Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

New Zealand election issues

266 views

Published on

As a New Zealander, it’s vital to think about voting in a way that counts. Our lives are affected by the decisions made by our politicians – Council of Trade Unions have laid out for you ten key issues to think about as you make your decision on where to place your vote in the 2014 election.

Published in: News & Politics
  • I went from getting $3 surveys to $500 surveys every day!! learn more... ●●● https://tinyurl.com/realmoneystreams2019
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Your opinions matter! get paid for them! click here for more info...➤➤ https://tinyurl.com/make2793amonth
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Do you want a longer and thicker penis without expensive surgery, extenders or suction devices that just don't work? Introducing the Penis Enlargement Bible, a 94 page downloadable e-book that has an exclusive two step system that can growth your penis by between 2 and 4 inches within 89 days using safe natural methods ♣♣♣ https://tinyurl.com/getpebible2019
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Like to know how to take easy surveys and get huge checks - then you need to visit us now! Having so many paid surveys available to you all the time let you live the kind of life you want. learn more...➤➤ https://tinyurl.com/realmoneystreams2019
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

New Zealand election issues

  1. 1. JUST VOTE Your vote has never been this important As a New Zealander, it’s vital to think about voting in a way that counts. Our lives are affected by the decisions made by our politicians – we’ve laid out for you ten key issues to think about as you make your decision on where to place your vote in the 2014 election. DYING ON THE JOB Decades of deregulation have made our workplaces downright dangerous The 2010 tragedy at Pike River Mine laid bare the appalling truth about New Zealand work environments: they some of the worst death and injury rates of any developed nation. Every year in New Zealand workplaces… 75 people are killed 400 people are seriously injured 1 in 10 people are injured 200,000 make ACC claims 600-900 people die each year from work-related diseases, such as asbestos*-related illnesses vDID YOU KNOW that New Zealand has not banned imports of products with asbestos? Other countries have. The cost of workplace accidents is at least $3.5 billion yearly Four in every 100,000 workers die from workplace injury in NZ every year NEW ZEALAND’S LOW-WAGE ECONOMY How the policies of the past thirty years have driven us there While GDP* per person has risen substantially over the last 30 years, our average wages have barely risen. The lion’s share of growth gains have gone to capital, not labour. *Gross Domestic Product 36 34 32 30 28 26 24 22 Real average hourly wage compared to productivity gains 1989 2013 If hourly wage had followed productivity gains How it actually rose against CPI* From 1986 to 2013, our measured labour productivity rose 58%, while the average hourly wage rose just 18% after inflation. The cost of labour to the employer has decreased 6.6% over the past two decades. Employers could afford to pay more. (*Consumer Price Index) Sharing the GDP The 1991 Employment Contracts Act dismantled the awards system and changed the balance in the workplace, which made collective wage bargaining extremely difficult. You’re twice as likely to get a pay increase if you're on a collective agreement. Employers could afford to pay more and have been abdicating paying higher wages. The positive effects of higher wages Higher wages and fair treatment Better motivated workers – more effort and thought into work = more productivity Employers make the most of investment into workers = spending money on equipment and working methods Effect of increased spending power of workers creates more demand for goods and services This would be possible with better labour laws Pre ’80s Today Income to shareholders, investors, lenders 60%40% 50% 50% Income to wage and salary earners HOURLYWAGE Cleaner. Casual worker. Varying hours. Can find out on the day if he has work. Employed by a large corporate commercial cleaning contracting company. Has had to take a second job. Company lost a contract one month and he had no work for a week with no pay. On minimum wage. Only has work for 45 weeks of the year. Work is often restructured. Glenda, 1980s Samuel, 2014 Cleaner at the local school. Employed directly by the school. Rostered a month ahead. Works 40 hours a week. Belongs to union. Has standard holidays. Paid extra for overtime and weekend work. Has had job for five years, with three wage increases. Paid 52 weeks of the year. Why was job security better in the past? Workers’ rights have eroded over the past three decades. Only 20% of the workforce belongs to a union now, compared to 70% in the 1980s. The current government wants to bring in a raft of changes that will remove guaranteed meal breaks, allow companies to walk away from pay negotiations and remove automatic collective agreement coverage for new workers. WORKERS’ RIGHTS Why insecure work exists and why it’s a problem In 2012, at least 30% of the workforce were insecure or unemployed. It’s thought the true numbers could be as high as 40-50%. Insecure work is any job that denies workers stability and control of their work situation. Insecure work is characterised by: Uncertainty over how long the job lasts or when it can be terminated Limited worker control over hours, tasks, or safe work practices Low or fluctuating pay Limited access to sick leave, domestic leave or other benefits No or limited chance to gain skills Lack of rights or protection Lack of union representation Occupations especially affected: Cleaning and catering Education and training Retail Care of the elderly Core Public Sector Many insecure workers have multiple jobs and struggle to make ends meet. HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT Our labour market is sick Statistics show our GDP has grown, but unemployment hardly falls. Why aren’t we converting our economic growth into more jobs? Here’s our current situation 154,000 unemployed – that’s 6% of our workforce 254,000 jobless 96,000 under- employed 30%-50% in insecure work +unsafe working conditions 50k 45k 40k 35k 30k 25k GDP per capita and average wage 1965 2014 GDP per capita Real wage New Zealand went from a high-wage economy to a low-wage economy. Workers’ rights to bargain have been eroded by changes in legislation. Between 1982 and 2012 GDP per person up 52% WAGES up 11.5% Growth in the economy has gone not to wages but to investors, shareholders and lenders. 34 29 24 19 EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS ACT 1991 INCOME GAP Are you getting your fair share? Growing income inequality means that many people are missing out on a fair share of the income generated in the eonomy. 50% increase for the top 10% 8% decrease for the bottom 10% Between 1982 and 2012, after housing costs, there was a 50% increase in disposable income for the top 10% of income earners and an 8% decrease for the bottom 10%. The gains from economic growth over these 30 years went mainly to the rich. Disposable income after housing costs, 1982–2012 1953 2011 500k 400k 300k 200k 100k Average real pre-tax income in 2011 dollars Top 1% Bottom 90% In New Zealand, the top 1% received 11 times the 2011 income of the bottom 90%. NBR rich list What are they worth? 1986 - $12 billion 2013 - $60 billion TOP 10% Real incomes 1982 Real incomes 2013 76% rise $59.7k $105.1k BOTTOM 10% 16% rise $12.1k $14k The increasing gap Meanwhile… One in four children in New Zealand live in poverty Benefits – are we looking after Kiwis in need? In 2011, New Zealand had the lowest benefits paid, compared to average wages, in around 33 OECD members. For example, we ranked last for a two-earner couple with children on two-thirds of the average wage. What has caused the increasing rise in income inequality? Employment Contracts Act – enabled employers to hold down wages Harsh cuts In benefit levels The recession has had a greater impact on those on lower incomes Tax cuts received by those on higher incomes Globalisation National’s tax cuts come at a cost Greater inequality Poorer schools Poorer hospitals Inadequate public transport Privatisation of roads and prisons Slack workplace regulations TAXES Taxes – the price we pay for a civilised society Taxes pay for the things we all need. Tax cuts, more often than not, end up as cuts to essential services. The end result is even more disparity between the haves and the have-nots. NZ is almost alone among developed countries NO capital gains tax NO tax on capital transactions NO tax on deceased estates NO tax on gifts Did you know? New Zealand has lower tax for high income earners than most OECD countries? 33% New Zealand 42% OECD average 49% Australia Our taxes are already low – in fact, on average they are the third lowest in the OECD! $15m $14m $13m $12m National’s plan for health and education 2014 2018 Here are National’s forecasts for two key government services over the next four years if it wins the electiontaking into account inflation and population growth. It plans to used money saved by cutting back on essential services to fund tax cuts. Health down by $1.8 billion Education down by $0.5 billion National’s planned cuts GST creates a big chunk of revenue, but hits the least well-off the most SQUEEZING PUBLIC SERVICES Starving our public services The amount our government spends on public services is already low by international standards. And under National, there are more cuts coming. 2013 SOCIAL SPENDING AS A PERCENTAGE OF GDP We rank low by international standards. Public services cover things like ESTONIA US NEWZEALAND UK GERMANY SPAIN FRANCE GREECE Health Education Housing Benefits Social assistance Our health system is ill! Extra costs + Ageing population + More expensive treatments Underfunding of $700 million over the past three years Unmet health needs for 25% of New Zealanders Free education? Yeah, right. Kiwis pay $360 million a year in “voluntary” donations as well as fundraising to help prop up the education systems. Do we help those in need? Benefits were cut by up to 25% in 1991 and have never been increased since, except for inflation adjustments. Now a quarter of our children live in poverty, the majority in households which depend on state support. Budget cuts on the horizon Bill English want to “cut core Crown spending” to just 25% of GDP – down from 35% in 2009. In that case, these cuts would only be the beginning… Health x 12.3% Early Education x 6.9% Primary x 7.5% Secondary x 3.1% Tertiary x 8.7% Social Welfare x 6% A QUARTEROF NEW ZEALAND CHILDREN LIVE IN POVERTY 2 OUT OF 5OF THEM ARE FROM HOUSEHOLDS WHERE AT LEAST ONE ADULT IS IN FULL TIME WORK OR SELF EMPLOYED HOUSING HIKES It’s getting harder for us Kiwis to buy our own homes House buying is increasingly out of reach of many New Zealanders, as prices soar and incomes stagnate, while those renting or in state housing face equally severe problems. House price to disposable income ratio Our house-price-to-average-net-income ratio is further above its long term average than in any other developed country (except Belgium). 1980 2013 The average house used to cost 2 times the yearly average net income – manageable for most people. Now a house costs 5 times the average yearly income. International standards say we shouldn’t spend more than 30% of our incomes on housing. But 27% of Kiwis spend more than that. And 40% of that group have unmanageably high housing costs. Public housing Only 69,000 (4%) of our housing is state housing. Fewer than we had in 1992, and the population has grown by almost a third. (Public housing in some Western European countries is as much as 20%) SELLING OFF OUR ASSETS And why we’re all worse off The National Government’s determination to push ahead with selling off state- owned assets was driven by two things: pure ideology, and vested interests in the financial sector with close ties to the National Party. Selling off our assets – a financially smart idea? Not according to Treasury figures… Taxpayers worse off by $145 million each year Genesis Energy Meridian Energy Mighty River Power Air New Zealand Rembember the sales? NZ RAIL Asset-stripped and run down costing $4 billion to fix TELECOM Huge profits paid out to new owners, competition stymied, govt left to fund broadband AIR NZ Bankrupted by private owners Who were the winners? Not the “mums and dads” Dams were built to save Kiwis money. Now the sales line the pockets of private enterprise. NZ Rail was built using our taxes, for efficient and economical goods and passenger transport, keeping big trucks off the roads. Kiwibank was started as real competition to the big Australian banks and brought back the idea of local branches. They were built with our taxes, for the common good. ROCK STAR ECONOMY? We’re singing the wrong tunes There’s been talk of New Zealand’s “rock star economy” in the financial media, but if you look five years beyond the Christchurch construction boom and ask what will sustain our jobs and living standards, there’s nothing there. The songs we’re being sung are broken records “The Market Knows Best” “Government Can’t Pick Winners (so don’t even try to think about it)” “Inflation Targeting is All You Need” “China Will Keep Us Afloat” “Budget Surpluses Are All That Matters” “Beneficiaries Are Lazy” 20 years of: • deregulation • an unsustainable exchange rate • low-wage policies • union busting • uncontrolled overseas borrowing • shrinking government = growth rate of income per capita stuck at 1% or below each year The neoliberal legacy: • reliance on agriculture • shrinking manufacturing sector • shameless price-gouging in electricity, gas and telecommunications • rise in huge personal fortunes (after looting public assets) What did we get? The reality is different to the songs we've been hearing…The main effect of neoliberalism in New Zealand has been a radical change in who benefits from the economy – and not the promised faster economic growth. 115 110 100 95 90 85 80 1980 2012 NZ per capita GDP in US$ relative to OECD average OECD average New Zealand Authorised by Helen Kelly, NZCTU, Level 7, 178 Willis Street, Wellington Download a pdf: www.union.org.nz/election2014/full-infographic.pdf

×