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Designing for Openness: Values Based Organisations Place in the Digital Landscape

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Digitisation, open and online, digital innovation, digital participation, all press on and ask questions of values based organisations. Based on work with a range of Third Sector partners over a number of years this paper explores how values based organisation understand and find their place in messy landscape. Suggesting it is not always appropriate for values based organisations to adopt practices from private sector digital disruptors, as these start with different assumptions and values, but instead develop their own approaches based on their organisational values and the needs of the people they support. Using work with a range of partners in different sector, from Health and Social Care to Trade Unions the paper looks at how values based organisations have approached this tension. Sharing what has been learnt from working in partnership, and how this has informed a mutual understanding of how to design and produce digital artefacts and critically the social and situated nature of how they are used.

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Designing for Openness: Values Based Organisations Place in the Digital Landscape

  1. 1. Designing for Openness: Values Based Organisations Place in the Digital Landscape Ronald Macintyre @roughbounds Cite as: Macintyre R. (2017) “Designing for Openness: Values Based Organisations Place in the Digital Landscape”, Online Education Social Learning – A Showcase, Dublin City University, 8th of June, CC BY SA 4.0
  2. 2. Structure • Design Based Approaches • The Reality of Design Work • Listening to Learners • Values and Minding • Some Broader Patterns
  3. 3. DESIGN BASED APPROACHES
  4. 4. We Start with the value you want to create for the learner and/or your organisation rather than what you know (or think learners ought to know) and how you think we ought to communicate VALUE How What
  5. 5. Partnership, Co-Production: Designing in, for through Partnership • Starts with the Learner, use of data to profile learner – e.g front line care staff, possibly distanced from education, unfamiliar with learning online • Build a journey based on their needs, think about where they are, their context, experience, where they want to go • Builds on the resources and capabilities you bring and/or want to develop – strategic and operational alignment What Learners Want Resources and Capabilities of the Organisation The learner Journey
  6. 6. Exploring Learners Journeys: Exercise 1 Think about the learner and think about the value you want to create, the nature of the transformation • Draw out an “rich picture” of your “ideal” [transitional/workplace] learner • Draw out a “rich picture” of your “actual” learner Ideal Learner Actual Learners The learner Journey
  7. 7. Exploring Learning Journeys: Exercise 2 • The ideal learner tells us a great deal about the resources and capabilities of the organisation – it is often what they are good at delivering • The actual learner also tells us a great deal about the resources and capabilities • [often] both highlight the limits of our knowledge about learners needs and wants Ideal Learner Actual Learners The learner Journey
  8. 8. Linked Phases of Content Production • Know the Learner • Map the Learners Journey • Planning/Structure the Learning Journey Design Phase • Collating • CreatingWriting Phase • Technical ProductionProduction Phase • Qualitative and QuantitativeEvaluation Phase
  9. 9. For example … Live Course Production Authoring Collating and Review Designing At least 2 design workshops Diverse and consistent design team Set homework between meetings Clear design brief, 2 to 3 drafts, Continuous Contact, Shared Spaces, (AV, IP & Assessment can take longer) Technical production, Minimal changes,
  10. 10. THE REALITY OF DESIGN WORK
  11. 11. Designing for Openness Need to “know” your learners, but it is more than a simple customer/consumer relationship Value(s) [personal, professional, organisational] What is Transformed [Learners] How it is to be tranformed [the learning journey]
  12. 12. Designing for Openness Past mistakes: earlier iterations we had focussed on the transformation of the learner, and in doing not HOW, or the implications for change, or the relationship to organisational values Value(s) [personal, professional, organisational] What is Transformed [Learners] How it is to be transformed [the learning journey]
  13. 13. Designing for Openness Accept the value even when you have tried to account for the value for the learner, the value is learning comes into being when enacted, it is uncertain. Value(s) [personal, professional, organisational] What is Transformed [Learners] How it is to be tranformed [the learning journey]
  14. 14. Reflections on our Practice
  15. 15. Reflections on our Practice
  16. 16. Reflections on our Practice Interview Themes • Take care over the course because they care about people, course has high retention; • Seeing things in new ways – better advocates, but not always recognised; • Asking difficult questions about local support
  17. 17. Openness Technology and Change • Lets not pretend its neat. • You can use open online to reach people, but … • Open online can be used strategically to colonise a public space discourse – go to places
  18. 18. Openness Technology and Change • Lets not pretend its easy • Blurring the boundaries around an organisation creates tensions at operational level • Partnership asks questions at a strategic level, organisation sense of self as site of knowledge
  19. 19. LISTENING TO LEARNERS
  20. 20. Scottish Union Learn The Gap in provision ... • Employer and funding pressure meant offer was increasingly focussed on work related learning • Why Mind .. • Values of the organisation, focus on collective models of learning and lifelong learning, beyond instrumental values Gathered as part of Open Educational Practices Scotland – see herehttps://oepscotland.org/2015/10/22/oeps-working-with- scottish-union-learn-education-champions/
  21. 21. Scottish Union Learn What difference did open make • developing new education opportunities and support digital participation • The approach – built on organisational values, self directed and social support, collective learning, • Still digital challenges, employers attitude, capacity to support those that are supporting others in the workplace Gathered as part of Open Educational Practices Scotland – see herehttps://oepscotland.org/2015/10/22/oeps-working-with- scottish-union-learn-education-champions/
  22. 22. Emerging Patterns and Practices Partnership with “trusted sources” embedding openness in context, it works, Challenging notions of open as only “self directed” through social and collective approaches Macintyre R. (2015) Union Learning Workshop: Glasgow, CC BY NC SA 4.0Gathered as part of Open Educational Practices Scotland – see herehttps://oepscotland.org/2015/10/22/oeps-working-with- scottish-union-learn-education-champions/
  23. 23. VALUES AND MINDING
  24. 24. Reflection on Value(s) • What is the relationship with the state and “Public Value”? • Third Sector organisations can act as spaces of resistance to dominant/ing discourses from private and public sector • .. .while also getting funding to make things “freely available”
  25. 25. Reflection on Value(s) • For values based organisations values inform “the way we do things around here” • This means applying models with assumptions of about value (e.g. shareholder), or the nature of the “customer” interactions might not be appropriate • Design based approaches need to be applied with care, they have their own assumptions, esp. about needs
  26. 26. Minding the Gap • Digression into what it means to mind • Common usage, to be careful • In Scots, to recall or remember, • e.g. Begbie on the overnight bus to London in Trainspotting, “Did you mind the cards” Bluewhale646 (2013) Francis Begbie, http://villains.wikia.com/wiki/File:Francis_Begbie.jpg, CC BY SA
  27. 27. Minding • Holes in Provision • Work on failings of Public and Market suggest we read those failing through their absent presence • Work on Third Sector and on Values based organisations suggests we see their role as filling structural holes • A shared sense of “minding”, of concern, or caring about the gaps in peoples learning journeys – remember to care.
  28. 28. SOME BROADER PATTERNS
  29. 29. Emerging Patterns and PracticesGrowing Interest from values based organisations in free open online Agree Disagree II would like to use free open online content to support my clients Gathered as part of Open Educational Practices Scotland – see here https://oepscotland.org/ Participants were asked to place a dot on an imaginary line between the two positions at the SCVO event “The Gathering”, the largest Third Sector event in Europe, (n=52) Emerging Patterns and Practices
  30. 30. Emerging Patterns and Practices Growing Interest from values based organisations in free open online I am confident in my own ability to use free open online content as part of my role Agree Disagree Gathered as part of Open Educational Practices Scotland – see here https://oepscotland.org/ Participants were asked to place a dot on an imaginary line between the two positions at the SCVO event “The Gathering”, the largest Third Sector event in Europe, (n=52)
  31. 31. Emerging Patterns and Practices Concerns Agree Disagree I am worried if we move towards using too many digital materials the people I support will be excluded Gathered as part of Open Educational Practices Scotland – see here https://oepscotland.org/ Participants were asked to place a dot on an imaginary line between the two positions at the SCVO event “The Gathering”, the largest Third Sector event in Europe, (n=52)
  32. 32. Emerging Patterns and Practices Concerns Agree Disagree I think my organisation is taking a leadership role in the development and use of online content Gathered as part of Open Educational Practices Scotland – see here https://oepscotland.org/ Participants were asked to place a dot on an imaginary line between the two positions at the SCVO event “The Gathering”, the largest Third Sector event in Europe, (n=52)
  33. 33. Questions – if time
  34. 34. Acknowledgements • Much of the work presented here would not have been possible without funding from the Scottish Government for Open Educational Practices Scotland (OEPS) a programme hosted by the OU in Scotland, and special thanks to Pete Cannell the Director of OEPS. • The team at Parkinson’s UK, in particular Claire Hewitt who has been an important influence on this work. • The team at Scottish Union Learn, in particular Tommy Breslin for helping me get close to and understand workplace learning.
  35. 35. Centre for Voluntary Sector Leadership The Open University Business School The Open University Walton Hall Milton Keynes MK7 6AA www.open.ac.uk

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