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Norsu penaso outcomes based syllabus design

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Norsu penaso outcomes based syllabus design

  1. 1. ANTHONY M. PENASO, PhD, DSc, EdD, DM, DPA Vice President for Academic Affairs & Dean, Graduate School Central Mindanao University Musuan, Bukidnon SEMINAR-WORKSHOP ON OUTCOMES-BASED SYLLABUS DESIGN, TEST CONSTRUCTION AND ITEM ANALYSIS NEGROS ORIENTAL STATE UNIVERSITY JULY 15-16, 2013 Dumaguete City
  2. 2.  A syllabus is a legally-binding contract between the instructor and the student.
  3. 3.  The syllabus should present this information in a way that is
  4. 4.  Reasons to make this promise
  5. 5.  Objections
  6. 6. Two Fundamental Criteria:
  7. 7. What are outcomes?
  8. 8. OBE (Education) OBC (Curriculum) What the studentWhat the student should achieve?should achieve? OBLT (Learning & Teaching) OBA (Assessment) How to make the student achieve the outcome? How to measure what the student has achieved? The ProcessThe Process FlowFlow
  9. 9. CONTENT-BASED LEARNING SYSTEM OUTCOMES-BASED LEARNING SYSTEM Passive students Active learners Assessment process – exam and grade driven Continuous assessment Rote learning Critical thinking, reasoning, reflection and action Content based/broken into subjects Integration knowledge, learning relevant/ connected real life situations Textbook/worksheet focused & teacher- centered Learner-centered and educator/ facilitator use group/ teamwork Content Based Learning Versus Outcomes Based Learning (Source: Spady, 1994)
  10. 10. CONTENT-BASED LEARNING SYSTEM OUTCOMES-BASED LEARNING SYSTEM See syllabus as rigid and non negotiable Learning programs seen as guides that allow educators to be innovative and creative in designing programs/ activities Teachers/trainers responsible for learning - motivated by personality of teacher Learners take responsibility for their learning, learners motivated by constant feedback/ affirmation of worth Emphasizes what teacher hopes to achieve Emphasizes outcomes – what learner becomes & understands Content placed in rigid time frames Flexible time frames - learners work at own pace
  11. 11. Outcomes Based Principles (Source: Spady, 1994; Killen, 2000) OBE Principles Explanation Application to practice Clarity of focus  Focus on what learners should be able to do successfully  Help learners develop competencies  Enable predetermined significant outcomes  Clarify short & long term learning intentions  Focus assessments on significant outcomes Design down  Begin curriculum design with a clear definition of the significant learning that learners are to achieve by the end of their formal education  Develop systematic education curricula  Trace back from desired end results  Identity “learning building blocks”  Link planning, teaching & assessment decisions to significant learner outcomes High expectations  Establish high, challenging performance standards  Engage deeply with issues on learning  Push beyond where normally have gone Expanded opportunities  Do not learn same thing in same way in same time  Provide multiple learning opportunities matching learner’s needs with teaching techniques
  12. 12. Jason L. Frand, “The Information-Age Mindset: Changes in Students and Implications for Higher Education,” Educause Review 35(5): 14-24, Sept.-Oct. 2000.)
  13. 13. “Planning without action is futile, action without planning  is fatal”. -Unknown
  14. 14. PLANNING YOUR SYLLABUS 1. Develop a well- grounded rationale for your course. 2. Define and delimit course content 4. Structure your students’ active involvement in learning 3. Decide on desired learning outcomes and assessment measures 5. Identify and assemble resources required for active learning
  15. 15. EXAMPLES OF GOALS:
  16. 16. GOAL: To develop problem-solving abilities
  17. 17. BLOOM’S REVISED TAXONOMY
  18. 18. BLOOM’S REVISED TAXONOMY CIRCLE
  19. 19. PLANNING YOUR SYLLABUS 1. Develop a well- grounded rationale for your course. 2. Define and delimit course content 4. Structure your students’ active involvement in learning 3. Decide on desired learning outcomes and assessment measures 5. Identify and assemble resources required for active learning
  20. 20. 1. Develop a well- grounded rationale for your course.
  21. 21. 2. Define and delimit course content
  22. 22. 3. Decide on desired learning outcomes and assessment measures Examples of learning outcomes, in addition to the conceptual knowledge and technical skills of a discipline or field:
  23. 23. [Kurfiss (1988) pp. 9-10 of Judith Grunert, The Course Syllabus. Boston: Anker, 1997.]
  24. 24. 4. Structure your students’ active involvement in learning Decide what topics are appropriate to what types of student activities and assignments
  25. 25. Decide on a mix of strategies to use to shape basic skills and procedures, present information, guide inquiry, monitor individual and group activities, and support and challenge critical reflection. The strategies you choose must fit with the outcomes you hope to achieve. 4. Structure your students’ active involvement in learning
  26. 26. 5. Identify and assemble resources required for active learning
  27. 27. 2. What an outcomes-based syllabus includes in addition to this basic information:
  28. 28. 47 Creating an Objective-based Syllabus Danielle Mihram, Director Center for Excellence in Teaching University of Southern California Outcome Based Education (OBE) Puan Dalmataksiah Binti Mohd Zain ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  29. 29. 48 Syllabus Writing Workshop Tom McCambridge Assistant Professor Webpage address: http://public.clunet.edu/~mccamb Outcomes Based/Outcomes Focused Education Overview Mollie Butler, RN, PhD ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  30. 30. Thank you very much for listening!
  31. 31. 50 Questions

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