adjacent to wildlife crime ‘hotspots’. Current supported projects include…. • Black Mamba Anti-Poaching Unit • Bush Babies environmental education program. • Say No! Rotary demand reduction campaign.
  11. 11. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 1 The Greater Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa
  12. 12. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 2 Illegal Rhino Horn Trade
  13. 13. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 3
  14. 14. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 4 Who Uses Rhino Horn? • Yemen: Ornamental • China: Traditional Medicine • Vietnam: Status symbol; medicinal, ornamental.
  15. 15. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 5 Crisis Mode and the Preemptive Response - 2012
  16. 16. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 6 Coalition Mission • To make the Greater Kruger National Park the most difficult, undesirable and risky area to poach. • To develop a proud, sympathetic + patriotic community on our boarders = allies to the park! • To equally address the social, cultural, and economic influences of poaching in addition to a common paramilitary or law enforcement response.
  17. 17. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 7 Coalition Key Strategies • Deploy effective boots on the ground. • Development of effective and affordable technology. • Create a stronger pro-environmental ethos in communities adjacent to the Kruger National Park
  18. 18. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 8 Objectives & Predictive Outcomes • Early detection & crime prevention • Monitoring, surveillance + compliance. • Community by-in and an open window into the adjacent communities. • Addressing the social decay + false economy created by rhino poaching.
  19. 19. Rotarian Action Groups | 1 9 Stopping Gateway Crimes • If a person can sneak into a reserve and set snares, he can evolve into a poacher. • Small-time poachers run the same risks and organized crime gangs. • Local knowledge already gained • Contacts in place • BROKEN WINDOW SYNDROME
  20. 20. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 0 APU Data Capture & Analytics
  21. 21. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 1 Daily report for Managers
  22. 22. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 2 APU Performance and Daily Evaluation
  23. 23. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 3 APU activity must peak at optimum incursion times
  24. 24. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 4 Resources deployed to enhance early detection: 1. Patrols detect incursions 2. Cameras detect incursions 3. Pickets placed to detect gunshots and rapid response
  25. 25. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 5
  26. 26. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 6 Tracking outcomes = P.R.O.T.E.C.T Model (Predictive Routine Observation Theory Enhancing Conservation Techniques)
  27. 27. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 7 Black Mambas: Who are they? • 36 young rural African women • 36 sisters, mothers, aunties, wives and future grandmothers! • We are teachers and leaders! • Proud defenders of our wildlife treasures
  28. 28. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 8 They are role models!
  29. 29. Rotarian Action Groups | 2 9 They have pride and self worth!
  30. 30. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 0 They are ‘Champions of the Earth’!
  31. 31. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 1 They cherish life! They do not want to live in a village of orphans!
  32. 32. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 2 They do not want to live an a world without animals!
  33. 33. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 3 They are bread- winners! They have respect, pride, and skills! They have dignity and an identity! They are a family!
  34. 34. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 4 It’s all about crime prevention and disruption!
  35. 35. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 5 Community Benefits
  36. 36. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 6 Public Outreach
  37. 37. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 7 What roles do the Black Mamba’s play in anti-poaching? • Five Mamba Stations on and around Balule and tribal land.
  38. 38. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 8 1) Daily foot patrols on boundaries.
  39. 39. Rotarian Action Groups | 3 9 2) Vehicle patrols at night.
  40. 40. Rotarian Action Groups | 4 0 3) Regular roadblocks and vehicle checks.
  41. 41. Rotarian Action Groups | 4 1 4) Teaching 845 youth at 10 rural primary schools and building environmental resource centers.
  42. 42. Rotarian Action Groups | 4 2 Contact Details Rotary Action Group Endangered Species Dr. Tom L. Tochterman Phone: 425.359.5884 Email: Tom@RhinoMercy.org www.endangeredrag.org

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