Leave No Child Inside! A Study of ECE Outdoor Program Environments Click mouse to advance slide Harvest Resources www.ecet...
How do you think about playgrounds for children? Do you see them as places to blow-off steam, giving children a break from...
In his important book,  Last Child in the Woods: Saving Children from Nature Deficit Disorder , Richard Louv reminds us th...
The out-of-doors offers a larger world for children.  It can provide places for freedom, exploring, and solace. Being in n...
Likewise, there are human costs that come with alienation from nature. Today’s children are experiencing the symptoms: str...
Well designed playgrounds help change these conditions for children—reducing stress, sharpening their concentration, and p...
Beyond safety guidelines and risk management, this study guide invites you to consider these elements when planning outdoo...
Connecting Children to Nature
Why is the natural world important for children? <ul><li>Learning to notice the details of texture, color, smell, and soun...
<ul><li>Learning to notice the details… </li></ul>
What colors & textures can you find? How would you feel in this place?
 
 
 
 
Finding  one’s  place in the cycle of life
 
<ul><li>Becoming a steward of plants and creatures </li></ul>
 
 
 
<ul><li>Finding the joys of water, dirt, & sand </li></ul>
Moving water
 
 
Adding more dimensions
INSPIRATION
Conserving water with  a dog lick
Sand beyond the box
 
 
 
 
 
And don’t forget… the value of dirt
And the joys of excavation!
Landscaping for Adventure and Drama
Landscaping for adventure and drama Look around your outdoor play area.   <ul><li>Are there places that </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Building in  pathways
 
guide children to journeys, mysteries, destinations, and discoveries. Pathways
 
draw children  to explore, soar, and discover how to focus their physical energy and imagination. Pathways
INSPIRATION
 
 
Where could you add a pathway in your play area?
INSPIRATION
Adding platforms
 
 
Places to get up
 
Places to get under
 
Creating places to feel powerful and competent
<ul><li>Building muscles </li></ul>
 
Building confidence
Building imaginations
 
INSPIRATION
INSPIRATION
Learning to keep yourself safe when you take risks
INSPIRATION
Designing cozy spaces & gathering places
The outdoors is not just for big energy, but also for relaxing, letting nature be your nest.
 
Do you have cozy places in your play yard?
Places where a few can gather ?
 
INSPIRATION
INSPIRATION
Places for an audience when it’s time for a show?
INSPIRATION
 
 
 
Being in the fresh air clears your head and opens your heart.
Enhancing play with  props & activities
When you bring indoor things outside,  you expand the possibilities with A different quality of light More space Less worr...
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loose parts can travel and become tools, forts, props for representing ideas and extending dramas.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Defining spaces for people and things
Some final thoughts about outdoor environments Fences and gates should not only protect a playground, but also foster good...
 
 
 
Even when your space is small, you can plan for different interest areas.
 
Storage systems
 
 
Clean-up systems
 
And, one more thing…
Create outdoor spaces for families and teachers too!
 
As you study the ideas here begin to make a plan for your program. What can you do differently tomorrow? What could you ha...
Leave no child inside. For further inspiration, read Richard Louv (2006),  Last Child in the Woods. Saving Our Children fr...
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Leave No Child Inside

  1. 1. Leave No Child Inside! A Study of ECE Outdoor Program Environments Click mouse to advance slide Harvest Resources www.ecetrainers.com
  2. 2. How do you think about playgrounds for children? Do you see them as places to blow-off steam, giving children a break from the important lessons you plan for your classroom? Leave No Child Inside invites you to transform conventional thinking about outdoor environments, and to plan them as thoughtfully as your indoor environments for learning.
  3. 3. In his important book, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Children from Nature Deficit Disorder , Richard Louv reminds us that unlike television (and we might add school), nature does not steal time. It amplifies it. It offers new possibilities.
  4. 4. The out-of-doors offers a larger world for children. It can provide places for freedom, exploring, and solace. Being in natural outdoor environments helps children thrive not only physically, but socially, emotionally, intellectually, and spiritually.
  5. 5. Likewise, there are human costs that come with alienation from nature. Today’s children are experiencing the symptoms: stress, obesity, fear, depression, and ADHD.
  6. 6. Well designed playgrounds help change these conditions for children—reducing stress, sharpening their concentration, and promoting creative problem solving. We can nurture children’s enthusiasm for the out-of-doors and their commitment to protecting nature for generations to come.
  7. 7. Beyond safety guidelines and risk management, this study guide invites you to consider these elements when planning outdoor environments for young children: <ul><ul><li>Connecting children to nature </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Caring for plants and creatures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Landscaping for adventure and drama </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating places to feel powerful & competent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Designing cozy spaces and gathering places </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhancing play with props and activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Defining spaces for people and things </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Connecting Children to Nature
  9. 9. Why is the natural world important for children? <ul><li>Learning to notice the details of texture, color, smell, and sound </li></ul><ul><li>Finding one’s place in the cycle of life </li></ul><ul><li>Becoming a steward of plants and creatures </li></ul><ul><li>Finding the joys of water, dirt, and sand </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Learning to notice the details… </li></ul>
  11. 11. What colors & textures can you find? How would you feel in this place?
  12. 16. Finding one’s place in the cycle of life
  13. 18. <ul><li>Becoming a steward of plants and creatures </li></ul>
  14. 22. <ul><li>Finding the joys of water, dirt, & sand </li></ul>
  15. 23. Moving water
  16. 26. Adding more dimensions
  17. 27. INSPIRATION
  18. 28. Conserving water with a dog lick
  19. 29. Sand beyond the box
  20. 35. And don’t forget… the value of dirt
  21. 36. And the joys of excavation!
  22. 37. Landscaping for Adventure and Drama
  23. 38. Landscaping for adventure and drama Look around your outdoor play area. <ul><li>Are there places that </li></ul><ul><ul><li>engage a sense of wonder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>provoke curiosity and a desire to investigate? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can children do the work of </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a scientist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>an ecologist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>or archeologist? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can they </li></ul><ul><ul><li>conquer fears, take risks, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>develop courage and become heroes? </li></ul></ul>
  24. 39. Building in pathways
  25. 41. guide children to journeys, mysteries, destinations, and discoveries. Pathways
  26. 43. draw children to explore, soar, and discover how to focus their physical energy and imagination. Pathways
  27. 44. INSPIRATION
  28. 47. Where could you add a pathway in your play area?
  29. 48. INSPIRATION
  30. 49. Adding platforms
  31. 52. Places to get up
  32. 54. Places to get under
  33. 56. Creating places to feel powerful and competent
  34. 57. <ul><li>Building muscles </li></ul>
  35. 59. Building confidence
  36. 60. Building imaginations
  37. 62. INSPIRATION
  38. 63. INSPIRATION
  39. 64. Learning to keep yourself safe when you take risks
  40. 65. INSPIRATION
  41. 66. Designing cozy spaces & gathering places
  42. 67. The outdoors is not just for big energy, but also for relaxing, letting nature be your nest.
  43. 69. Do you have cozy places in your play yard?
  44. 70. Places where a few can gather ?
  45. 72. INSPIRATION
  46. 73. INSPIRATION
  47. 74. Places for an audience when it’s time for a show?
  48. 75. INSPIRATION
  49. 79. Being in the fresh air clears your head and opens your heart.
  50. 80. Enhancing play with props & activities
  51. 81. When you bring indoor things outside, you expand the possibilities with A different quality of light More space Less worry about mess.
  52. 88. Loose parts can travel and become tools, forts, props for representing ideas and extending dramas.
  53. 96. Defining spaces for people and things
  54. 97. Some final thoughts about outdoor environments Fences and gates should not only protect a playground, but also foster good feelings. Define each outdoor play area as carefully as you do indoor areas. Create storage and clean up systems in convenient locations.
  55. 101. Even when your space is small, you can plan for different interest areas.
  56. 103. Storage systems
  57. 106. Clean-up systems
  58. 108. And, one more thing…
  59. 109. Create outdoor spaces for families and teachers too!
  60. 111. As you study the ideas here begin to make a plan for your program. What can you do differently tomorrow? What could you have in place in a month? What is your goal for the next few years? <ul><ul><li>Connecting children to nature </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Caring for plants and creatures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Landscaping for adventure and drama </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating places to feel powerful & competent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Designing cozy spaces and gathering places </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhancing play with props and activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Defining spaces for people and things </li></ul></ul>
  61. 112. Leave no child inside. For further inspiration, read Richard Louv (2006), Last Child in the Woods. Saving Our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder NY: Algonguin You can prevent nature deficit disorder! Visit Harvest Resources for ongoing information. www.ecetrainers.com

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