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Early Childhood Classroom Management - Responding to Inappropriate Behavior

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This presentation helps you understand reasons behind misbehavior of children, types of misbehavior, common interventions to be avoided, and the needed actions to implement.
Namaste.

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Early Childhood Classroom Management - Responding to Inappropriate Behavior

  1. 1. inappropriate behavior Responding to Mr. Ronald Macanip Quileste, MAEd Xavier University – Ateneo de Cagayan
  2. 2. Outline Interventions Three Step Response Plan Dealing with Chronic Misbehavior Chapter Activity
  3. 3. intervention
  4. 4. intervention is an action done by the teacher to stop disruptive behavior
  5. 5. The principle of least intervention
  6. 6. The principle of least intervention According to Slavin (2009) teachers should deal misbehavior with the simplest. Least intrusive interventions that work.
  7. 7. Three Step Response Plan using the principle of least intervention
  8. 8. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement
  9. 9. Harsh and Humiliating Reprimands
  10. 10. Threats
  11. 11. Nagging
  12. 12. Forced Apologies
  13. 13. Sarcastic Remarks
  14. 14. Group Punishment
  15. 15. Assigning Extra Academic Work
  16. 16. Reducing Grades
  17. 17. Writing as Punishment
  18. 18. Physical Labor or Exercise
  19. 19. Corporal Punishment
  20. 20. factors To consider When using punishment
  21. 21. Discuss and Reward Acceptable Behaviors
  22. 22. Clearly Specify the Behaviors That Will Lead Punishment
  23. 23. Use Punishment Only When Rewards or Nonpunitive Interventions Have Not Worked
  24. 24. Administer Punishment in a Calm, Unemotional Manner
  25. 25. Deliver a Warning before Punishment is Applied to Any Behavior
  26. 26. Apply Punishment Fairly to Everyone who Exhibits the Targeted Behaviors
  27. 27. Apply Punishment Consistently after Everyone Who Exhibits the Targeted Behavior
  28. 28. Use Punishment of Sufficient Intensity to Suppress the Unwanted Behavior
  29. 29. Select an Effective Punishment that is Not Associated With a positive Rewarding Experience
  30. 30. Avoid Extended Periods of Punishment
  31. 31. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement
  32. 32. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement
  33. 33. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement These are actions designed to help the students cope with the instructional situation
  34. 34. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement These are actions designed to keep them on task or to get them back on task before problems worsen
  35. 35. techniques You can use To provide situational assistance
  36. 36. 1 Remove distracting objects
  37. 37. 2 Provide support with routines
  38. 38. 3 Reinforce appropriate behavior
  39. 39. 4 Boost student interest
  40. 40. 5 Provide cues
  41. 41. 6 Help students over hurdles
  42. 42. 7 Redirect the behavior
  43. 43. 8 Alter the lesson
  44. 44. 9 Provide non- punitive time- out
  45. 45. 10 Modify the classroom environment
  46. 46. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement
  47. 47. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement
  48. 48. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement These are non-punitive ways to deal with misbehavior while providing guidance for appropriate behavior
  49. 49. Nonverbal responses Verbal responsesMild responses
  50. 50. Non verbal Response techniques
  51. 51. 1 Ignore the behavior
  52. 52. 2 Use nonverbal signals
  53. 53. 3 Stand near the student
  54. 54. 4 Touch or tap the student’s shoulder
  55. 55. 1 Call on the student during the lesson
  56. 56. 2 Use humor
  57. 57. 3 Send an i-message
  58. 58. 4 Use positive phrasing
  59. 59. 5 Remind students of the rules
  60. 60. 6 Give students choices
  61. 61. 7 Ask “What should you be doing?”
  62. 62. 8 Give a verbal reprimand
  63. 63. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement
  64. 64. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement
  65. 65. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement These are intended to be punitive ways to deal with misbehavior by removing desired stimuli to decrease the occurrence of inappropriate behavior
  66. 66. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement This is an event that is arranged by the teacher that is directly and logically related to the misbehavior
  67. 67. Teacher Response Step 1 Provide Situational Assistance Step 2 Use Mild Responses Step 3 Use Moderate Responses Purpose To help the student cope with the instructional situation and keep the student on task To take non-punitive actions to get the student back on task To remove desired stimuli to decrease unwanted behavior Sample Actions 1. Remove distracting objects 2. Provide support with routines 3. Reinforce appropriate behaviors Nonverbal responses 1. Ignore the behavior 2. 2. Use nonverbal signals 3. Stand near the student Logical Consequences 1. Withdraw privileges 2. Change the seating arrangement This should be reasonable, respectful, and related to the student action
  68. 68. Logical consequences include… Withdraw Privileges
  69. 69. Logical consequences include… Change the Seat Assignment
  70. 70. Logical consequences include… Have the Student Write Reflections on the Problem
  71. 71. Logical consequences include… Place the Student in a Time-Out
  72. 72. Logical consequences include… Hold the Student for Detention
  73. 73. Logical consequences include… Contact the Family
  74. 74. Logical consequences include… Have the Student Visit the Principal
  75. 75. examples Of chronic misbehaviors And how to deal with them effectively
  76. 76. 1 Tattling
  77. 77. The Fix Inform the students ahead what kinds of information they should and should not report to you
  78. 78. 2 Clowning
  79. 79. The Fix Figure out the source of the student’s clowning
  80. 80. The Fix Keep a record of who, what, where, when, and how for clowning incidents
  81. 81. The Fix Help the student figure out ways to meet his or her needs without being disruptive
  82. 82. 3 Cheating
  83. 83. The Fix Minimize the temptation to cheat by determining the difference between HELPING and CHEATING
  84. 84. The Fix Demonstrate expected behaviors for various activities
  85. 85. The Fix Have students identify appropriate and inappropriate actions
  86. 86. The Fix Minimize the temptation to cheat by determining desk placement during tests
  87. 87. The Fix Minimize the temptation to cheat by determining policies, procedures and submission guidelines for assignments
  88. 88. If you caught a student cheating… Talk to the student privately
  89. 89. If you caught a student cheating… Present your reasons for suspecting cheating
  90. 90. If you caught a student cheating… Express concern and try to find out why the student cheated
  91. 91. If you caught a student cheating… Explain the consequences, and then discuss the consequences for subsequent cheating
  92. 92. 4 Lying
  93. 93. The Fix Identify the reasons for lying
  94. 94. to protect self-image to mask their vulnerable points to inflate their image in front of others Common reasons for lying…
  95. 95. The Fix Respond best by expressing concern about the student’s need to lie
  96. 96. The Fix Ask: I wonder why you couldn’t tell me what really happened?
  97. 97. The Fix Stay calm and encourage them to discuss why they felt they needed to tell a lie
  98. 98. The Fix Try not to overreact or get angry with the student
  99. 99. The Fix Focus on the student’s reasons and feelings that led to the lie
  100. 100. The Fix Express your intent to help the student so the act will not be repeated anymore
  101. 101. The Fix Encourage the students to be honest with their feelings
  102. 102. The Fix Use a calm problem- solving approach to help students address a problem that caused them to lie in the first place
  103. 103. 5 Stealing
  104. 104. The Fix If you know the culprit, have a private conversation with the student about what happened
  105. 105. The Fix Help the student figure out options other than stealing
  106. 106. The Fix Respond forcefully depending on the value of the property and frequency of stealing
  107. 107. The Fix It is wise to discuss an incident with the principal before conducting a search of backpacks, lockers, or a student’s clothing
  108. 108. 6 Profanity
  109. 109. The Fix Respond appropriately through instruction rather than disciplinary such as: “We don’t use words like that in school”
  110. 110. The Fix Stress that using language to hurt others will not be permitted and that there are other acceptable ways to express anger
  111. 111. 7 Rudeness Toward the Teacher
  112. 112. The Fix Avoid overreacting, arguing, or getting into a power struggle
  113. 113. The Fix A low-key respectful response is more suitable
  114. 114. The Fix When a rude behavior is exhibited, inform the student that the behavior is inappropriate
  115. 115. The Fix If symptoms persist, talk to the student privately and deliver the consequences
  116. 116. The Fix If symptoms persist enough, consult the principal or counselors about additional responses
  117. 117. 8 Defiance or Hostility Toward the Teacher
  118. 118. The Fix Deal the defiance by defusing it by keeping it in private and handing it individually with the student
  119. 119. The Fix Avoid a power struggle and remain objective
  120. 120. The Fix Listen to the student’s point of view but don’t engage in an argument
  121. 121. The Fix State the consequence clearly and implement it
  122. 122. 1 Stay in control with yourself
  123. 123. 2 Direct the rest of the class to work on something while you speak to the student in a private area away from the rest
  124. 124. 3 Stand a few feet away from the defiant student
  125. 125. 4 Acknowledge the student’s feeling by saying: “I can see that you’re really angry.”
  126. 126. 5 Avoid a power struggle in the conversation
  127. 127. 6 As a means to defuse the situation, offer the student a choice of actions for what the student needs to do next (Weinstein & Mignano, 2007)
  128. 128. 9 Failure to do Work in Class or Homework
  129. 129. The Fix Examine how you hold students accountable in your class
  130. 130. The Fix Plan to maintain accurate records of the school work and respond early when you recognize students who regularly are not completing their class work
  131. 131. The Fix Examine the nature of the assignment or homework
  132. 132. When selecting seatwork and homework, break it into parts if possible
  133. 133. Be sure to review, collect, and grade all assignments
  134. 134. Prepare a homework planner
  135. 135. Performance task
  136. 136. Goal: You need to implement a three-step response plan for a problem student. Role: Your role is a classroom teacher Audience: Your audience are the guidance counselor, grade level leader and the principal Situation: You will need to convince the audience of your three step response plan for a student who is constantly clowning and defiant in class. Product: A three-step response plan Standards: • Three – step response plan (hard copy) • Slide presentation with the three-step response plan for defense
  137. 137. Namaste!!
  138. 138. Reference: Burden, Paul R. (2010) Classroom Management: Creating a Successful K-12 Learning Community (4th Ed.) .John Wiley & Sins, Inc. , 111 River Street, Hoboken NJ 07030-5774. United States of America

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