Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Screening Process for Hepatitis C

96 views

Published on

Rodney Goodie leverages over two decades of experience in the health care industry to lead the St. Hope Foundation. As CEO of the Texas-based nonprofit, Rodney Goodie oversees teams that treat a broad array of conditions, including hepatitis C virus (HCV), a viral infection that can manifest after direct contact with contaminated blood. Health professionals advise patients at risk of contracting hepatitis C to undergo regular screenings.

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The Screening Process for Hepatitis C

  1. 1. The Screening Process for Hepatitis C Rodney Goodie
  2. 2. Introduction • Rodney Goodie leverages over two decades of experience in the health care industry to lead the St. Hope Foundation. As CEO of the Texas-based nonprofit, Rodney Goodie oversees teams that treat a broad array of conditions, including hepatitis C virus (HCV), a viral infection that can manifest after direct contact with contaminated blood. Health professionals advise patients at risk of contracting hepatitis C to undergo regular screenings. Individuals most at risk of contracting hepatitis C include those with a history of injecting drugs, those who currently inject drugs, and children born to HCV-positive mothers. Adults born between 1945 and 1965 or received a blood transfusion prior to July 1992 also carry a higher risk for the infection, due to the lack of screening procedures for blood used in transfusions. Additionally, professionals who work in an environment where they may come into contact with blood or needles must exert caution to prevent the risk of infecting themselves or others.
  3. 3. Hepatitis C • Early stages of HCV usually produce no symptoms, and the infection can often go undiagnosed until more life-threatening symptoms occur, such as severe liver damage. Regular screening is essential for early detection. Screenings begin with a blood draw, after which physicians test the blood for the presence of specific antibodies. A positive result indicates that the patient came into contact with HCV at some point and must undergo further testing to confirm a diagnosis. Following a positive antibody test, patients take an RNA qualitative test to determine if they are currently infected with HCV. The test screens the patient’s bloodstream for the virus’ genetic RNA material. A negative result means the patient’s body removed the infection naturally, while a positive one confirms a HCV diagnosis. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis will then take an RNA quantitative test to measure the amount of the virus in the bloodstream and assess potential liver damage.

×