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Where do  you  come from? BMDBMD National Burial Index
Burials <ul><li>Of the information sources most frequently used by Family Historians - Census Records, Marriage Registers,...
Burials <ul><li>We all die eventually and - usually - the burial is recorded. A single burial record can, to a varying deg...
Stillbirths <ul><li>Perhaps the most cogent argument for researchers giving more attention to burial records is the way in...
National Burial Index <ul><li>The National Burial Index (NBI) for England and Wales assists family historians find burial ...
Sources <ul><li>Burial records are transcribed mainly by family history societies although helpful individuals contribute ...
Limitations <ul><li>Although coverage in terms of years and locations is now much more extensive, there are still gaps bec...
How many? <ul><li>The First Edition contained 5.4 million </li></ul><ul><li>The Second contained 13.2 million,  </li></ul>...
National Burial index 3 rd  Edition <ul><li>Third Edition entries have increased to more 18.4 million burial records taken...
NBI Coverage 3 rd  Edition
 
 
Access to the NBI <ul><li>I do not have access to the NBI </li></ul><ul><li>The local libraries do not have access to the ...
Where do  you  come from? NBI
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U3a national burial index

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Accessing the National Burial Index

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U3a national burial index

  1. 1. Where do you come from? BMDBMD National Burial Index
  2. 2. Burials <ul><li>Of the information sources most frequently used by Family Historians - Census Records, Marriage Registers, Baptism Registers/Birth Records and Burial Records – the Burial Records (including Monumental Inscriptions) are probably the least regarded and the least frequently accessed </li></ul>
  3. 3. Burials <ul><li>We all die eventually and - usually - the burial is recorded. A single burial record can, to a varying degree, be informative in indicating relationships (son/daughter of, wife of, widow of), address, occupation, religious affiliation; any of these can be useful in indicating follow-up avenues and lead-ins to other records </li></ul>
  4. 4. Stillbirths <ul><li>Perhaps the most cogent argument for researchers giving more attention to burial records is the way in which they record events which never ‘officially’ happened. These are Stillbirths. Officially a stillborn child was never born therefore there is no registration of the birth; because he/she (the gender is rarely given) was not officially born they cannot officially die, hence there is no death certificate, and yet they can be found in the burial records; quite often they have more identifying details than children - and some adults - who survived past their first breath </li></ul>
  5. 5. National Burial Index <ul><li>The National Burial Index (NBI) for England and Wales assists family historians find burial records </li></ul><ul><li>The NBI is now a national archive, giving access to sources held by local repositories, family history societies and groups who are participating in the project </li></ul><ul><li>A cumulative edition is produced at approximately four-yearly intervals </li></ul>
  6. 6. Sources <ul><li>Burial records are transcribed mainly by family history societies although helpful individuals contribute as well. The sources used are: parish registers, bishop's transcripts, earlier transcripts or printed registers, cemetery and crematorium records in all locations (parishes) </li></ul><ul><li>The NBI does not contain monumental inscription records or death registrations </li></ul>
  7. 7. Limitations <ul><li>Although coverage in terms of years and locations is now much more extensive, there are still gaps because not all family history societies are able or willing to join the project due to restrictions to access records, a lack of volunteers, or other commitments </li></ul>
  8. 8. How many? <ul><li>The First Edition contained 5.4 million </li></ul><ul><li>The Second contained 13.2 million, </li></ul><ul><li>The Third Edition contains over 18.4 million </li></ul><ul><li>Burials for the NBI are added cumulatively so that all should appear in later editions </li></ul><ul><li>Not always the case since contributors sometimes change or even delete records during their update work </li></ul>
  9. 9. National Burial index 3 rd Edition <ul><li>Third Edition entries have increased to more 18.4 million burial records taken from Anglican parish; non-conformist; Quaker and Roman Catholic cemetery burial registers throughout England and Wales. </li></ul><ul><li>The NBI is produced by the Federation of Family History Societies with a Full price of £30 if purchased as a completely ‘new’ product i.e. for first time buyers </li></ul>
  10. 10. NBI Coverage 3 rd Edition
  11. 13. Access to the NBI <ul><li>I do not have access to the NBI </li></ul><ul><li>The local libraries do not have access to the NBI </li></ul><ul><li>The Family History Centre (LDS) in Northampton does not have access to the NBI </li></ul>
  12. 14. Where do you come from? NBI

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