How to Conduct a Community Assessment for Education Projects

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“I want to do an education project, but I don’t know where to start!” This is a common challenge. Doing a community needs assessment is a crucial piece to planning successful projects but can often seem like a daunting task. Join us for a great conversation and fun exercise in doing a community assessment in education, and go back to your district with a better understanding of community assessment and planning tools.

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How to Conduct a Community Assessment for Education Projects

  1. 1. 2014 ROTARY INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION How to Conduct a Community Assessment for Education Projects
  2. 2. Past RI President Bill Boyd, New Zealand Moderator The Panel Past RI Director Noraseth Pathmanand, Thailand President, LitRAG Rotarian Amy Matusek, USA Souns Projects-USA and South Africa
  3. 3. 774 MILLION illiterate ADULT>15 years old 123 MILLION illiterate YOUTH15-24 years old THERE ARE 2/3 73 MILLION are female 2/3 493 MILLION are women THERE ARE
  4. 4. Concentrated Language Encounter (CLE) Noraseth Pathmanand
  5. 5. WHERE DO THEY LIVE? 54 million of the 76 million illiterate young women live in only 9 countries
  6. 6. WHO WILL BE ILLITERATE IN THE FUTURE? 57 MILLION out-of-school children 1 in 2 live in sub-Saharan Africa will never enter a classroom have dropped out or will start late 1/2 1/2 GLOBALLY 250 MILLION children of primary school age, whether they are in school or not, lack basic reading and writing skills.* *Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2012
  7. 7. WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR THEM? INEQUALITY UNFULFILLED INDIVIDUAL POTENTIAL AND A LIMITED ABILITY TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE WELL-BEING OF THEIR FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES POVERTY UNSTABLE, POORLY PAID JOBS
  8. 8. REPORTED BY UNESCO
  9. 9. THREE LITERACY LEVELS FUNCTIONAL LITERACY LEVEL BASIC LITERACY LEVEL COMPUTER LITERACY LEVEL
  10. 10. CLE Concentrated Language Encounter Lighthouse Strategy
  11. 11. ROLE AND ACTIVITIES OF LITRAG
  12. 12. CLE TRAINING FOR EGYPT IN BANGKOK
  13. 13. TO BE SUCCESSFUL GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS ROTARY SUPPORTS
  14. 14. CLE PILOT PROJECT IN LIBERIA
  15. 15. VISIT US BOOTH 108 www.litrag.org
  16. 16. Souns projects: building basic literacy in preschools (Lessons learned through 2 MG’s and 3 GG’s) Amy Matusek
  17. 17. • One visit and we could see… – Literacy was clearly a need. • We made sure the community wished to be helped. • We worked with the community to make a plan. • We confirmed available talents and resources. Identify
  18. 18. These children were hungry to learn!
  19. 19. Contact made! Like minded souls!
  20. 20. Projects build community
  21. 21. • Engage the community… – We spent a great deal of time sharing with: • Rotarians in possible partnering districts • Community leadership in host site • Project participants in international and host site Engage
  22. 22. NGO’s were desired partners and guardians for our projects
  23. 23. US Peace Corps and Rotary in South Africa discuss project
  24. 24. Rotary and Head Start leadership in Puerto Rico presenting project
  25. 25. Social get-togethers in community to share project
  26. 26. • Empowering the community… – We embraced and trained the community. – We included new advocates as they demonstrated interest in the project. – The project was expanded through initiatives within the community by the community. Empower
  27. 27. Peace Corps volunteer, “My tools to change the world!”
  28. 28. Simple programs can reach far into a population,
  29. 29. ….or excite dedicated teachers who want to make a difference,
  30. 30. …and build an attitude of “I can do this!” for a generation.
  31. 31. • Sharing results of the project… – We visited project sites often… • Celebrating progress • Assisting with issues • Collecting data and taking pictures to share with participating Rotary clubs • Sending images and short stories to local publications • Presenting the project whenever possible Share
  32. 32. The Rotarian, August 2011, “Where Angels Tread”
  33. 33. 4-year-olds in South Africa building words in home language
  34. 34. Head Start children in USA building words by listening to sounds
  35. 35. “May I read to you?” a child in South Africa asks Rotarian R. Jones
  36. 36. She read a message we wrote!
  37. 37. • Sustain, sustain, sustain… – We trained teachers and trainers of teachers. • Project resulted in a body of trained teachers • Well chosen NGO organizations benefited by adding this program to their offerings • At end of project the work continues with materials, teachers, and teacher trainers in place. Sustain
  38. 38. Training teachers
  39. 39. Training teacher-trainers…
  40. 40. Children training teachers….really!
  41. 41. • Replicate…. – Souns is a program that can be used in all languages that use the Latin Alphabet – There are no expendables, so the materials provide tools for subsequent years. – The program is simple to use for teachers or caregivers. – A trained population ensures project can expand its reach within community. Replicate
  42. 42. There is a better tomorrow for these children! “Thank you, Rotarians!”

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