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Global
Connectedness
Sources: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2011
Concept based on WORLD 3.0 Global prosperity and how to...
World is flat.
The world is one huge market.
Anything or anyone can go anywhere, anytime.
Do you think this is true?
Are t...
Global Connectedness – Goods & Service Trade
In comparison to total economic activity (GDP), what percent is global?
When ...
Global Connectedness – Merchandise & Service Trade
With both merchandise and service international trade at only 30% of th...
Japan’s Global Connectedness – Merchandise & Service Trade
Japan’s external trade ratio is well below the average. It
is m...
USA’s Global Connectedness – Merchandise & Service Trade
The United States’ external trade ratio is below the
average. It ...
China’s Global Connectedness – Merchandise & Service Trade
The China’s external trade ratio is closer to the average. This...
Global Connectedness – Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)
Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2011
FDI
peeked in
2000
20%...
Global Connectedness – Financial Movement
Source: “Home Bias in International Equity Portfolios: A Review (August 2007)
Fo...
Global Connectedness – Communication & Information
20%
of all internet connections are international.
5%
of all phone call...
53/140
Bits per second per
internet user
International calls
International email
63/140
Outward per minutes/capita
112/140...
Global Connectedness – Visiting foreign countries
1.9%
Of Japanese
population is
from another
country.
Source: UN report T...
United Arab Emirates 7,826,981 83.7
Singapore 2,323,252 42.9
Switzerland 2,438,702 28.9
Israel 2,046,873 26.5
New Zealand ...
World 0.0
Business interaction & trade in one city
Source: Concept based on WORLD 3.0 Global prosperity and how to
achieve...
Business interaction and trade from
village to area to whole state
The village starts to connect with other villages, trad...
Business interaction & trade within a state to the whole nation
The villages in the state continue to expand their connect...
National business interaction & trade
World 1.0
We now enter the world of “World 1.0” in which a country tries to trade
as...
Regional business interaction & trade
As time passes, a country learns that it is influenced by its neighbors.
Therefore, ...
World 0.0
Business interaction & trade in one city
Source: Concept based on WORLD 3.0 Global prosperity and how
to achieve...
World 1.0
Business interaction & trade in one city
The village starts to connect with other villages, trade with each othe...
National business interaction & trade
World 1.0
We now enter the world of “World 1.0” in which a country tries to trade
as...
TPP business interaction & trade
(TPP-Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade)
There are 11 countries in talks now. Japan and...
Global business interaction & trade
World 2.0
With the internet and inexpensive global communications some believe
we are ...
What is World 3.0?
World 3.0
It is not World 0.0, World 1.0 or World 2.0. It is World 3.0.
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPE...
World 3.0 – Looking at connection differently
World 3.0
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
What onl...
CAGE - Differences
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
G-Geographic – How great are the geographic d...
C- Cultural Differences
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
Social/ethnic networks – How great are s...
A- Administrative Differences
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
Trade Bloc – Are the countries in ...
G- Geographic Distance
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
Common Border – Is there a common border ...
E- Economic Distance
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
Natural resources – Are there concerns over...
Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness
Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages
Which C...
New Zealand’s Conclusion
Countries to deepen R & D contact
Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages
Wh...
New Zealand’s Conclusion
Countries to deepen FDI with
Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages
Which C...
New Zealand’s Conclusion
Non-economic promotion to select countries
Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Li...
New Zealand’s Conclusion
Immigration-Concerns
Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages
Which Countries...
New Zealand’s Conclusion
Immigration-Concerns
Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages
Which Countries...
New Zealand’s Conclusion
Immigration - Emigration
Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness
New Zealander livi...
Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages
Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2...
New Zealand’s Conclusion
Countries to deepen Trade
Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages
Which Coun...
What global connectedness offers (ADDING)
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
A – Adding production ...
Global connectedness and pollution
Pollution
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
Most ecological pro...
Global connectedness and foreign funding
Financial
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
Foreign direc...
Global connectedness and food supply/price risks
World food
Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
Glob...
Global connectedness and unemployment
Source:
World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT
Globalization has not caus...
Global connectedness and military conflict
Globalization offers diversification and choices. These choices promote
underst...
Healthy competition
Where there is learning,
product development,
personnel development,
long-term strategy
development an...
Global Connectedness Resistance
Source: Concept based on WORLD 3.0 Global prosperity and how
to achieve it, Harvard Busine...
Global Connectedness
stimulates local growth
Connecting
factors
Merchandise/service
trade (35%)
Cross-boarder capital
move...
Thank You
Global
Connectedness
The more we connect, the better we communicate.
The more we communicate, the greater we tru...
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Global Collaborating Creates Prosperity

There is a lot of talk about protecting America from foreign influence in the US lately whether it be Latin America, the Middle East or Asia. That will only weaken the US, as trade has created great prosperity for the US, whether in wealth creation, pollution reduction, food supply increase, job creation or war prevention. Global collaboration is the best way to create prosperity and a better standard of living for everyone. People will have to be willing to adjust to change though. Ask any respectable economist. I did some research on this a good two years ago, but it is still valid today. Review this presentation. Imagine the past and think about what can be achieved in the future. We just have to start connecting and collaborating more globally. When language barriers come down with advances in translation technology, we will reach heights that no one had ever dreamed of. I hope this presentation gets people thinking.

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Global Collaborating Creates Prosperity

  1. 1. Global Connectedness Sources: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2011 Concept based on WORLD 3.0 Global prosperity and how to achieve it, Harvard Business Review Press, Copyright, 2011 1 NAFTA LAFTA EU ASEAN
  2. 2. World is flat. The world is one huge market. Anything or anyone can go anywhere, anytime. Do you think this is true? Are there barriers to connectedness? 2
  3. 3. Global Connectedness – Goods & Service Trade In comparison to total economic activity (GDP), what percent is global? When asked about global interaction, the traditional data to compare a country’s external merchandise/service trade with it’s total GDP. So, lets start there. Global Trade 3 Total GDP
  4. 4. Global Connectedness – Merchandise & Service Trade With both merchandise and service international trade at only 30% of the world GDP, there is still a great deal of growth potential. This 30% could actually be closer to 20% if you consider re-exporting of semi-finished products exported to another country for final processing and supplied to the end user. We could be connected a great deal more. 1930 9% of GDP 2011 30% of GDP Growth in trade connectedness Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2012 4
  5. 5. Japan’s Global Connectedness – Merchandise & Service Trade Japan’s external trade ratio is well below the average. It is mainly due to it large domestic market. It has much room for expansion. Outward 15% of GDP Inward 16% of GDP Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2016 From worldwide suppliers To worldwide markets 5
  6. 6. USA’s Global Connectedness – Merchandise & Service Trade The United States’ external trade ratio is below the average. It is mainly due to it large domestic market too. It can expand much more. Outward 8% of GDP Inward 13% of GDP Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2016 USA From worldwide suppliers To worldwide markets 6
  7. 7. China’s Global Connectedness – Merchandise & Service Trade The China’s external trade ratio is closer to the average. This might be one of the main reasons China has such high growth. It is helped by valuable imports and it is financed by exports. In the future, serving the domestic market will become more important as wealth is created. Outward 21% of GDP Inward 15% of GDP Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2016 China From worldwide suppliers To worldwide markets 7
  8. 8. Global Connectedness – Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2011 FDI peeked in 2000 20% of capital formation Foreign direct investment (FDI) to capital formation (Total investment in fixed assets) FDI settled in 2010 10% of capital formation FDI fell in 2007 15% of capital formation There is great global economic benefits of FDI (financial transfer, technical transfer, business knowhow transfer, etc.) 8
  9. 9. Global Connectedness – Financial Movement Source: “Home Bias in International Equity Portfolios: A Review (August 2007) Foreign equity investment (share purchase only) Foreign equity investment 2005 ~ 2007 20% of all investments There is much room for foreigners investing in foreign companies. It trust and better communication continues to grow so should investment. 9
  10. 10. Global Connectedness – Communication & Information 20% of all internet connections are international. 5% of all phone calls are international. Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2011 We could communicate and share information much more than we are now. This would build trust, investment and greater prosperity. 10
  11. 11. 53/140 Bits per second per internet user International calls International email 63/140 Outward per minutes/capita 112/140 Inward per minutes/capita Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2012 (World ranking among 140 countries (99% of world GDP and 95% of population) Japan’s Global Ranking – Telephone/Internet Communication Of 140 countries Outward calls Inward calls 11 Outward email data Inward email data
  12. 12. Global Connectedness – Visiting foreign countries 1.9% Of Japanese population is from another country. Source: UN report Trends in International Migrant Stock: The 2015 Revision. 14.3% Of USA population is from another country. Connecting face-to-face What percent of the world population are from foreign countries? 3% of the world population live outside of their home country. What percent of the world population have studied in a foreign country? 2% of university student have studied outside their country. What professionals are foreigners in the US? 33% of USA engineers are from foreign countries. 27% of USA mathematician, statisticians and computer science specialists are from foreign countries. 24% of USA scientists and researches are from foreign countries. 12
  13. 13. United Arab Emirates 7,826,981 83.7 Singapore 2,323,252 42.9 Switzerland 2,438,702 28.9 Israel 2,046,873 26.5 New Zealand 1,132,736 25.1 Germany 12,005,690 14.9 United States 46,627,102 14.3 Sweden 1,639,771 14.3 United Kingdom 8,543,120 11.3 France 7,784,418 11.1 Greece 1,242,514 11.1 Italy 5,788,875 8.0 Russia 11,643,276 7.7 Turkey 4,580,678 5.81 Japan 2,437,169 1.9 India 5,338,486 0.4 Egypt 297,448 0.4 China 848,511 0.1 Indonesia 295,433 0.1 Vietnam 68,290 0.1 Global Connectedness – Visiting foreign countries Connecting face-to-face THE BENEFIT: advanced cultural diversity, learning, teaching, blending, interaction and understanding 13
  14. 14. World 0.0 Business interaction & trade in one city Source: Concept based on WORLD 3.0 Global prosperity and how to achieve it, Harvard Business Review Press, Copyright, 2011 Imagine a city or village completely independent from the outside world. It grows its own food, makes its own clothes, handles all medical problems, etc. That was the world thousands of years ago. 14
  15. 15. Business interaction and trade from village to area to whole state The village starts to connect with other villages, trade with each other and help each other when need be. They make agreements on how to work together. Then, that connection and trade continues to grow. 15
  16. 16. Business interaction & trade within a state to the whole nation The villages in the state continue to expand their connections. Eventually, connections expand into a nation. More opportunities, better life, more products/services available 16
  17. 17. National business interaction & trade World 1.0 We now enter the world of “World 1.0” in which a country tries to trade as much as possible within its boundries, but tries to restrict outside influence. It tries to protect the connections it has established. 17 USA
  18. 18. Regional business interaction & trade As time passes, a country learns that it is influenced by its neighbors. Therefore, more connection, interaction and trade expands again. Additional opportunities, products and services available 18
  19. 19. World 0.0 Business interaction & trade in one city Source: Concept based on WORLD 3.0 Global prosperity and how to achieve it, Harvard Business Review Press, Copyright, 2011 That was the total world thousands of years ago. Imagine a city or village completely independent from the outside world. It grows its own food, makes its own clothes, handles all medical problems, etc. 山形 19
  20. 20. World 1.0 Business interaction & trade in one city The village starts to connect with other villages, trade with each other and help each other when need be. They make agreements on how to work together. Then, that connection and trade continues to grow. 20
  21. 21. National business interaction & trade World 1.0 We now enter the world of “World 1.0” in which a country tries to trade as much as possible within its boundries, but tries to restrict outside influence. It tries to protect the connections it has established. Stop! 21
  22. 22. TPP business interaction & trade (TPP-Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade) There are 11 countries in talks now. Japan and Thailand are considering attending. These talks could help expand global interaction and trade within the Pacific region. It is highly recommended that Japan attends the talks. Through the talks, the value of global trade and the potential concerns could be evaluated. USA Canada Mexico Peru Chile Vietnam Malaysia Singapore Brunei Australia New Zealand Thailand Japan TPP Trans-Pacific Partnership Much more opportunities, improved life, even more products/services available 22
  23. 23. Global business interaction & trade World 2.0 With the internet and inexpensive global communications some believe we are in “World 2.0” in which there is only one market, the global market. They believe all markets are equal and should have free access. 23
  24. 24. What is World 3.0? World 3.0 It is not World 0.0, World 1.0 or World 2.0. It is World 3.0. Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT 24
  25. 25. World 3.0 – Looking at connection differently World 3.0 Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT What only affects a local region? What affects the globe? What are the differences? What is the distance? In World 3.0 both distance and differences still matter greatly. Those differences must be explored in each case to determine the ideal level of connectedness. Some issues should be kept at the local level, other issues at the global level. MuchLittle 25
  26. 26. CAGE - Differences Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT G-Geographic – How great are the geographic differences? E-Economic – How great are the economic differences? A-Administrative – How great are the administrative differences? C-Culture – How great are the cultural differences? MuchLittle 26
  27. 27. C- Cultural Differences Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT Social/ethnic networks – How great are social networks? Language – How great are language/communication differences? Religion – How great are religious differences? Values – How different are norms, values and work ethics? MuchLittle 27
  28. 28. A- Administrative Differences Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT Trade Bloc – Are the countries in a shared regional trading bloc? Colonial Ties – Do the countries have a colonial history? Currency/measurements – Is there a common currency/measurements? Political – Are there good/poor political relations? Legal System – Are the laws/regulations similar? MuchLittle 28
  29. 29. G- Geographic Distance Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT Common Border – Is there a common border between the countries? Physical Distance – Are the countries/cities close to each other? Climate – Are there similar climates between the countries? Remoteness – Is the country far away from other countries? Port – Is the country landlocked or is there an available port? MuchLittle 29
  30. 30. E- Economic Distance Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT Natural resources – Are there concerns over in raw materials? Income – Is there a great consumer income difference? Financial – Are there major financial differences? Organizational – Are quality local companies available? Supply chain – Are there developed supply chains in each country? MuchLittle Human resources – Is there a difference in knowhow, skills? 30
  31. 31. Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2004 These factors and ranking are to determine New Zealand’s bilateral trade barrier liberalization and promotion campaigns by close economic partners (CEP) which will produce the greatest economic and technical development. Factors New Zealand uses for promoting country connectedness 31 Highest inward/outward FDI by country Highest inward/outward R & D by country Highest inward/outward goods traded by country Highest inward/outward tourism by country Highest inward/outward education exports by country Highest inward/outward immigration/emigration by country
  32. 32. New Zealand’s Conclusion Countries to deepen R & D contact Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2004 Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness Global R & D technological leaders Countries geographically close Countries that have extensive trade with now Countries have extensive FDI with now Countries have co-investment potential Countries receptive to collaboration Countries with common language Countries with shared technological specialty Targets: #1-USA, Japan, UK, Germany & Australia, Future targets: Korea, Taiwan and China 32
  33. 33. New Zealand’s Conclusion Countries to deepen FDI with Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2004 Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness Have high FDI now Have technology that could be learned Have technology that could be applied Have knowhow that would stimulate local companies Could develop knowhow that is needed Have technology that could develop local natural resources Have technology that is not available now Countries with MNC with management expertise 33
  34. 34. New Zealand’s Conclusion Non-economic promotion to select countries Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2004 Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness Tourism programs Educational programs Expatriate associations Overseas market information sharing 34
  35. 35. New Zealand’s Conclusion Immigration-Concerns Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2004 Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness Most ideas are replicated or modified from previous employment. Can those ideas be imported through immigration? Ideas are spread through the mobility of key engineers. Could they be looked for? Could more direct contacts with foreign engineers and other researchers in conferences be encouraged/promoted? Could import-competing companies be acquired for technology, R&D collaboration, patents and licenses? Could consultation with experts, communications with suppliers, mergers and joint ventures/alliances be promoted? Could R&D out-sourcing and personnel exchanges be promoted to bring wealth to New Zealand? Could researcher at universities be encouraged? 35
  36. 36. New Zealand’s Conclusion Immigration-Concerns Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2004 Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness As Pacific-Rim countries are targeted for FDI, trade, services and R&D, those countries also should be targeted for greater people exchange. The UK also should be targeted so as to lever off existing strong relationships in all dimensions. For the future immigration from India and Pakistan could be promoted with its growing and well-educated middle class and its fluency in English. 36
  37. 37. New Zealand’s Conclusion Immigration - Emigration Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness New Zealander living outside the country 12% of total population Foreign population in New Zealand 22% of total population Source: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2011 (World ranking among 125 countries (98% of world GDP and 92% of population) 37
  38. 38. Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2004 Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness New Zealand’s Overall Conclusion 38
  39. 39. New Zealand’s Conclusion Countries to deepen Trade Source: Global Connectedness and Bilateral Economic Linkages Which Countries? NEW ZEALAND TREASURY, Working Paper, June, 2004 Example: New Zealand’s Bilateral Global Connectedness Pacific Rim South Korea ASEAN countries Mexico China Chile 39
  40. 40. What global connectedness offers (ADDING) Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT A – Adding production volume/economies of scale D – Decreasing costs/economies of scale D – Differentiating, offering different products and solutions I – Intensifies competition, forces companies to improve N - Normalize risks. Success in one market balances failures in others G – Generates, spreads and diffuses knowledge 40
  41. 41. Global connectedness and pollution Pollution Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT Most ecological problems reside within countries and not between countries. That is not to say pollution issues should be ignored globally. Some issues like global warming must be addressed at the global level. River pollution could be handled within a countries or possibly between two bordering countries. Global expansion could both caused and reduced pollution. Environmental influence must be considered in any global activity. 41
  42. 42. Global connectedness and foreign funding Financial Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT Foreign direct investment (FDI) has shown to be very good for the global economy. Investment in equities by foreign investors has also shown to be good for the global economy. Foreign debt has been more problematic when it comes to overall global financial health. 42
  43. 43. Global connectedness and food supply/price risks World food Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT Globalization has not caused unstable food prices. Only 18% of wheat, 7% of rice and 10% of all coarse grains (including corn) were traded across boarders in 2008 (The total production of these three items is 60% of world caloric intake). Food exports to overall merchandise trade is around 8.5% ~ 12.2%. This has helped stabilized supply and prices. 43
  44. 44. Global connectedness and unemployment Source: World 3.0 GLOBAL PROSPERITY AND HOW TO ACHIEVE IT Globalization has not caused total unemployment. Labor is not a simple commodity. People have different skills, experiences, preferences, capabilities and learning potential. The cause of unemployment is very complicated. It is influenced by shifts from production to services, changing union strengths, labor- saving technology and tax changes. Most economists think technology is the greatest cause of unemployment. Global trade has far less influence. It is not written in news papers, but strong labor protection has curtailed job losses, but stifled job creation. Jobs 44
  45. 45. Global connectedness and military conflict Globalization offers diversification and choices. These choices promote understanding and respect across borders. Even when trade conflict occurs, it is far better than military conflict. Quite often the lack of mutual trading is the reasons why wars start. It is particularly true when countries hold monopolies on valuable raw materials. There is a direct link between trade (and its occasional conflict) and war. War Region 45
  46. 46. Healthy competition Where there is learning, product development, personnel development, long-term strategy development and low stress working environments Fierce fighting Where there is discounting, damaging competitor moves, high stress, and an overall unattractive image No competition Where there is complacence, no stress, and no development activities Global connectedness & extremes of competition Globalization and openness will create competition. It must be done so there is neither complacency or fierce fighting. Fierce fighting could be the result of the differences mentioned earlier. 46
  47. 47. Global Connectedness Resistance Source: Concept based on WORLD 3.0 Global prosperity and how to achieve it, Harvard Business Review Press, Copyright, 2011 A great deal of the wealthiest people in developing countries are people who inherited their wealth. They tend to be protectionists along with anyone in a non-competitive, declining industry. A great deal of the wealthiest people in industrialized countries are self-made millionaires (entrepreneurs) who welcome competition. Inherited wealth protectionist Interacting entrepreneur 47
  48. 48. Global Connectedness stimulates local growth Connecting factors Merchandise/service trade (35%) Cross-boarder capital movement (35%) Cross-boarder information flow (15%) People cross-boarder movement (15%) Source of percentages: DHL Global Connectedness Index, 2012 48 Higher GDP in each country and globally Increased local prosperity More local choices. lower costs higher quality available Stage #1: Many have doubts Stage #2: Achievement surprise Stage #3: Feel life improvement
  49. 49. Thank You Global Connectedness The more we connect, the better we communicate. The more we communicate, the greater we trust. The greater we trust, the more we invest. The more we invest, the greater the opportunities for entrepreneurs. The greater the number of entrepreneurs, the great the chance all will prosper. 49

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