ELPA 701 Introduction to Higher, Postsecondary and Continuing Education
                         Mon. 5-7pm, spring 2006, ...
Syllabus - Spring 2006

                             Monday, 5-7 PM

UW Madison locations at: Madison (Pyle Center), White...
Course syllabus printable version:



I.      Special accommodation: I want to include persons with special challenges in ...
<http://www.education.wisc.edu/elpa/academics/syllabi/>, and is provided in the content section
of Learn @ UW for ELPA 701...
Videotaped conversations with practitioners and scholars on topics related to the major
course units are available on DVD ...
To provide an overview of past trends and future directions for educational leadership in
    higher, postsecondary and co...
This and future courses with various formats are planned for each of the three
           cooperating UW campuses.
       ...
IV.   Course organization: Several course features contribute to accessibility, interactivity, and

      application. Use...
A. Email – Standard Email procedures can connect you with the lead instructor, resource

    persons, other students, and ...
•   Challenge ideas, not people.

      •   Keep postings to no more than two screens. People get lost and tired if they a...
students, and explanation of relations among units.

1/30/06   B. MISSION (videoconference)

          Basic questions for...
Aspin, et al (2001); Cranton (1994): Delors (1998); Edelson (1992); Friere (1998)

               Comments: See streaming ...
Bredeson (2003) pp. 153-162

                                              Cont. Educ. -          Silberman (1998) pp. 1-1...
Specialized readings (on four themes)

                                            Hi. Ed. Adm. -Bess and Webster (1999) p...
2.      What are major influences on instructor performance?



              Basic readings for all students

           ...
1.      What methods and procedures are typical of the

                teaching/learning transactions in several types of...
Comments: Report due by end of Unit F. (2/29/06)

See streaming video conversations 9 on staff development with Amy Wick, ...
694-708.

                                                Cont. Educ. -       Edelson (1992) pp. 5-15,

                  ...
Specialized readings (on four themes)

                                           Hi. Ed. Adm. -        Bess and Webster (...
1.      What are major relationships between provider functioning

                     and local, national and internatio...
Comments: see streaming video conversations 15 on societal context with Al

Phelps, and 16 on future directions with Betty...
Sch. Staff Dev. -      Bess and Webster (1999) pp.

                                       663-668.

                     ...
for each student to complete and email at the time of registration and before the first

   course session. (See Section V...
a. Purpose- To select and critique an article or equivalent excerpt related to the theme

   selected by the student, whic...
relevant to course purpose and student interest.

    2.     Discussion (up to 500 words) to include reflections on import...
5.     Major findings, conclusions, and discussion related to rationale.

   6.     References

d. Aspects to guide report...
(such as PK-12 schools, WTCS, or university) and could interact by email, computer

   conferencing and telephone conferen...
(6) Survey

                    ELPA 701 (spring 2006) Survey Information

A. Before or soon after start of semester (stud...
C. Criteria for Instructor Assessment of Written Reports            Low                High
         1. Clear Focus and Pu...
Brent Nelson, Executive Director eTech College of Wisconsin, WTCS, coordinates
    certificate courses for WTCS faculty, w...
Bibliography

Altbach, P., Berdahl, R., & Gumport, P. (Eds.). (2005). American higher education in the
         twenty-fir...
Bredeson, P. (2003). Designs for learning: A new architecture for professional
       development in schools. Thousand Oak...
Delors, J. (1998). Learning: The treasure within: Report to UNESCO of the
         international commission on education f...
Houle, C. (1980). Continuing learning in the professions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Jarvis, P. (1999). The practitioner...
Moore, M. G. Pittman, V. V., Anderson, T. Kramarae, C. (2003). From Chautauqua to
        the virtual university: A centur...
Senge, P., Cambron-McCabe, N., Lucas., T., Smith, B., Dutton, J., & Kleiner, A. (2000).
        Schools that learn: A fift...
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  1. 1. ELPA 701 Introduction to Higher, Postsecondary and Continuing Education Mon. 5-7pm, spring 2006, Alan B. Knox OVERVIEW AND MENU OF CONTENTS CONTENT SECTION PAGE Orientation Introduction IIA 3-5 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) IIC 5-7 Accommodation I 3 Course Instructor Information Cover page Purchase two textbooks IIA 4 Class Locations IIA 4 Monday 5-7pm Class Sessions (1/23-5/1, except 3/13 break) Content Overview of course IIB 5 Objectives of course III 7 Organization of course IV 7-8 Study/Discussion Questions (9 units) VI 10-20 Basic Readings (9 units) VI 10-20 Specialized Readings (four themes) VI 10-20 Supplementary References for papers (9 units) VI 10-20 Individualization VII 20-27 Bibliography IX 29-35 Technology A. Email V 8-10 B. Video conference V 8 C. Audio conference V 9 D. E-reserves XII 29 E. Conversations X 27-28 F. Group Discussion (live, Mon, 3 locations) VF 9 G. Group Discussion (computer, 4 themes) VH 9 H. Netiquette, on-line guidelines VA 9-10 I. How to play video conversations XIII 9-10 Communication Resource Persons VIIC 21-22 Report – article critique VIID 22 Report – Interview VIID2 22-23 Report – Inquiry VIID3 23-24 Assessment project – Baldrige VIID5 25 Weekly progress reports VIID5 24 Grades VIID 22-24 Survey Form VIIB 26-27 1 1
  2. 2. Syllabus - Spring 2006 Monday, 5-7 PM UW Madison locations at: Madison (Pyle Center), Whitewater, and Oshkosh ELPA 701: INTRODUCTION TO HIGHER, POSTSECONDARY, AND CONTINUING EDUCATION (call number: Section 2: 70251; Section 3: 71290) Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis School of Education University of Wisconsin-Madison Lead instructor: Alan B. Knox 1282H Educational Sciences 1025 West Johnson street Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 263-2937 FAX: (608) 265-3135 Email: knox@education.wisc.edu (Write 701 on Subject line to send your message to my course folder) Webpage: <http://www.education.wisc.edu/elpa/people/faculty/knox.html> 2
  3. 3. Course syllabus printable version: I. Special accommodation: I want to include persons with special challenges in this course. I will treat confidentially the information that you share with me related to disabilities, language, or cultural background and will provide you with information about special accommodations and assistance regarding curriculum, instruction, or assessments to enable you to fully participate. II A. Introduction Learn @ UW – Introduction to ELPA 701 (spring 06) As the lead instructor, I welcome you to 2006 distance education offering of this graduate course on educational leadership. This introduction provides highlights to indicate ways that students can help make their experience accessible, active and relevant. Several innovative features reflect essential team work for the spring 2006 offering that combines distance education procedures and synchronous sessions on Mondays 5-7pm at three UW campuses. This entails the Pyle Center at UW Madison and corresponding staff and facilities at UW Oshkosh and UW Whitewater. The UW Madison Division of Instructional Technology provides Learn@UW for computer based education including e-reserves and digital streaming video connections. The expertise of many faculty and staff members make this distinctive offering possible. During Fall 2005, a focus group on each of the three cooperating UW campuses met with me to discuss ways to enhance course relevance and practicality. Each focus group was composed of people experienced in educational leadership in various higher, postsecondary and continuing education settings, along with some potential registrants. A course syllabus drafted in spring 2005, has been revised several times as planning for ELPA 701 progressed. The current detailed draft is available on the ELPA departmental website 3
  4. 4. <http://www.education.wisc.edu/elpa/academics/syllabi/>, and is provided in the content section of Learn @ UW for ELPA 701 <https://learnuw.wisc.edu/> Interaction and feedback during the semester will result in ongoing modifications. The two textbooks to be purchased cover the basic readings with savings of time and travel. Most of the remaining readings can be downloaded from electronic reserves, to be printed or read on screen. The text can be purchased from a local or online bookstore, or from University Bookstore Madison. Madison customers can pick up copies that are on hand at State Street (Library Mall). Any students can order the two textbooks by calling 1-800-993-2665. And press 3 for the text department. Ask to have Bess and Webster (1999) and Merriam and Brockett (1997) for ELPA 701 (Knox Sections 2,3) shipped to you by giving them your credit card number. (A $6.00 shipping and handling fee will be charged.) On Learn @ UW, the space on frequently asked questions (FAQ) lists brief answers to provide orientation at the outset and throughout the course. The Learn @ UW website contains much procedural information to enable students to benefit from extensive distance education resources. The synchronous sessions are scheduled on Mondays from 5-7 pm from January 23 to May 1 (except March 13 which is spring break). The three locations are: Madison Room 232, Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street Oshkosh Room 161, Oshkosh Spanbauer Center, 3601 Oregon St. (next to airport) Whitewater Room 1230A, Anderson Library building, lower level. Some of the sessions will use videoconferencing (as noted in the syllabus units) and the remaining will use audio conferencing. The basic readings for the course generally, and for students interested in one of the four strands (higher education administration, student services, school staff development, and all types of adult and continuing education) are available from e-reserves. 4
  5. 5. Videotaped conversations with practitioners and scholars on topics related to the major course units are available on DVD for streaming video for preparation for the Monday evening session on that unit. Instructor information is available from the ELPA webpage: www.education.wisc.edu/elpa/people/faculty/knox.html II B. Overview: This introductory graduate course provides an overview of higher, postsecondary, and continuing education. The units span educational leadership regarding people, programs, providers, and improving practice. Each unit includes content on past trends, current situations, and future issues. Organization of the Units encourages each student to individualize by focusing and adapting to fit their own background and career directions. Basic unit questions and readings emphasize widespread principles and shared values, which discussion of diverse viewpoints can help clarify. To address various student backgrounds and interests, each unit allows each student to focus on one of four themes regarding readings and applications. They are community college and university administration, student services (including transitions from secondary to postsecondary education), PK-12 school administration roles regarding staff development and community education, and all types of part time and short term adult and continuing education. In addition to focusing on a theme, each student is encouraged to apply concepts to the types of uncertain and ill-defined issues that educational leaders confront in actual practice settings. II C. FAQ ELPA 701 Spring ‘06 1. What is the main purpose of 701? 5
  6. 6. To provide an overview of past trends and future directions for educational leadership in higher, postsecondary and continuing education, as a prerequisite for more in-depth study of major areas of practice. 2. How do the course units provide such an introduction? The interrelated course units include reading, discussion, reflection, and writing about concepts, examples rationale, sources for further study that together can enrich a broad mastery for visionary educational leadership. 3. What options in the course plan provide flexibility and individualization? The syllabus questions and basic readings from the two main texts provide a shared foundation to help students interested in one of the four themes to complete specialized readings and interact, so as to enrich the individualized reading, writing, and reflection of each student. 4. How could this overview improve professional practice? Students can use their career experience and interests regarding educational leadership to emphasize reading, writing, conversation, and reflection to apply concepts to their specific career interests. 5. Why does the course use instructional technology? Distance education arrangements can provide each student with convenient access to learning resources and interaction with students at various locations, which supplements synchronous face to face class sessions and instructional interaction. 6. What familiarity with instructional technology should students have? Minimal familiarity is required for audio and video conferencing at synchronous class session; Learn @ UW allows basic use of computer based education with the equivalent of sending and receiving email; but students with more computer experience have more options. 7. What minimum level of computer capability is required? Downloading of programs (perhaps with help from Learn @ UW staff) allows satisfactory participation by students with access to a PC or Mac computer at home, work or elsewhere that less than five years old. 8. How can students benefit from viewpoints of other students? Learn @ UW can enable students to easily send and receive and participate in on-line discussions with other students who share similar interests, in addition to synchronous sessions with audio or video interaction with all other students. 9. Why are periodic surveys and brief reports included? Such efficient feedback can increase responsiveness and help modify course plans and implementation. 10. Can people enroll as special students without pursuing a graduate degree? In addition to some students who are matriculated for a graduate degree or certificate from one of the cooperating UW campuses or elsewhere, some students typically do so for professional development by following instructions on the office of Special and Guest Students website. < http://www.education.wisc.edu/elpa/admissions/SpecialStudentEnrollmentProcess.htm > 11. Can this ELPA course and future courses related to higher, postsecondary and continuing education be applied to degree or certification programs? 6
  7. 7. This and future courses with various formats are planned for each of the three cooperating UW campuses. 12. Are special accommodations available? Contact the instructor about available special accommodations and assistance for persons with disability or special challenges related to communication or mobility. 13. What provision is made for access to supplementary readings, beyond the two basic course texts? Beyond the texts and other readings, (that can be downloaded and printed), students can search and download many journal articles, along with books from the three cooperating UW campuses libraries, supplemented by interlibrary loan. 14. What is the contribution of the DVD conversations related to the course units? Streaming video on a computer allows students to play brief conversations with practitioners and scholars on topics related to course units, in preparation for synchronous sessions, similar to readings done during the previous week or a live guest at class. 15. Can other guests and course students also made brief presentations? Contact the instructor about such arrangements for pre-recorded or live presentations. 16. How flexible are the arrangements for course papers and grades? The syllabus provides guidelines for papers and target dates, but contact the instructor for individualized arrangements. III. Course objectives: As a result of this course on educational leadership in higher, postsecondary, and continuing education, students should be better able to: 1. Understand distinctive features of leadership in various provider organizations. 2. Critically assess pertinent writings and concepts regarding past trends and future directions. 3. Analyze roles and contributions of educational leaders and related stakeholders including students, teachers, administrators, and members of the public. 4. Consider ways in which educational leaders can strengthen teaching and learning. 5. Explore potential inquiry, research and evaluation procedures. 7
  8. 8. IV. Course organization: Several course features contribute to accessibility, interactivity, and application. Use of instructional technology and distance education helps minimize time spent traveling and searching for materials. Print and electronic materials enable students to read in preparation for course sessions and papers. The scheduled and interactive synchronous sessions emphasize discussion and sharing related to study questions for each unit. Each syllabus unit lists basic text readings for all students. Each unit also lists more specialized and detailed readings related to four themes that reflect current or future student roles (with provision for asynchronous interaction among students interested in each theme). Details on student papers and grading are in section VII D of the syllabus on individualization. Suggested readings are noted with author/editor name and date of publication, with full bibliographic citations in the syllabus bibliography. Instructional technology also facilitates contributions by guest experts from any location. The two course texts are: Bess and Webster (1999) Foundations of American Higher Education; and Merriam and Brockett (1997) The Profession and Practice of Adult Education. Additional basic readings are provided through e-reserves. V. Educational technology: Various forms of distance education are included to enhance access and interaction for students in various locations. The following brief explanations provide basic information about the main forms of educational technology that are included in ELPA 701. Contact the instructor about questions or problems. During the semester, Learn @ UW contains explanations and guidelines, with access to a help desk at (608) 264-HELP 8
  9. 9. A. Email – Standard Email procedures can connect you with the lead instructor, resource persons, other students, and Learn @ UW. B. Videoconferencing will be used for about half of the Monday 5-7pm synchronous sessions at the three UW locations (Whitewater, Oshkosh, Madison) C. Audioconferencing will be used for the remaining Monday sessions. D. E-reserves enables students to download, read, and print all required readings except the two course texts which students use. (See Section XII for list of E-reserves) E. For each of the nine course units, several brief conversations can be accessed by streaming video and viewed in preparation for discussion during the course session on each unit. ( See Section XIII for explanation of how to download and play video clips in a Learn @ UW course) (See Section X for list of 20 conversations.) F. Group discussion via teleconferencing during Monday 5 to 7 synchronous sessions is planned, especially for the 3/6, 3/27, 4/10, and 5/1 sessions on applications for concepts from preceding units. G. Small group computer based on line learning is also planned, especially for students interested in one of the four themes ( Hi. Ed. Admin, Stud. Serv., Sch. Staff Dev.; and Cont. Educ.) (See Section VH for guidelines for on-line learning) H. The following guidelines for netiquette in online learning may be useful http://academic.son.wisc.edu/wistrec/archive/general_info/general_info.html Netiquette "Netiquette" is a code of behavior for the Internet. You should follow these in addition to normal rules of behavior for a classroom setting. We will review both. For the Learning Environment • Use proper language. One educator suggests that you speak as though your grandmother were in the room. • No jokes, insults, or threats of a personal, racial, or sexual nature. Otherwise, humor and wit are greatly encouraged and appreciated. 9
  10. 10. • Challenge ideas, not people. • Keep postings to no more than two screens. People get lost and tired if they are too long. • DON'T USE ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. PEOPLE FEEL AS IF THEY ARE BEING SCREAMED AT. • Don't worry too much about typing errors and spelling, as long as you can be understood. • Communication is 80% nonverbal but we can't see you wink or smile. It is often helpful to use "emoticons" (emotion icons) or abbreviations to indicate your state of being. The most common emoticons are the smiley face :) and the frowning face :( There are others which you will learn along the way. Some common abbreviations are: lol = laughing out loud rofl = rolling on floor laughing LTNS = Long Time No See IMHO = In My Humble Opinion BTW = By The Way For a list of emoticons visit: http://www.albion.com/netiquette/book/0963702513p59.html General Internet Rules of Behavior There is a book on Netiquette which is posted on the Internet. It explains in detail the rules for online communication. The Core Rules from that book are: Rule 1: Remember the Human Rule 2: Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life Rule 3: Know where you are in cyberspace Rule 4: Respect other people's time and bandwidth Rule 5: Make yourself look good online Rule 6: Share expert knowledge Rule 7: Help keep flame wars under control Rule 8: Respect other people's privacy Rule 9: Don't abuse your power Rule 10: Be forgiving of other people's mistakes VI. Units: Dates Units Topics Questions Themes Readings 1/23/06 A. INTRODUCTION (first session; videoconference) Review of course purposes, plans, procedures. Brief introductions of participants, based on prior information. Rationale for individualization and active student roles. Overview of course concepts related to types of providers of interest to course 10
  11. 11. students, and explanation of relations among units. 1/30/06 B. MISSION (videoconference) Basic questions for all students 1. What are the main similarities and differences between the basic missions of several types of providers? 2. What are major internal and external influences on provider mission? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 23-37. Merriam and Brockett (1997) pp. 1-13, 15-25, 29-50, 66-75, 78-89, 94-99, 226-232. Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 435-457. Boswell and Wilson (2004) pp. 1-53 Student Serv. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 253-256. Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 47-62. Goodchild and Wechsler (1997) pp. 403-415. Cont. Educ. - Stubblefield and Keane (1994) pp. 291-315 Davis, Barnes, Fox (2003) pp. 9-24, 341-360 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers) 11
  12. 12. Aspin, et al (2001); Cranton (1994): Delors (1998); Edelson (1992); Friere (1998) Comments: See streaming video conversations: 1 on university outreach with Mary Grant and 2 on student services with Jerlando Jackson (also relevant are 3 on community colleges, 9 on staff development in enterprises) 2/6/06 C. PROVIDERS (video conference) Basic questions for all students 1. What provider organization characteristics are especially important for educational leaders to consider? 2. What relationships among providers deserve special attention? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 7-22. Merriam and Brockett (1997) pp. 54-66, 103-115. Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 414-419. Goodchild and Wechsler (1997) pp. 667-699. Student Serv. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 114-135. Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 420-426. 12
  13. 13. Bredeson (2003) pp. 153-162 Cont. Educ. - Silberman (1998) pp. 1-12, 183-200 Mott, Daley (2000) pp. 3-22 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers) Bolman and Deal (2003); Boud and Garrick (1999); Kasworm, et. al. (2002); Maehl (2000); Moore, et. al (2003); Quigley (1997); Saltiel, et. al. (1998); Stern and Imel (2002). Comments: Report 1 due by the end of Unit C (3/6/06). See streaming video conversations 3 on community colleges with Al Phelps, and 6 on Learning Community with Jim Shaw. (Also relevant are 1 on university outreach and 9 on staff development in enterprises) 2/13/06 D. LEARNERS Basic questions for all students 1. What are major personal and situational influences on student access and success? 2. How and why do student characteristics vary across types of providers? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 148-152, 295-306. Merriam and Brockett (1997) pp. 115-119, 130-140, 189-200, 240-243, 246-248. 13
  14. 14. Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 38-44. Student Serv. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 81-113. Goodchild and Wechsler (1999) pp. 739-753 Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 153-161. Cont. Educ. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 467-475. Merriam (2001) pp. 3-13, 43-51, 93-96 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers) Belenky, et al (1997); Dominice (2000); Guy (1999), Hayes and Colin (1994); Hayes, et al (2000); Kegan (1994); Merriam (2001); Merriam and Caffarella (1999); Mezirow et al (2000); Wlodkowski (1999) Comments: See streaming video conversations 5 on adult learning with Betty Hayes, and 6 on learning community with Jim Shaw (Also relevant are 19, 20, on odyssey project with Emily Auerbach) 2/20/06 E. INSTRUCTORS Basic questions for all students 1. What are typical roles and responsibilities of instructors in various types of providers? 14
  15. 15. 2. What are major influences on instructor performance? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 167-179; 245-253 Ross-Gordon (2002) pp. 17-25 Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 180-191. Altbach, Berdahl and Gumport (1999) ch. 10. Stud. Serv. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 257-271. Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 192-205. Cont. Educ. - Galbraith (2004) pp 3-21, 141-164, 451-471 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers) Apps (1996); Bates and Poole (2003); Cranton (1996); King and Lawler (2003); Palmer (1998) Comments: See streaming video conversations 7 on faculty development with Brent Nelson, and 8 on various providers with Rosemary Lehman. First paper on article critique due (2/20) 2/27/06 F. TRANSACTIONS/METHODS (video conference) Basic questions for all students 15
  16. 16. 1. What methods and procedures are typical of the teaching/learning transactions in several types of providers? 2. What types of transactions deserve more attention by educational leaders? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 323-336; 337-342 Ross-Gordon (2002) pp 5-15, 63-71 Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 230-244 Stud. Serv. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 311-322 Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 213-229, 337-342. Cont. Educ. - Caffarella (2002) ch. 166-202 Pratt and Assoc (1998) pp. 33-53 Brookfield and Preskill (1999) ch. 2 Levine (2005) pp 73-87; 99-111, 171-180 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers) Merrill (2005) pp. 13-16. Brookfield (2004); Daloz (1999); Vella (1994); Vella (1995) 16
  17. 17. Comments: Report due by end of Unit F. (2/29/06) See streaming video conversations 9 on staff development with Amy Wick, and 10 on various methods with Chere Gibson 3/6/06 Session on Units B through F (videoconference) 3/13/06 No Session due to Spring Break 3/20/27 G. ADMINISTRATORS Basic questions for all students 1. What are widespread roles and functions of educational leaders across various providers? 2. What personal and situational influences are related to administrative effectiveness in several types of providers? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 499-507; 458-466 Merriam and Brockett (1997) pp. 119-128, 218-226, 232-236, 275-283. Johnson, Hanna, Olcott (2003) pp. 55-74 Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 555-579. Altbach, Berdhal, Gumport (1999) ch. 3, 13. Stud. Serv. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 70-87. Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 17
  18. 18. 694-708. Cont. Educ. - Edelson (1992) pp. 5-15, 95-105 Houle (1980) pp. 34-75 Soney (2005) pp. 17-19 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers) Cervero and Wilson (1994); Cervero and Wilson (2001); Donaldson and Kozoll (1999), Mulcrone (1993) Comments: see streaming video conversations 11 with Phil Melissen on school development with Paul Bredeson and 12 on Quality Improvement session on Unit G and earlier units (video conference) 3/27/06 Session on Unit G (videoconferences) Second paper on interview due at end of Unit G (3/20/06) 4/3/06 H. ASSESSMENT Basic questions for all students 1. What are desirable types of research and evaluation concepts and procedures? 2. How should assessment be related to leadership? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 381-390. Knox (2002) pp. 3-39, 297-309 18
  19. 19. Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 585-594. Institutional Accreditation, 23 pages. Stud. Serv. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 595-608. Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 609-610. Cont. Educ. - Merriam (2002) pp. ______________ Queeney (1995) pp. 117-142 Phillips and Stone (2002) pp. 1-21, 245-250 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers): Angelo and Cross (1993) pp 105-108; Brooks and Watkins (1994); Fenwick and Parsons (2000); Knox (2002); Quigley and Kuhne (1997); Rose and Leahy (1997); Comments: see streaming video conversations 13 on evaluation strategies with Terry Gibson and 14 on ongoing assessment with Jon Aleckson. 4/10/06 Session on Unit H and earlier units (videoconference) 4/17/06 I. CONTEXT Basic questions for all students 19
  20. 20. 1. What are major relationships between provider functioning and local, national and international context? 2. How might educational leaders address societal influences? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 669-693; 634-646 Merriam and Brockett (1997) pp. 13-15, 89-94, 161-168. Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 71-76, 615-633. Altbach, Berdhal, Gumport (1999) pp. 370-393 Stud. Serv. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 272-284 Altbach, Berdhal, Gumport (1999) pp. 448-465 Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 647-657. Cont. Educ. - Knox (1993) pp. 470-998 Alfred (2002) pp. 89-95 Hatcher and Storberg – Walker (2005) pp. 21-24 Hansman and Sissel (2001) pp. 17-27, 55-62, 85-93 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers) Alfred (2002); Blackburn (1994); Galbraith and Sisco (1992); Knox (2003) 20
  21. 21. Comments: see streaming video conversations 15 on societal context with Al Phelps, and 16 on future directions with Betty Hayes 4/24/06 J. FUTURES Basic questions for all students 1. What are likely future directions for various types of providers? 2. What are major challenges for educational leaders related to reform? Basic readings for all students Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 508-525. Merriam and Brockett (1997) pp. 149-159, 243-246, 268-275, 283-289. Specialized readings (on four themes) Hi. Ed. Adm. -Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 483-498. -NASPA standards (2005) pp 1-4 -ACPA standards (1996) pp. 1-8 -Taylors Teaching Accademy (1997, 2002) 26 pages Stud. Serv. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 136-147. 21
  22. 22. Sch. Staff Dev. - Bess and Webster (1999) pp. 663-668. Goodchild and Wechsler (1997) pp. 510-527. Cont. Educ. - Cervero (2001) pp 16-30 - Guy (1999) pp 93-98 - Hayes and Colin (1994) pp 5-16, 53-62 Supplemental beyond text and E-reserves (for papers) Brockett and Hiemstra (2004); Elias and Merriam (20050); Jarvis (1999); Wise and Glowacki – Dudka (2004) Comments: Report 3 on inquiry due by end of Unit J (4/24/06) See streaming video conversations 17 on strategic planning with George Mejicano and 18 on Teaching Academy with Jim Taylor. 5/1/06 Concluding session (videoconference) VII Individualization This is a rationale for several ways in which students can individualize the course and adapt it to fit their backgrounds and career directions. The resultant individual plans, activities, and assessments are similar to a learning agreement or portfolio. The overall course plan encourages student interaction with the content, instructor, resource persons, and other students. A student, the lead instructor, and other resource persons contribute to preparation and revision of the plan, and assessment of progress. The intent of the following aspects is to deepen new insights and encourage application and implementation. A. Information - The course syllabus and webpage contain information to enable each student to select relevant materials and people. B. Form – The ELPA 701 course webpage includes a Participant Information Survey Form 22
  23. 23. for each student to complete and email at the time of registration and before the first course session. (See Section VII B) The form includes pertinent background information along with learning goals and expectations for the course experience. Each student is encouraged to email to the instructor and all other students a brief (250 words or less) introduction that includes Name, email address, and an indication of pertinent background experience, and current roles) expectations for what you would like to gain from the course. Revision of this information form typically occurs as the course progresses. The student, lead instructor, and others / students, resource persons (in faculty or practitioner roles) can contribute to planning, revision, and feedback. Highlights from the three course reports, and reflections about them, are added to this preliminary plan to constitute the course portfolio. C. Resource Persons – This ELPA 701 course encourages contributions by resource persons related to each of the four themes. Each student should begin with resource persons that know about in faculty or practitioner roles (including other course participants). Resource persons can help individualize and enrich a student’s course experience in several ways including: suggestions about course related topics, people, and materials; serving as an interviewee for report 2; and comments on course reports. Each student should send names of proposed resource persons to the lead instructor to help assure a satisfactory match. The lead instructor can provide contact information for potential resource persons who have agreed to help in this way. D. Reports – Details on the three course reports from students along with assessment criteria are as follows. (1) ARTICLE 23
  24. 24. a. Purpose- To select and critique an article or equivalent excerpt related to the theme selected by the student, which is beyond readings specified in the ELPA 701 syllabus. b. Due- at the end of Unit E (2/20/06) c. Report in the following parts: 1. FAX or email actual article or major excerpts (up to 10 pages), which can include annotations or comments on passages of special interest. 2. Reflections and critique of up to 500 words focused on selected comments regarding importance, agreement, disagreement, and implications. 3. Summary of up to 250 words suitable to distribute to others such as students and resource persons d. Aspects to guide report and assessment 1. Selection of article that is important and relevant in relation to theme and course Units B, C, D 2. Reference in critique to course related concepts and readings. 3. Reflection on major implications for practice or research e. Twenty percent of course grade (2) INTERVIEW a. Purpose – to explore with someone with educational leadership experience, their perspectives on selected important issues, and reflect on implications for student’s career development (This interview may be with a resource person.) b. Due- at the end of Unit G (3/20/06) c. Report in the following parts: 1. Overview (500 words or less) of the main ideas from the interview, that are 24
  25. 25. relevant to course purpose and student interest. 2. Discussion (up to 500 words) to include reflections on important topics from the interview in relation to course content and readings as well as student purpose and career development. 3. Summary of up to 250 words, suitable to distribute to others. d. Aspects to guide report and assessment 1. Clarification of purpose and relevance of interview to educational leadership and student’s career development. 2. Reference in discussion to course related concepts and readings. 3. Fit between purpose, information, and conclusions 4. Main conclusions and implications. e. Twenty percent of course grade. (3) INQUIRY a. Purpose – to conduct and report on a focused and relevant inquiry project (research or evaluation) b. Due – Next to last course session (4/24/06) c. Report length up to 5,000 words (20 double spaced pages) with sections such as the following. 1. Executive Summary 2. Introduction to the purpose and importance of the inquiry 3. Rationale for inquiry based on preliminary review of major recent pertinent writings 4. Methods and procedures for collecting and analyzing data 25
  26. 26. 5. Major findings, conclusions, and discussion related to rationale. 6. References d. Aspects to guide report and assessment 1. Clear statement of inquiry question purpose and topic 2. Justification of importance of inquiry 3. Identification of major relevant writings 4. Indication of relations among concepts in rationale that can help explain topic 5. Use of inquiry methods appropriate for purpose and topic. 6. Presentation of findings conclusions and implications. e. Fifty percent of course grade (4) PROGRESS REPORTS – Submit at the conclusion of the week before discussion for each unit (B-J) a progress report of up to 250 words which indicates readings completed, main benefits, reflections on career related implication, and especially questions for Monday class discussion. (Due by Friday noon) All nine reports together, ten percent of course grade. These progress reports can contribute to the three course reports, the summaries of which can contribute to a total course portfolio. (5) Assessment Project The following cooperative project is proposed for interested students, based on readings and concepts from unit H on assessment. The basic materials are from the Baldrige National Quality Program, and from DVD recordings of interviews with Wisconsin scholars and practitioners familiar with use of Baldrige procedures (especially conversation12 with Phil Meissen). Interested students could be from any location, be focused on one of the course themes 26
  27. 27. (such as PK-12 schools, WTCS, or university) and could interact by email, computer conferencing and telephone conference call. Baldrige materials can be downloaded from <www.baldrige.nist.gov> Examples include: A. 2005 Education Criteria for Performance Excellence (esp. pp. 5-14) which could apply to elementary, secondary, or higher education. B. Two page - Application Self-Analysis Worksheet C. Three page – Are we making progress as leaders (questionnaire with 40 statements on the seven criteria categories.) For students who are interested in WTCS administration, there is the Coyote Community College Case Study, which can be critiqued. Students who elect to participate in a cooperative assessment project, can use this as their third report (paper) and can share highlights with all course enrollees in an open session in the later course units, including Unit H on assessment. 27
  28. 28. (6) Survey ELPA 701 (spring 2006) Survey Information A. Before or soon after start of semester (student responses) email address, phone number 1. Contact information (Name, Student Number, email address, phone number) 2. Indicate the extent and type of education and experience that provides preparation for 701. 1 (low) 2 3 4(high) Comments and examples: 3. List your main expectations and objectives that you hope to achieve in 701: ____________________________________________________________________ _ ____________________________________________________________________ _ ____________________________________________________________________ _ B. Periodic student feedback during course (1 or 2 times) Low High 1. Syllabus and plan Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 2. Text, readings, video Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 3. Importance of course content Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 4. Student interaction, discussion Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 5. Opportunities for active learning Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 6. Instructor contributions Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 7. Instructional technology Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 8. General value and benefits Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 9. Most beneficial aspects Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 10. Could be strengthened Comments: ______________________________ 1 2 3 4 28
  29. 29. C. Criteria for Instructor Assessment of Written Reports Low High 1. Clear Focus and Purpose of Report 1 2 3 4 2. Importance of Content Related to Educational Leadership 1 2 3 4 3. Identification of Course Related Concepts and Writings 1 2 3 4 4. Depth of Analysis 1 2 3 4 5. Evidence of Reflection 1 2 3 4 6. Implications for Practice or Research 1 2 3 4 D. Electronic Version of ELPA Course Evaluation Form IX. Bibliography: A consolidated course bibliography with full citations allows reference in each unit by use of the names of author/editor and date. Included are: the two textbooks, all other basic readings, suggested specialized readings related to the four themes, and supplemental readings that students may consult as they plan written projects. See Section XI for bibliography. X. DVD Conversations 1. University Outreach Mary S. Grant, Associate Dean Outreach, E-Learning Media University of Wisconsin- Extension. Extension administrative roles since 1983. UWEX website <www.uwex.edu> 2. Student Services Jerlando F.L. Jackson, UW faculty member in ELPA, teaches courses on higher education administration and on student services 3. Community Colleges L. Allen Phelps, US faculty member in ELPA and Director, UW-Madison Center on Education and Work. Website <www.cew.wisc.edu> 4. Collaboration Mary S. Grant, Associate Dean Outreach, E-Learning Media University of Wisconsin- Extension. Extension administrative roles since 1983. UWEX website <www.uwex.edu> 5. Adult Learning Elisabeth R. Hayes, UW faculty member in ELPA and in Curriculum and Instruction, teaches courses on adult learners, gender, and digital technologies. 6. Learning Community James J. Shaw, UW faculty member in ELPA, teaches and coordinates master administrator program. 7. Faculty Development 29
  30. 30. Brent Nelson, Executive Director eTech College of Wisconsin, WTCS, coordinates certificate courses for WTCS faculty, website <www.etechcollege.org> 8. Various Providers Rosemary Lehman, Senior Outreach Specialist, UW Extension, Instructional Communication, assists instructors in various organizations with teaching and learning at a distance. 9. Staff Development Amy Wick, Coordinator, Organizational Development, UW Credit Union, coordinates human resource development activities that use various methods of instruction. 10. Various Methods Chere Campbell Gibson, Professor Emeritus, UW school of Human Ecology, teaching and scholarship on adult learning and teaching at a distance. 11. School Development Paul V. Bredeson, Chair, ELPA, teaches courses on PK-12 school faculty and staff development, publications include Designs for Learning: A New Architecture for Professional Development in Schools (2003). 12. Quality Improvement Philip Meissen, school principal, McFarland, research on use of Baldridge quality criteria for leadership and student achievement. 13. Evaluation Strategies Terry L. Gibson, Professor Emeritus, UW School of Human Ecology and Extension, experience with leadership regarding evaluation in distance and extension education. 14. Ongoing Assessment Jon Aleckson, CEO, Web Course Works <www.webcourseworks.com> manages eLearning development projects and media production for various enterprises 15. Societal Content L. Allen Phelps, UW faculty member in ELPA and Director, UW-Madison Center on Education and Work. Website <www.cew.wisc.edu> 16. Future Directions Elisabeth R. Hayes, UW faculty member in ELPA and in Curriculum and Instruction, teaches courses on adult learners and on literacy, gender, and digital technologies. 17. Strategic Planning George Mejicano,. Physician and asst. Dean, UW Continuing Medical Education, has used broadly based strategic planning to strengthen a vital program. Website <www.cme.wisc.edu> 18. Teaching Academy James W. Taylor is Emeritus John Bascom Professor of Chemistry at UW-Madison, and was founding member of the UW–Madison Teaching Academy, which was a pioneering way to enhance university teaching. 19. Odyssey, Pt. 1 Emily Auerbach is UW professor of English and Liberal studies and arts through outreach, and Director, Odyssey Project. 20. Odyssey, Pt. 2 Emily Auerbach is UW professor of English and Liberal studies and arts through outreach, and Director, Odyssey Project. 30
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