Inviting Birds

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An overview on the most beneficial options to invite birds into your yard, based on research of birds inhabiting the upper Midwestern US.

These slides show many examples of bird feed, feeders, water features, native plants, and other ideas for inviting birds.

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Inviting Birds

  1. 1. INVITING BIRDS BIRD-SCAPING WITH A PURPOSE
  2. 2.  Bird DiversityINVITING  What might come to call, &Why?BIRDS  Bird-Scaping  Evaluation & Planning Considerations  Best Options for Results  Food, Water, and Shelter  Feed & Feeder Options  Native Seeds, Fruit, and Cover  Other Attractions  Structures  Housing  Considerations  Problems & Pests
  3. 3. DIVERSITY“VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF BIRD WATCHING” 4.BIRD SPECIES 5.HABITATS 6.SEASONS (MIGRATION)
  4. 4.  Usage Zones – Natural HabitatDIVERSITYExample of a typicalrural habitatBirds fill every niche ofevery habitatDiverse height offersdiverse food sources
  5. 5.  Usage Zones – Residential Area  Vertical DiversityDIVERSITYGreater verticaldiversity of plant lifeallows for greaterdiversity of speciesBirds fill every niche ofevery habitatDiverse height offersdiverse food sources
  6. 6.  Seasonal Diversity  Consider the timing of flowering/fruitingDIVERSITYTry to plant something  FLOWERSthat will provide benefit • Attracting insects, butterflies, andduring each season. hummingbirds  FRUITING SHRUBS • Most fruits produce mid-late summer • Some shrubs/trees hold fruit throughout winter  SEED-BEARING PLANTS • Seeds eaten by finches on the plant, or sparrows on the ground
  7. 7. MIGRATION  Hummingbird Migration TimingTIMING  Spring Bloom PeakHummingbirds move  2nd week of Maythrough SW MN quickly  Rhododendron, Flowering Crab, Lilacin spring, by departslowly leave in autumn.  Autumn Bloom PeakFind blooms that peak  Mid-augusteach season.  Trumpet vine, jewelweed, canna
  8. 8. KNOWLEDGE OF BIRDS
  9. 9. RESOURCES  moumn.org  Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union
  10. 10. MIGRATION DATES
  11. 11. RESOURCES  moumn.org  Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union
  12. 12. MIGRATION INFORMATION
  13. 13. Spring Migration Fall MigrationPOTENTIAL NESTING SPECIES Arrival Departure Arrival DepartureWood Duck 2-MarHooded Merganser 1-MarAmerican Kestrel 21-Mar 20-OctEastern Phoebe 21-Mar 31-OctPurple Martin 5-Apr 15-SepTree Swallow 20-Mar 18-OctHouse Wren 17-Apr 14-OctEastern Bluebird 1-MarNesting Species
  14. 14. FRUIT EATERS Arrival Departure Arrival DepartureRed-eyed Vireo 6-May 3-OctGray Catbird 27-Apr 12-NovBrown Thrasher 13-Apr 22-DecAmerican Robin 1-Apr 1-NovCedar Waxwing 15-Apr 15-OctWARBLERS 28-SepBaltimore Oriole 29-Apr 23-SepFruit Eating
  15. 15. SEED EATERS Arrival Departure Arrival DepartureMourning Dove 15-Apr 2-OctRed-breasted Nuthatch 23-May 18-AugSpotted Towhee 3-May 7-May 30-Sep 15-OctEastern Towhee 16-Apr 10-NovChipping Sparrow 26-Mar 10-NovClay-colored Sparrow 21-Apr 14-OctFox Sparrow 13-Mar 29-Apr 19-Sep 20-DecSong Sparrow 21-MarLincolns Sparrow 12-Apr 25-May 31-Aug 9-NovWhite-throated Sparrow 20-Mar 27-May 29-Aug 16-DecHarriss Sparrow 3-Apr 22-May 22-Sep 19-DecWhite-crowned Sparrow 21-Apr 21-May 16-Sep 13-DecNorthern Cardinal 1-Apr 15-DecRose-breasted Grosbeak 28-Apr 15-OctIndigo Bunting 4-May 9-OctHouse Finch 20-Mar 31-DecPurple Finch 17-May 27-AugAmerican Goldfinch 14-May 3-OctSeed Eating Species
  16. 16. OTHERS Arrival Departure Arrival DepartureSharp-shinned Hawk 3-Mar 10-AugCoopers Hawk 5-MarRuby-throated Hummingbird 4-May 13-OctYellow-bellied Sapsucker 28-Mar 19-OctLeast Flycatcher 1-May 26-SepNorthern Shrike 5-Apr 15-OctSwainsons Thrush 26-Apr 1-Jun 12-Aug 17-OctHermit Thrush 28-Mar 16-May 14-Sep 12-DecOthers of Interest
  17. 17. Resources BOOKSFIELD GUIDES (SIBLEY, PETERSON, GOLDEN BOOKS) LANDSCAPING FOR WILDLIFE – CARROLL HENDERSON PROJECTS FOR THE BIRDERS GARDEN -FERN MARSHALL BRADLEY INTERNET ALL ABOUT BIRDS (HTTP://WWW.ALLABOUTBIRDS.ORG/) SINGING WINGS (HTTP://SINGINGWINGS.ROHAIR.COM/)
  18. 18.  Attracting Birds tabAll AboutBirds
  19. 19. I Know What I Want HOW DO I GET IT? 3.FOOD 4.WATER 5.SHELTER 6.LIFE
  20. 20. Feed Options
  21. 21. Feed Preferences Chickadee Cardinal Sparrows Wood- Oriole Pigeon - Nuthatch Finch Grosbeaks Blackbirds Jay peckers Tanager Dove BuntingSunflower X X X X X X XSafflower X X XWhole Corn X X XMillet X X X XMilo X XNiger X XSuet X X X XResults based in part on the Cornell Lab of Ornithologys 2005-06 Seed Preference Test, a National Science Experiment sponsored by the National Science Foundation
  22. 22. Woodpeckers Jays Chickadee Nuthatches Cardinals Grosbeaks Finches House SparrowsBlack OilSunflower Seed
  23. 23. Woodpeckers Jays Chickadee Nuthatches Cardinals Grosbeaks Finches House SparrowsStripedSunflower Seed
  24. 24. Woodpeckers Jays Chickadee Nuthatches Cardinals Grosbeaks FinchesSafflower Seed
  25. 25. Chickadee Nuthatches Finches SparrowsNyjer Seed
  26. 26. Game Birds Doves SparrowsProso Millet
  27. 27. Game Birds Woodpeckers Jays Doves Sparrows SQUIRRELS!Corn
  28. 28. Woodpeckers JaysPeanuts
  29. 29. Woodpeckers Jays Cardinal GrosbeakMixes with Fruit
  30. 30. Orioles House FinchGrape Jelly
  31. 31. Game Birds Woodpeckers Jays Doves Chickadee Nuthatches Cardinals Grosbeaks Finches SparrowsMixes
  32. 32. Feeder Options
  33. 33. Bird Feeder Preferences Chickadees Cardinal Sparrows Orioles Pigeon Nuthatches Finches Grosbeak Blackbird Jays Woodpecker Tanager Doves BuntingHanging X X X XPlatform X X X X ?Hopper X X X X ?Ground X X ? XFruit X XSuet X X
  34. 34. Woodpeckers Jays Chickadee Nuthatches Finches SparrowsHanging
  35. 35. Woodpeckers Jays Chickadee Nuthatches Cardinals Grosbeaks FinchesPlatform Feeder
  36. 36. Woodpeckers Chickadee Nuthatches Grosbeaks FinchesHanging Platform
  37. 37. Woodpeckers Jays Chickadee Nuthatches Cardinals Grosbeaks FinchesHopper
  38. 38. Game Birds Doves Cardinals Grosbeaks Finches SparrowsGround
  39. 39. Orioles FinchesFruit
  40. 40. Woodpeckers Chickadee Nuthatches FinchesSuet
  41. 41. Aimed at preventing or limiting specific species such as squirrels or blackbirdsSpecialty Feeders
  42. 42.  Myth: Feeding hummingbirds in late summer can stop their migration. Myth: Birds’ feet can stick to metal perches. Myth: Birds become dependent on bird feeders. Myth: Birds can choke on peanut butter. Myth: If birds eat uncooked rice, it can swell up in their throats or stomachs and kill them.Feeding Myths
  43. 43. Feeding With Native Plants
  44. 44.  Summer-Fall Migration (winter)  Dogwood, plum, viburnums,FRUITING  highbush cranberry, chokecherryPossible to provide  Mountainashfruiting plants fromJune through winterNative plants offer bestsuccessBuy locally grown ifonly hardy to Zone 4Zone 2 and 3 plants arebest purchased fromlocal latitude and north
  45. 45.  Cover – Ground Nesters  Bluestem, Indian GrassGRASSES  Food Source in AutumnNative grass plantingsoffer nesting cover as  Canada Wild Rye, Switchgrasswell as food.Typically need 5 acresto provide safe andsuitable nesting coverOrnamental grasses(non-native) are okay aslong as not invasive.Seed benefit for late fallmigrants provides thebest benefit for birds
  46. 46.  Hummingbirds  and butterflies & pollinatorsNECTAR  often attract insect eating birdsAttracting bugs may be  Virginia Creeper, Honeysuckle,more beneficial thanattracting  Touch-me-nothummingbirds inSouthwest MinnesotaNon-native plants suchas Canna are okay asthey are not invasiveFull sun, and partialshade combinationoffers diversity
  47. 47.  Fruits and SeedsWINTER  Crabapples, bittersweet vine, applesPERSISTENT  Nut-AcornMany crabapplevarieties hold fruit  Hickory, Oakthroughout winter.Several winterpersistent plants havebeneficial springblossoms for attractingbeneficial insects.Nut/Acorn producingshrubs/trees may takedecades to rpoduce
  48. 48. WATERSOUND: DRAW THEM IN DEPTH: ACCESSIBILITY LOCATION: SAFETY
  49. 49. CONIFERSBubbleFlowSplashDrip Make Noise
  50. 50. SHALLOW2-3” is optimal1 foot diameteraccessibleLarge rock or rockcluster at surfaceof deeper ponds(bathing rock)Clear and cleanStable Shallow & Safe
  51. 51. Location examples
  52. 52. SHELTER
  53. 53.  Shelter - Nesting Sites  Spruce, PinesCONIFERS  Food ProducingPrimarily Use –  Juniper, Red Cedar • Nesting • Shelter (esp. winter)Secondary Use – • Food Source
  54. 54.  Shelter – Escape from Predators  Nesting MaterialBRUSH PILE  Twigs, GrassesProtect from weather  Food SourceEscape frompredators  Leaf LitterForaging opportunity
  55. 55. NEST BOXESBluebirdTree SwallowWrenWood DuckChickadeeHOUSE SPARROW! Nest Boxes
  56. 56.  OTHER ATTRACTIONS Roost Boxes  winter Nesting Material Bird Song Recordings Other Attractions
  57. 57. LOCATIONS 1. SAFETY2. OBSERVATION OPPORTUNITY 3. OTHER BENEFITS
  58. 58.  Windows:  Take a Bird’s Eye ViewSAFETY  Look for fly-through opportunitiesBirds need safety frompredators and distancefrom “false” flyways  Solutions:  Silhouettes  Netting  Feeders Closer to Windows  Structures:  Place stations/plantings with 10’ flyway to aid in avoiding collisions
  59. 59.  Predators:  Opportunity Perches near open areasSAFETY  Ambush locations  (cats, etc.)  Traffic  Do not place stations/landscaping that will require birds to cross traffic  Study local current flyways
  60. 60.  Bird WATCHING is half the fun!VANTAGEPOINTSYour enjoyment isprimary and equallybeneficial to the habitatyou provide.
  61. 61. CHALLENGES
  62. 62.  Unwelcome guests Diseased Birds Water Concerns MistakesChallenges
  63. 63. Squirrel!
  64. 64. Guests
  65. 65. Predators
  66. 66. Regularly cleanUse appropriatesolutionsClean all partsfeederUse equipmentThoroughly rinseCompletely Dry Disease
  67. 67. In Ponds orBird BathsAdd fish to pondsUse bleach ratherthan insecticides Insect Larvae
  68. 68. SPECIALCONSIDERATIONS
  69. 69.  Consider long-term implicationsSUNLIGHTThink long-term in tothe future.Landscape may need tochange with the yearsBird species will changewith the years (benefit?)
  70. 70. MARKETINGPLOYSSellers want you topurchase.Know your bird specieshabits beforepurchasing. Marketing
  71. 71. HOUSESPARROWSWrong bird food in theRight FeederEliminate from NestBoxes House Sparrows
  72. 72. Nesting Material
  73. 73. CommunitySpaceGarden for WildlifeCertification (NWF)Community Space forBird Life Other Benefits
  74. 74. Questions

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