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Scientific and technical translation in English - week 3 2019

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Intro to MT

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Scientific and technical translation in English - week 3 2019

  1. 1. Scientific and Technical Translation in English: Week 3 Dr. Ron Martinez
  2. 2. General course outline • Week 1: Introduction to the course; Important concepts in translation • Week 2: Research article structure, common discourse problems • Week 3: Hands-on introduction to electronic tools; glossaries • Week 4: CAT tools; First IMRaD Team translation • Week 5: Review of team translations • Week 6: Introduction to midterm • Week 7: Midterm assessment (in-class) • Week 8: Midterm review; New teams, new “live” assignments • Week 9: Assignments continued • Week 10: Assignments continued • Week 11: Completion of final translations • Week 12: Group presentations • Week 13: Group presentations • Week 14: Group presentations • Week 15: Certificates and meet-the-author
  3. 3. Aims for today • Look critically at some key points of grammar; • Explore “resourcefulness” in the contexto of electronic tools; • Introduce the concept of Machine Translation and the role of the translator in MT STT.
  4. 4. Main reasons articles get rejected Belcher (2007) Bordage (2001) Sullivan (2002) McKercher et al. (2007) Wrong journal X ✓ ✓ ✓ Faulty method ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Lack of transparency X ✓ ✓ ✓ Problems with statistics X ✓ ✓ ✓ Poor discussion, overstating importance of findings ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Improper formatting X ✓ X ✓ Writing difficult to follow ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Inadequate literature review ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Nothing new ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Contribution not clear ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Poor English X X X X
  5. 5. Homework 2 • Are you confident enough to suggest changes to an article? Read the introduction to the unpublished “Corpus Linguistics” article (online). Any problems? Make notes on what you would tell the author; bring the suggestions to class. • Read the Doherty article on translation technologies (online). According to the author, what opportunities and advantages do new technologies present? Any potential disadvantages?
  6. 6. Where should the translator start?
  7. 7. Cohesion! TITLE ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION Prof. Dr. Ron Martinez ronmartinez@ufpr.br
  8. 8. But what does all this have to do with translation? • Cohesion • Coherence • Identify the root of misunderstandings • Alert author(s) and recommend changes • We are not translating for sake of translation – but as “literacy brokers” (people who have a role in the path to publication)
  9. 9. An example: (though clearly not enough...)
  10. 10. Homework 1 1. Download “Article Requiring Revision”. 2. Try to identify CARS in the introduction (Section 1). 3. Look at the comments from the Journal Editor (also online). Specifically, focus on the comments from “Reviewer 2”. Do you agree? 4. Look at lines 56-72: Can you identify any of the problems discussed in Belcher (2007), McKercher et al. (2007), etc.? 5. Look at lines 134 and 139: Which words were translated “wrong” (i.e. potentially lead to misunderstanding)? 6. Discuss with a partner.
  11. 11. Brazilian research articles: “The resulting effect, an introduction without a clear gap statement, might have difficulty getting accepted in a journal like English for Specific Purposes, considering the results of the present study.” (Hirano, 2009, p. 246).
  12. 12. Notice the grammar 1. Look at the Hirano (2009) Introduction again. 2. In the first sentence of each new paragraph, which has Hirano chosen to use: present simple, past simple, or present perfect? 3. Discuss: Why are such grammar choices important? What relevance might they have in translation?
  13. 13. Move 1 (“Territory”)
  14. 14. Move 1  Move 2 (“Niche”)
  15. 15. Move 2  Move 3 (“Occupy the niche”)
  16. 16. Move 2  Move 3 (“Occupy the niche”)
  17. 17. Work in pairs
  18. 18. Hirano (2009) “It is arguable that these authors transferred the rhetorical organization they would use in Portuguese to their articles in English. The resulting effect, an introduction without a clear gap statement, might have difficulty getting accepted in a journal like English for Specific Purposes, considering the results of the present study.” (Hirano, 2009, p. 246).
  19. 19. “Epistemological shift” (17th century) • Scientific observation of the world must be dispassionate; • Logos > Pathos: “Think things, not words” (Francis Bacon); • English academic rhetoric became more “thing”-based (noun-based).
  20. 20. Translate: 1. “Foram analisados cuidadosamente tanto dados qualitativos quanto quantitativos.” 2. “Foram usados, para esta tarefa, os softwares SPSS e MaxQDA, respectivamente.”
  21. 21. Portuguese “verbal fronting”
  22. 22. Move 2  Move 3 (“Occupy the niche”)
  23. 23. You try! 1. Do the translation. 2. Keep track of all the steps you take and tools you use. 3. When finished, compare with a partner. Also compare steps taken.
  24. 24. Is Google Translate(and Bing, etc.) a good thing?
  25. 25. Exercise: “Can you tell the difference?” 1. Go to the exercise on our class webpage (“Which one did Google do?”). 2. When finished, discuss with a classmate.
  26. 26. Doherty (2016)
  27. 27. Doherty (2016)
  28. 28. So what is the role of the translator?
  29. 29. So what is the role of the translator? “Source” text  “Start” text
  30. 30. So what is the role of the translator?
  31. 31. So what is the role of the translator?
  32. 32. HOMEWORK FOR NEXT WEEK 1. Download the Site Translation text (online). 2. If you are assigned number “1”: translate the text manually (no MT). TIME YOURSELF. Note the time, bring printed version of translation to next class. 3. If you are assigned number “2”: Use MT (e.g. Google Translate) and post-edit the text. TIME YOURSELF. Note the time, bring printed version of translation to next class.

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