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OPRF Live and Give Report

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Here’s a copy of the project we did for the OPRF Infant Welfare Society. Through our research, we discovered what motivates the community to donate, join, participate and engage with non-profit organizations, specifically seeking to understand why people give both locally and outside their community.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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OPRF Live and Give Report

  1. 1. 1 The Live & Give Project 5.15.15 A Study of Charitable Giving in Oak Park & River Forest
  2. 2. 2 1.  To gain insight into the awareness, interest and perceptions of various community organizations in the Oak Park River Forest area. 2.  To understand what motivates the community to donate, join, participate and engage with non-profit organizations, specifically seeking to understand why people choose to give to organizations outside of the community as well as giving locally. Purpose of the Research
  3. 3. 3 Who We Surveyed
  4. 4. 4 •  Conducted a 15-20 minute online survey -  Fielded February/March, 2015 •  687 community members provided key data points to analyze -  Based on demographic information they provided a statistically significant sample Methodology and Sample
  5. 5. 5 •  52,000 live in Oak Park (22,670 HH) •  68% are White •  54% Female •  Median HH Income $78,800 •  Median age 39 years http://www.census.gov/ Oak Park River Forest Population •  11,210 live in River Forest (3,961 HH) •  85% are White •  53% Female •  Median HH Income $113,300 •  Median age 41 years Residents of Oak Park (N=539, 78%) Residents of River Forest (N=148, 22%)
  6. 6. 6 We weighted on demographics to ensure our sample reflected the actual population 54% 46%Gender 40% 20% 11% 16% 13%Age 68% 14% 18%Ethnicity 47% 12% 16% 26%Income Female Male 20-39 40-49 50-54 55-64 65+ white black other Less than $75,000 $75,000-$99,999 $100,000-$149,999 $150,000+
  7. 7. 7 Key Takeaways
  8. 8. 8 Community takeaways •  Oak Park River Forest is a very giving community, 100% of our sample gave in some way •  Residents say they would like to donate even more, if they had more time/money •  Residents want to know more about organizations, particularly their needs and impact •  Sometimes all it takes is to ask •  Residents give more time locally than non-locally •  Residents give more money locally to kids-oriented organizations •  Residents believe that other communities need more help than their own •  Many don’t realize that local organizations also help those outside of the community •  Residents want to see proof that organizations are efficient and well-run
  9. 9. 9 Our Community Gives
  10. 10. 10 Oak Park River Forest is a very giving community 100% of the sample donated one way or another… 91% 85% donated money donated time
  11. 11. 11 National Philanthropic Trust, 2013 The mean donation is $5,986 in Oak Park River Forest compared to the national average of $2,974 2xUS average Residents give an average of 4.3% of their income compared to the Chicago average of 3.1% 1.4xChicago Giving in Chicago 2013
  12. 12. 12 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% $1,000 or More $500 or More $100 or More $25 or More US Chicago OPRF Oak Park and River Forest residents give more at every donation level Giving in Chicago 2013
  13. 13. 13 49% 25%85% OPRF residents Chicagoans Americans Giving in Chicago 2013 When it comes to time, Oak Park and River Forest residents are much more giving Gave Time Didn’t Give Time
  14. 14. 14 Most of those who volunteer said they give time in more than one of 4 options provided •  Only 13% gave time in just one of the four ways 55% 52% 46% 26% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Raised money Provided expertise Directly provided service Committee or Board %ofThosewhoVolunteeredTime How Time is Volunteered Attended a fundraiser Residents typically volunteer their time in more ways than one Time Local only
  15. 15. 15 People of lowest income bracket are slightly less likely to be on a committee or board than the highest income bracket 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Less than $75,000 $75,000 to $99,999 $100,000 to $149,999 $150,000 or more Provided expertise Committee or Board Directly provided service Raise money / Attended Fundraiser
  16. 16. 16 Everyone Gives Regardless of Geography, Income, or Age
  17. 17. 17 Regardless of zip code, most everyone donates money Giving is commonplace in every neighborhood Proportion who donate money by zip code RIVER FOREST 91% give OAK PARK 90% give 94% give
  18. 18. 18 Regardless of zip code, most everyone donates money Giving is commonplace in every neighborhood Proportion who donate money by zip code Median: $2,000 Mean: $7,618 Median: $800 Mean: $2,274 Median: $1,000 Mean: $6,885
  19. 19. 19 Residents of all income levels give Lower income levels tend to give a larger proportion of their income 6.4% 4.8% 4.3% 3.7% 0.0% 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 6.0% 7.0% Less than $75,000 $75,000 to $99,999 $100,000 to $149,999 $150,000 or more % of Income Donated Income level and total donation 4.3% Average
  20. 20. 20 Donation size increases with age 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 20-39 40-49 50-54 55-64 65+ Penetration of Money and Time by Age % Who Donated Money % Who Volunteered Time Volunteering time peaks in the 40s and early 50s All age groups are giving, but donation amounts increase with age $500 $2,000 $1,300 $2,000 $3,500 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% 8% $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $3,500 $4,000 20-39 40-49 50-54 55-64 65+ Median Annual Total Donations and Percent of Income Donated by Age Total donation Percent of Income
  21. 21. 21 How Much Stays in Our Community?
  22. 22. 22 84% Gave Money Locally $500 Median Donation 82% Gave Money Non- Locally $500 Median Donation Oak Park River Forest donates outside and within the community with a fairly even split
  23. 23. 23 In OPRF, the same amount stays in the community as is donated outside the community Giving in Chicago 2013 A lower share of dollars stayed local in Oak Park River Forest compared to Chicago 49% Oak Park River Forest 78% Chicago Percent Dollars that Stay in the community Percent Dollars that leave the community
  24. 24. 24 Only Time 6% Only Time 7% Both 48% Only Money 35% Only Money 17% Both 68% 82% Money 55% Time 84% Money 73% Time While money is split evenly, time is volunteered more locally Local Giving Non-Local Giving Less than 10% give only time without giving some money
  25. 25. 25 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 20-39 40-49 50-54 55-64 65+ % Who Donate by Age Residents of all ages give locally and non-locally Donated Money Locally Donated Money Non-Locally
  26. 26. 26 $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 20-39 40-49 50-54 55-64 65+ Median Annual Contributions by Age At around age 55, people start giving a much larger share locally Local Donation Non-Local Donations Even though fewer people ages 50-54 are donating – those who do are giving more than younger cohorts.
  27. 27. 27 Where We Choose to Give
  28. 28. 28 ANIMAL WELFARE, such as animal rights, wildlife conservations BASIC NEEDS, such as reducing hunger, homelessness, and unemployment HEALTH, MEDICAL, & SCIENCE, such as hospitals, mental health organizations, nursing homes, hospices, clinics, societies, and medical research HUMAN SERVICES, such as daycare, foster care, elderly care, family counseling, and consumer protection FOUNDATIONS, which include organizations that have the abilities to provide support to different types of nonprofit organizations YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, after-school programs, mentoring, and self-enhancement
  29. 29. 29 EDUCATION, such as elementary schools, secondary or higher education, and libraries RELIGION, such as churches, synagogues, convents, seminaries, and mosques DISASTER & RELIEF, such as development and relief services, and international peace PUBLIC OR SOCIETAL BENEFIT, such as civil rights, minority and women’s equity issues, and social action ENVIRONMENT, such as environmental protection and conservation ARTS, CULTURE, & HUMANITIES, such as performing arts, museums, public radio, and cultural groups
  30. 30. 30 Compared to Chicago and the U.S., Oak Park and River Forest prioritizes monetary donations towards Education Local and non-local donations Money OPRF Chicago US Giving in Chicago 2013 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Health, Medical & Science Religion Basic Needs Education % Who give $ to causes
  31. 31. 31 Across all categories, residents give more money than time Local and non-local donations Money Time 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Animal Welfare Foundations Human Services Health, Medical & Science Youth Development Education Religion Basic Needs % of People Who Donate $ and Time Education, Basic Needs, and Religion have the highest penetration of financial donors Education has the most volunteers
  32. 32. 32 Basic Needs, Religion and Education have the highest penetration of financial donors Local and non-local donations Money Time 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Animal Welfare Foundations Human Services Health, Medical & Science Youth Development Education Religion Basic Needs % of People Who Donate $ and Time
  33. 33. 33 Education has the most volunteers Local and non-local donations Money Time 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Animal Welfare Foundations Health, Medical & Science Human Services Youth Development Basic Needs Religion Education % of People Who Donate $ and Time
  34. 34. 34 20 to 39 years 40 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 64 years 65 and over Basic Needs (64%) Education (94%) Education (86%) Basic Needs (81%) Religion (80%) Education (57%) E (86%) Basic Needs (75%) Education (75%) Basic Needs (76%) Health (50%) Basic Needs (78%) Development (68%) Religion (70%) Education (66%) Education isn’t #1 for everyone – age drives shifting priorities •  Basic Needs is a top priority throughout lifespan •  Education peaks in middle age alongside Youth Development •  Religion increases in priority for those 55 and over % who give money or time, local or non-local #1 #2 #3 BASIC NEEDS EDUCATION YOUTH DEVELOPMENT RELIGION RELIGIONEDUCATION EDUCATION EDUCATION EDUCATION BASIC NEEDS BASIC NEEDS BASIC NEEDS BASIC NEEDS HEALTH, MED, & SCIENCE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
  35. 35. 35 Where We Choose to Give Local vs. Non-local
  36. 36. 36 Locally, Religion and Education receive the most donations Money Both Time Local donations N= 652 6% 12% 18% 21% 23% 25% 19% 18% 4% 3% 6% 8% 15% 17% 25% 33% 3% 1% 2% 1% 11% 9% 9% 4% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Foundations Animal Welfare Health, Medical, & Science Human Services Youth Development Basic Needs Education Religion Percent of residents who give locally
  37. 37. 37 Money Both Time 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Religion Percent of residents who give locally Gave both Money and Time Gave only TimeGave only Money Chart Guide Local donations N= 652
  38. 38. 38 59% 43% 23% 64% 58% 72% 49% 41% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Youth Development Human Services Animal Welfare Education Religion Basic Needs Health, Medical, & Science Foundations Local and non-local giving % who gave non-locally only % who gave locally and non-locally % who gave locally only % who gave to cause (money or time, local or non-local) Comparing local to non-local giving, organizations that benefit children and animals attract more local giving While giving to Health and Foundations, much more goes outside of the community Local and non-local donations Money and Time
  39. 39. 39 How Much We Give Locally
  40. 40. 40 The number of people who give is not always in line with how much they give $325 $813 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% $0 $100 $200 $300 $400 $500 $600 $700 $800 $900 $1,000 Foundations Animal Welfare Health, Medical, & Science Average Human Services Youth Development Basic Needs Education Religion Median Donation Penetration Local donations Money While fewer are giving to Health, those that do give larger amounts While many people are giving to Education, Basic Needs, Youth Development and Human Services, the amounts tends to be smaller
  41. 41. 41 Breakouts of monetary amounts differ across causes as well A quarter of yearly donations to Religion were $2,500 or more, Next in line were Health, Human Services, and Foundations 50% 66% 38% 38% 54% 37% 31% 21% 50% 33% 61% 59% 41% 58% 58% 55% 0% 1% 1% 3% 5% 5% 10% 24% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Youth Development Animal Welfare Education Basic Needs Foundations Human Services Health, Medical, & Science Religion Donation Sizes less than $100 $100-$2,499 $2,500+ Less than $100 $100-$2,499 $2,500+ Local donations Time and Money
  42. 42. 42 Breakouts of monetary amounts differ across causes as well A quarter of yearly donations to Religion were $2,500 or more, Next in line were Health, Human Services, and Foundations 50% 66% 38% 38% 54% 37% 31% 21% 50% 33% 61% 59% 41% 58% 58% 55% 0% 1% 1% 3% 5% 5% 10% 24% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Youth Development Animal Welfare Education Basic Needs Foundations Human Services Health, Medical, & Science Religion Donation Sizes less than $100 $100-$2,499 $2,500+ Less than $100 $100-$2,499 $2,500+ Local donations Time and Money Over 50% of donations to Foundations and Animal Welfare are under $100
  43. 43. 43 Why We Give Locally vs. Non-Locally
  44. 44. 44 “I give to both local and national, sometimes international. In most situations, I feel happier about giving local.” -OPRF resident
  45. 45. 45 Residents’ attitudes reflect their giving nature And they do not prefer big, national organizations over local ones Half or more strongly agree with the following statements Half or more strongly disagree with the following statements Strongly agree is top 3 box (8-10 on 10pt scale) Strongly disagree is bottom 3 box (1-3 on 10pt scale) “I care very passionately about certain charitable causes.” “I feel it is just as important to volunteer my time to worthy causes as it is to donate money.” “I would like to be able to donate more money to charities and organizations, but I cannot afford to do so.” “People should take responsibility of their own lives and economic well-being, and not expect other people to help.” “I prefer to support large, nationally-run organizations over locally-run community organizations.” “Bigger, well-known charities tend to be run better and more efficiently than smaller, local charities.”
  46. 46. 46 Those who donate money locally are more passionate about causes 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% I care passionately about causes I feel my time is as important as money I cant afford to donate I decide where to donate based on cause not location I would rather donate to small charities I make a point of remembering to support local I tell my friends and family about orgs to support I am involved in supporting local nonprofit orgs Charities should focus on home rather than abroad Im concerned about effective use of donation I dont have time to donate Attitudes about Giving (% Top 3 Box) Gave Locally Didn’t give Locally Money Only
  47. 47. 47 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Local orgs have plenty of resources Easier to volunteer near work Not interested in local orgs Regional or national make bigger impact Friends or family not involved Regional or national better reflect my interests Outside communities need it more Local taxes are too high No one has asked Involved in another community (used to live) Percent Agreement When they do give non-locally, 4 reasons rise to the top: ties to where they used to live, no one has asked, taxes are too high and other communities need it more Top 3 box
  48. 48. 48 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Local orgs have plenty of resources Easier to volunteer near work Not interested in local orgs Regional or national make bigger impact Friends or family not involved Regional or national better reflect my interests Outside communities need it more Local taxes are too high No one has asked Involved in another community (used to live) Percent Agreement Among those who donate more non-locally than they do locally, belief in greater need outside the community is the top barrier – followed by no one asking Everyone Those who donate more non-locally Top 3 box
  49. 49. 49 Why We Give
  50. 50. 50 Motivations to Giving We asked people why they choose to give to organizations, across a series of 25 statements. If a respondent gave both locally and non-locally, we randomly chose one local organization and one non-local cause to ask about.
  51. 51. 51 Their answers revealed 7 primary motivations to giving. I donate to or am involved with this organization/cause because… Miscellaneous Item: It allowed me to carry on tradition I could Participate & Interact I could put my talents to use I had the opportunity to participate in a variety of ways I got the opportunity to meet people I could interact directly with those who needed help I could see the results of my involvement firsthand It allowed me to be a role model for others It broadened my experiences and perspective on life I could Be Social I got to go to fun events They made it enjoyable to give my time or money I got to spend time with friends and family that also participated It allowed me to Feel Good About Self It made me feel good about myself It made me feel less selfish I was in the spirit of giving I felt as if I was repaying others for all they had done for me or those I love There was a Personal Benefit to Me It gave me stature in the community It provided me with the opportunity to network Escape my own issues   I was Asked I was asked to give or participate by the organization I was asked to give or participate by someone I know I could Connect to Something Bigger It made me feel like I’m part of a community It connected me to an organization that is well-known and well-regarded I could Make an Impact It fulfilled my desire to make a positive impact on society It connected me to a cause that’s near and dear to my heart It allowed me to provide relief in times of need
  52. 52. 52 That align themselves around 2 dimensions Externally Motivated Internally Motivated We factor analyzed the 25 individual motive statements and uncovered 7 motivational factors that align themselves around two key dimensions. Actively participate or (ENGAGE) vs. alleviate a negative or (PROVIDE RELIEF) Motivated by INTERNAL needs or desires vs. EXTERNAL ones (motivated for or by others) Engage Provide Relief
  53. 53. 53 Motives for Giving Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage There was a Personal Benefit to Me I could Participate & Interact It allowed me to Feel Good About Myself I could Connect to Something Bigger I could Make an Impact I Was Asked I could Be Social Provide Relief
  54. 54. 54 Looking through the lens of Motives for Giving also reveals key insights to local vs. non-local giving as well as time vs. money Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage There was a Personal Benefit to Me I could Participate & Interact It allowed me to Feel Good About Myself I could Connect to Something Bigger I could Make an Impact I Was Asked I could Be Social Provide Relief Generally speaking, the motives in the upper hemisphere drive time while those in the lower drive money But there are exceptions when it comes to local vs. non-local
  55. 55. 55 Allowing people to put their talents to use is a large motivator for giving time locally and non-locally Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage TIME I could Participate & Interact Local Local Non Non $ Time $ Time I could put my talents to use 5% 56% 20% 57% I could see the results of my involvement firsthand 18% 43% 12% 37% It broadened my experiences and perspective on life 14% 26% 18% 51% I got the opportunity to meet people 6% 33% 19% 24% I could interact directly with those who needed help 8% 23% 18% 29% It allowed me to be a role model for others 6% 17% 16% 23% I had the opportunity to participate in a variety of ways 10% 17% 16% 21% Provide Relief I could Participate & Interact
  56. 56. 56 The social aspect also drives time, but at a local level Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage I could Be Social Local Local Non Non $ Time $ Time I got to go to fun events 15% 26% 8% 18% They made it enjoyable to give my time or money 17% 42% 31% 32% I got to spend time with friends and family that also participated 14% 32% 16% 19% LOCAL TIME Provide Relief I could Be Social
  57. 57. 57 Being asked by the organization drives giving money (local and non-local), whereas being asked by a friend drives time locally, money non-local Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage I was Asked Local Local Non Non $ Time $ Time I was asked to give or participate by the organization 31% 24% 29% 21% I was asked to give or participate by someone I know 29% 35% 28% 19%Provide Relief I Was Asked
  58. 58. 58 Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage I could Connect to Something Bigger Local Local Non Non $ Time $ Time It made me feel like I’m part of a community 23% 33% 34% 37% It connected me to an organization that is well-known and well-regarded 26% 23% 25% 25% Feeling connected to something bigger motivates giving both time and money, local and non-local Provide Relief I could Connect to Something Bigger
  59. 59. 59 Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage I could Make an Impact NON-LOCAL $LOCAL TIME I could Make an Impact Local Local Non Non $ Time $ Time It fulfilled my desire to make a positive impact on society 35% 58% 55% 56% It connected me to a cause that’s near and dear to my heart 32% 49% 50% 31% It allowed me to provide relief in times of need 16% 22% 35% 22% Feeling connected to a cause drives volunteering time locally, but donating money non-locally Provide Relief
  60. 60. 60 Giving money to non-local organizations is a way people feel good about themselves Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage NON-LOCAL $ It allowed me to Feel Good About Myself Local Local Non Non $ Time $ Time I was in the spirit of giving 25% 25% 44% 27% It made me feel good about myself 19% 22% 33% 16% I felt as if I was repaying others for all they had done for me or those I love 15% 10% 22% 16% It made me feel less selfish 9% 12% 17% 9% Provide Relief It allowed me to Feel Good About Myself
  61. 61. 61 Having the opportunity to network is a driver for volunteering time Few admit having stature in the community motivates them Externally Motivated Internally Motivated Engage There was a Personal Benefit to Me TIME Provide Relief There was a Personal Benefit to Me Local Local Non Non $ Time $ Time It gave me stature in the community 1% 3% 2% 8% It provided me with the opportunity to network 8% 19% 9% 23% Escape my own issues 1% 9% 1% 7%
  62. 62. 62 What Would Get Us to Give More (in our words)
  63. 63. 63 As a local resident, I would give more if… 1.  If I was asked “Simple, clearly written appeals” 2.  If an organization’s principles aligned with my own “I'm a big animal welfare advocate…” 3.  If I knew what impact my donation would make “The magnitude of the impact that my donation of time, talent and/or treasure can make. I want to make an impact and I want to see the needle moved.” 4.  If I knew the needs of the organization “Specific tasks that need to be done” Qualitative, free response, ranked by most popular 5.  If I was confident the organization was well- managed and efficiently used their resources “Transparency of how money is used” 6.  If I was able to get involved with friends and family “Family friendly opportunities to do with children” 7.  If local organizations were more consolidated or coordinated “I'd like to see more coordinated efforts between local organizations to reduce inefficiency and create more cohesive support services coverage.”
  64. 64. 64 “Simple, clearly written appeals” “A catalogue of local charitable options might be nice.” “Profile stories in the community news about successes, challenges, needs” “Perhaps [organizations in] Oak Park and River Forest should develop a potential list of donors to contact.” “I follow many local orgs on Facebook, but few (if any) ever post about volunteer opportunities.” “This organization does it well. They have a compelling story and metrics for everything. We need to hear more stories of need and of impact.” 1
  65. 65. 65 “I'm a big animal welfare advocate…” “Finding something of personal interest to me” or “that I am passionate about” “Organizations that provide direct service to children...” “…that work for my political or philosophical beliefs” “…that are working to connect climate justice with their services, programs, education.” 2
  66. 66. 66 “The magnitude of the impact that my donation of time, talent and/or treasure can make. I want to make an impact and I want to see the needle moved.” “If I knew where the money went,” saw “visible stories of impact,” or heard “testimonials - not only numbers.” “Seeing an impact. This is why I volunteer more locally but give more money to organizations that are further… I see a direct impact coming from my time investment, and that is more meaningful to me.” “If they actually helped to make changes in policy and implementation that resulted in social and environmental benefits to people and the planet instead of marketing themselves and just holding ‘fundraisers.’” “Quantify how the money serves the community. Some organizations communicate their client services very well. Some of the others don't explain what $100 will provide.” 3
  67. 67. 67 “Specific tasks that need to be done” “Although my time is limited, I might be willing to volunteer if I new what kind of help was needed by various organizations.” “Having more information about their needs” “Awareness of specific opportunities or expertise that might be needed for local organizations to see if it matched my areas of interest or expertise.” • “I am an IT architect and would be willing to donate IT services (time), but it's not easy to find an organization with those needs.” • “More organizations utilizing the skills I have (professional counseling) instead of asking for money or using me to solicit money in the community.” 4
  68. 68. 68 “Transparency of how money is used” “External validation of organizational impact” “If the group has a track record/reputation of successfully assisting those most in need.” “I like to see all organizations operating efficiently. It is important that operating costs not be excessive.” 5
  69. 69. 69 “Family friendly opportunities to do with children” “I like events, where I can meet people and talk to those involved about the organization.” “I give to organizations where I have a personal connection or have friends that are personally connected.” “Personal connection as a volunteer, personal connection with the people served by the organization” “I think if I could volunteer with a friend initially, it would help motivate me.” 6
  70. 70. 70 “I'd like to see more coordinated efforts between local organizations to reduce inefficiency and create more cohesive support services coverage.” “From my perspective, OPRF agencies are so splintered that I don't think they are maximizing resources. So many agencies have similar--yet disjointed--goals and missions, there seems to be a lot of room for working together and creating a bigger impact.” “There are too many organizations at the local level and one cannot give to all. Members in community are made to feel guilty if they do not participate and help all.” 7
  71. 71. 71 Additional Information on Survey Respondents
  72. 72. 72 78% 6% 16% Device used to take Survey 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 email from OPRF community foundation, IWS, or children's clinic email from friend/neighbor email from another org picked up a flyer or postcard saw link on social media heard about different way saw the link on a website attended a fundraising event saw the link on a poster #ofRespondents How found out about survey Most took the survey on a computer and in response to emails and flyers Computer Tablet Mobile
  73. 73. 73 High School Graduate 0% Some College 5% College Graduate 26% Some Postgraduat e 10% Masters Degree 40% Doctorate, law, professional degree 19% Unweighted About half work full-time, almost all hold college degrees and a third work in Chicago Employment type Education Level 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% In OPRF outside of home Chicago At home in OPRF Other Suburb Other Where they work I do not work 22% I work part-time 24% I work full-time 54% N= 461
  74. 74. 74 No 5% Yes 95% Is OPRF Your Primary Residence? No 78% Yes 22% Have another residence outside OPRF? * *Those who have another residence spend an average of 9.8 months per year in OPRF Oak Park 78% River Forest 22% OP vs. RF Three quarters of respondents live in Oak Park, the other quarter in River Forest Roughly one quarter have another residence outside of the community Unweighted
  75. 75. 75 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Read through your mail Use social media like Facebook or Twitter Read The local newspaper Read newsletters that you receive in The mail Go to The websites of local organizations Attend local events Read Mom-mail At least weekly Monthly At least once a year Less than once a year or never Respondents read their mail, use social media, and read the local newspaper
  76. 76. 76 The Live and Give Study was brought to you by the helpful voices of Oak Park and River Forest and… In conjunction with the above, the study creation, recruitment, analysis, and presentation brought to you by Halverson Group. Located in the heart of Oak Park, The Halverson Group are experts in human behavior. They deliver innovative, actionable solutions that work in the real world and help their partners understand the marketplace. The Oak Park-River Forest Community Foundation focuses its efforts in strengthening the community through philanthropy. They are leaders in legacy grant making, endowment fund management, and training assistance to nonprofits.
  77. 77. 77 When citing findings from this research, please use the following citation: The 2015 Live and Give Project, conducted by Halverson Group and supported by The Oak Park & River Forest Community Foundation
  78. 78. 78 Thank You

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