Understandin
g Dance
Prof. Runelo Piñero
History of Dance
Trance Dance
( Bali, Indonesia )
Line Dance
( Greeks and
Romans )
Dionysian
Dance
( Greeks )
Beginnings and
historical accounts of
Dance
From the notes of Western civilization
started among the Greeks and the Romans...
From among the Greeks, dancing was
associated with Dionysian merrymaking, as
evidence on vase paintings and stone
carvings...
The early Christians
included in their teachings
a love-hate relationship to
the body, as they could not
accommodate the d...
In the late 1685, a track against Mixt or
Promiscuous Dancing, the New England
Puritan divine Increase Mather
permitted th...
There was no record of the exact date and place,
but it might have been in twelfth-century-
Provence- home of troubadours ...
This public dancing in couples were not only
extraordinary in the Judeo-Christian tradition;
it was something that would h...
Prof. Runelo Piñero
Dance (1)
Dance (1)
Dance (1)
Dance (1)
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Dance (1)

  1. 1. Understandin g Dance Prof. Runelo Piñero
  2. 2. History of Dance Trance Dance ( Bali, Indonesia ) Line Dance ( Greeks and Romans ) Dionysian Dance ( Greeks )
  3. 3. Beginnings and historical accounts of Dance From the notes of Western civilization started among the Greeks and the Romans, as found in various archaeological and historical facts. The analysis of great philosophers of ancient times pointed out the significance of dance into the live of the people during this period. Plato (427- 347 B.C.) and Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) left an elaborate literature of dance theory and criticism. They unanimously agreed in recognizing the powers of dance (bot positive and negative) in Greek society.
  4. 4. From among the Greeks, dancing was associated with Dionysian merrymaking, as evidence on vase paintings and stone carvings as presented by scientist of the time. Dionysus, the nature god, is identified with the wine. According to Greek mythological past, the infant Zeus, (first among Olympian gods) owed his very life in the cult dancing rites of Dionysus after he was hidden from his father trying to kill him. His cries were supposedly drowned by the clashing shields and wild dancing of the devotees.
  5. 5. The early Christians included in their teachings a love-hate relationship to the body, as they could not accommodate the dancing body to their worship. Christianized body dancing disapproved the example performed by Salome to the Golden Calf which for them was done wrongly at the wrong time and the wrong purpose.
  6. 6. In the late 1685, a track against Mixt or Promiscuous Dancing, the New England Puritan divine Increase Mather permitted that “sober and grave Dancing of Men with Women, or of Women with Women was allowed “in due reason, and with moderation”. But as for lewd dancing of any kind , and especailly “Gynecandrical dancing”, Mather had no doubt that this was literally the creation of the Devil.
  7. 7. There was no record of the exact date and place, but it might have been in twelfth-century- Provence- home of troubadours and the birthplace of country love- that Western-style couple dancing began. A man and a woman might break from formation of a line or circle dance or from the stately procession of a court entertainment, to execute few steps in unison with perhaps a brief touching of the hands to help coordinate their movements, before rejoining the formation, to be followed by another couple and then another.
  8. 8. This public dancing in couples were not only extraordinary in the Judeo-Christian tradition; it was something that would have been discouraged in many parts of the world as a violation of public decorum. Inevitably, there were successful attempts throughout Western Europe to ban couple dancing. From the renaissance onwards, dance in Judeo- Christian societies typically expressed secular rather than religious concerns. This is not to say that West’s long history of ambivalence about dancing body left no mark on the aesthetic of Western dance.
  9. 9. Prof. Runelo Piñero

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