THE TRADE‐OFF STRATEGY OF DISRUPTIVE INNOVATORS by Dr. Rod King 

Have you ever wondered how innovators come up with ideas...
Customer Fidelity and Inconvenience are strongly related. Often, by reducing Customer Fidelity 
of a market‐leading produc...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The Trade-off Strategy of Disruptive Innovators

2,305 views

Published on

There's one mantra in business that is always true: "Disrupt or be disrupted." Popularized by Clayton Christensen's seminal book, "The Innovator's Dilemma," the business world is deeply interested in and fascination with the concept as well as strategy of disruptive innovation. This short article introduces a powerful lens - Kevin Maney's Fidelity/Inconvenience model - for understanding the mindset and strategy of disruptive innovators.

Published in: Business, Education
1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Good, clear summary!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,305
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
41
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Trade-off Strategy of Disruptive Innovators

  1. 1. THE TRADE‐OFF STRATEGY OF DISRUPTIVE INNOVATORS by Dr. Rod King  Have you ever wondered how innovators come up with ideas for disruptive products such as  Nintendo’s Wii, YouTube, MP3, and Swatch? I have often wondered too.  Many books have been written about the strategy of disruptive innovation and creative  destruction. The most famous is probably Clayton Christensen’s seminal book, “The Innovator’s  Dilemma.” Although Christensen’s book is comprehensive and insightful, his conceptual  framework appears abstract and not immediately useable in strategic planning. Kevin Maney’s  new book, “Trade‐Off,” also covers disruptive innovation. However, Maney’s book uses a  simpler visual framework and operational language. Subsequent analysis in this article  therefore draws more upon Maney’s Fidelity/Convenience model which puts the trade‐off  concept at the center of disruptive innovation and business success.  ‘Good Enough Fidelity’ and ‘High Convenience’ are the defining characteristics of products that  reflect a Disruptive Innovation strategy. Disruptors try not to initially develop high performance  or ‘perfect’ products or services which are usually expensive, complex to use, and inaccessible  for the mass of the population. Successful disruptors know that high performance products and  services often have a high degree of trade‐off and therefore present opportunities for  disruption. By monitoring inherent trade‐offs in customer experiences, disruptors can virtually  smell where opportunities lie for disruptive innovation.  The degree of trade‐off can be considered as a ratio of Customer Pain to Customer Delight (or  ratio of Customer Inconvenience to Customer Fidelity). By focusing on the degree of trade‐off  as a metric, one can get further insights into the trade‐off strategy of disruptors. The main  strategy of a disruptor is to significantly reduce the degree of trade‐off by reducing Customer  Pain or Inconvenience through a decrease of Customer Fidelity. This disruptive approach goes  against the mindset of market leaders who usually focus on providing greater Customer Delight  or Fidelity at higher cost, that is, at the expense of Customer Convenience. The result is that  market leaders develop products that have high performance but are highly inconvenient for  the masses who hardly buy and use the products. Market‐leading and matured products are  therefore good ‘preys’ for disruptors.  Disruptors mainly reduce Customer Fidelity by laser‐focusing on the fundamental functionality,  character, or meaning of a product; “the 20% feature that is used 80% of the time.” Disruptors  have a ‘no frills’ mindset and this helps in trimming excesses or ‘fat’ off market‐leading  products. Disruptors are often aided by emerging technological innovation. However, higher  performance products can be disrupted with little or no innovation in technology; process and  business model innovation do not necessarily require technological innovation. One advantage  of technological innovation is that it enables disruptors to redefine the meaning and value  proposition of the product and thereby create a Blue Ocean of opportunities which sometimes  fundamentally change their ecosystem as well as rules of the game. 
  2. 2. Customer Fidelity and Inconvenience are strongly related. Often, by reducing Customer Fidelity  of a market‐leading product and especially by lowering performance, Customer Inconvenience  is also reduced. The product becomes more affordable, easier to use, and accessible  (widespread). No wonder that high performance products subsequently lose market share. The  main risks of disruptive products include product imitation, commoditization, and/or price war  from incumbents that eventually lead to bloody Red Oceans. But for many disruptors, the  benefits of disruption outweigh its costs and risks.  In a world sailing towards greater abundance in products and services, ‘good enough’ may just  be the new ‘Gr8.’ But, for how long? History shows that a ‘good enough’ product eventually  evolves towards a higher performance and more complex product that is “inconvenient” and  alienates the mass of population. And the product – a former predator – becomes a ‘prey’ for a  new generation of disruptors. And the evolutionary spiral continues … with the degree of trade‐ off for the species of product getting smaller, smaller, and smaller … The ideal final result is zero  trade‐off. And that’s exactly what the mass of customers want: Free, Perfect, Now! But for now,  most customers are driven by Cheap, Good Enough, and Now. That’s the mantra of the Good  Enough Economy. But, for how much longer?  Best,  Rod.    ‐‐  Dr. Rod King    rodkuhnking@sbcglobal.net  http://tradeoffmap.ning.com  http://twitter.com/RodKuhnKing       

×